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Full text of "The Tiger (student newspaper), Sept. 1929-June 1930"







9bc Colorado College 
OfPicial Students Publication 




VOLUME XXXII 







TVeii^ Alcinorial Building 




Editorial Office— 23 West Colorado Ave. 



September 20, 1929 



THE TIGER 




Howdy Folks! 

Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. We're mighty glad to 
see you. 

With new additions to our already modern equipment w e a r e 
more ready to give you that "Superior Quality" of Workmanship 
than ever. 



CLEANING 
PRESSING 
DYEING 



for Your Convenience 

"Phone us first" 
M. 2958 




TAILORING 
STEAMING 
REPAIRING 



Quality Service 

Suits and Overcoats 
Cleaned and Pressed 

$1.00 



"^^ ^^^ and Ji^ti n 



Jxiundry 

and j)ry Cleaning 



Special Papers for 
Class Note BooI^s 

The special drawing and other papers for use in the 
genuine I-P Note Books form an important place in Out 
West stocks. 

These include papers for Physics, Biology, Geology, 
Themes and Engineering needs. 

And, too, we have all the wanted drawing instruments. 



Every Good 
Thing For 
the Student 



Printing €r 

STVOIONEJOrCO. 

Colorado Springs CMa 



PiGGlYkWiCCLY 



^ 



ALL OVER THE WORLD 

FIVE BUSY STORES IN 
COLORADO SPRINGS 




TIGERS! 

OUR PRODUCTS ARE 
Candied Popcorn 
Roasted Peanuts 
Our own Salted Pea- 
nuts 
Salt Water Taffy 
Buttered Popcorn 



COLORADO SPRINGS 
1 041/2 E. Pikes Peak 



MANITOU, COLORADO 
Soda Springs Pavilion 



COME DOWN 



it 



DINE and DANCE 
AT 

Hbe College Ifnn 

MEET ME AT CULLEY'S 

Students monthly board rates — 3 meals $30 



GIMId TieER 



VOLUME XXXII 



C. C. WEEKLY NEWS MAGAZINE 



Number 1 



COLLEGE EVENTS 



NEW CHAPEL 

Plans for the new Shove memor- 
ial chapel, designed by John Gray, 
Pueblo architect, have been ac- 
cepted, and every day sees the pro- 
ject assuming more tangible pro- 
portions. Bids are to be accepted 
about the first of January, while 
ground will be broken about the 
first of March. 

The chapel is to be of pure Ro- 
manesque architecture tending to- 
wards the severe Norrnan interpre- 
tation of this style. It is to be sim- 
ilar in mass m proportion to Wm- 
chester cathedral in Eingland. The 
keynote of design is an unassum- 
ing simplicity, with an aim toward 
the same enduring quality of the 
old cathedrals. 

In describing it Mr. Gray says: 

"The west front on the main 
axis of the campus is properly ac- 
cented in design and detail, with 
simple octagonal pinnacles, a triple 
light window and large entrance 
rrch with barrel vaulted recessed 
entrance portico and doorway. The 
nave is 30 feet in width and is di- 
vided into five bays with low arch- 
es and cleerestory windows over. 

"The crossing which constitutes 
the tower on the exterior rises well 
above the roof line, with arches on 
four sides into nave transepts and 
chancel. The nave has open wood 
trusses and the chancel is intended 
to have a closed wood ceiling of. 
Romanesque design which may be 
painted in colors after the manner 
of Peterborough cathedral in Eng- 
land. The choice of these ceiling 
types was made so that the chapel 
shall have good acoustics. 

"T h e wood furnishing such as 
^larthex screen choir rail and pan- 
cling in the chancel are designed 
in a free interpretation of the fif- 
teenth century style, such a mix- 
lures of styles being very success- 
ful in many of the old cathedrals 
and churches. 

"The bell chamber of the tower 
i;. reached by the north hall. A 
circular stairway extends to the 
loof of the tov/er from which a 
magnificent view may be obtained. 
The bell chamber is ample enough 
to contain a large bell, or chimes 
or a clock. 

"While an attempt has been 
made to keep the design unassum- 
ing, yet the structure will have 
sufficient height to dominate the 
other buildings on the capmus." 

(Continued on page 6) 



SLOCUM 

It's 11:30 on the morning that 
Colorado College "officially opens". 
A large group of students are col- 
lected outside of Perkins, gossiping 
about the events of the summer, 
looking over the newest Greeks on 
the Crmpus, and congratulating the 
men whom their order failed to 
swing. The faculty approaches in 
full regalia and stops as a gentle 
hint to those who would tarry that 
rssembly has begun. 

The hint is accepted at face val- 
ue and the surging mob crowds into 



til the applause has fianlly died 
down. 

When the preliminaries of the 
services have been finished, the 
president again rises and with a 
beautiful tribute he introduces Dr. 
Slocum, President of Colorado Col- 
lege from 1888 to 1917, builder 
and sponsor of all the college build- 
ings but one, the one who was re- 
sponsible for the large part of our 
endowment funds and who did more 
than any other president to give us 
the reputation and freedom that the 
school enjoys, and President Emeri- 




the building and begins to assume 
some semblance of order as they 
er-ch take seats as near to the back 
as possible. The organ peals a warn- 
ing note, the students stand, and the 
faculty marches soberly down the 
aisle, looking neither to the right 
or left for fear that they might 
smile and betray the fact that they 
are not always digriified. 

At the end of the line walking 
w.th President Mierow is an elderly 
little man, rather pleasant appear- 
ing, but betraying that he posses a 
dominate will and impressing one 
instantly as man who is sincere in 
all that he does. 

After the faculty is seated Pres- 
ident Mierow rises to speak but is 
inslrntly quieted by a storm of ap- 
plause and as a tribute to their 
President, the students, who seem 
really to care for this man rise to 
their feel and remain standing un- 



tus of Colorado College. The sub- 
ject that President Slocum chose 
was one nearest and dearest to his 
heart — simply "Colorado College." 

Because our great President had 
chosen such a subject every word 
hrd a ring of sincerity. It was not 
a great speech because there were 
no flights of inspiring oratory but 
sincerity and charm made it a beau- 
tiful and personal talk to the men 
and women who would one day 
have to do their part in vindicating 
his complete trust in anything that 
had to do with Colorado College. 

In simple forceful English, the 
ideals of the college were set forth 
as they were originally with another 
great founder. General Palmer. 
Freedom from any but intellectual 
domination was the corner stone of 
our first building. Naturalness was 
the characteristic that was to be 
cultivated. And by striving for na- 



turalness, it was believed that a 
man's best self could not help to 
come forward. This is the ideal of 
the college, it has been this for 
pr.st generations and it will be in the 
future. 

A replica of a very famous pic- 
ture of the great pioneer. General 
Palmer, which had been the pos- 
session of President Slocum was 
presented to the college to whom 
he said that it belonged. President 
Mierow in accepting this generous 
gift said, "Everytime I look at this 
picture of this friend I shall re- 
member a friend of mine. Dr. 
Slocum." 



RADIOGRAMS 

A boy on a bicycle pulled up to 
the curb of a Colorado Professor's 
home in Colorado Springs a short 
time ago. He seemed visibly ex- 
cited. Jumping off the wheel he 
let it drop where it had stopped and 
rushed up to the porch, ran t h e 
bell vigorously, and waited cap in 
hand. The bell was answered by 
the professor in question. "Radio- 
gram for Mister Hulbert. Are you 
him?" On receiving an affirmative 
answer, the boy relinquished his un- 
usual message and walking back- 
ward he looked in open eyed admi- 
ration at the man who was promi- 
nent enough to receive radiograms 
from England. 

This message in question was 
from General Charles G. Dawes, 
the United States representative at 
the Court of St. James, and was to 
congratulate Professor Hulbert up- 
on his appointment as a Fellow of 
the Royal Geographic Society of 
Great Britain. The Colorado Col- 
lege professor will now be able to 
place the four letters, F. R. G. S., 
after his name. 

This recognition comes to Hul- 
bert because of the recent book 
which he published — "Frontiers". 
This book deals with the tracing of 
the trails through our continent and 
the colorful history that is to be 
found along tsis trail. 



NEW NURSE 
Mrs Ruth Taylor Montgomery 
takes over duties of school nurse. 
Acts as attendant to hall coeds in 
illness. Mrs. Montgomery is in act- 
ive charge of the new student 
health program to be put in opera- 
tion this year at Colorado College, 
details of which are as yet incom- 
plete. 



^C^bi^ 



THE TIGER 



EVENTS (Continued) 



RETIRING EDITOR 

At the Student Council meeting 
Wednesday, Alvin Foote resigned 
from editorship of the Tiger giving 
as his reason retirement from 
school. Before resigning he rec- 
ommended the following men as 
candidates for editor to succeed 
him: John Hausserman, Jim Key- 
ser, Lloyd Ellis, and Trellyen Now- 
ells. He made further recommen- 
dations to the council as to the 
ability of these men but as yet these 
cannot be made public. 

Then he added to the list of men 
and women whom the previous edi- 
tor had recommended for their 
work on the Tiger the names of 
Clifford Goodson, Betty Fuller, 
Arthur Bayliss, Velma Rose, and 
Elizabeth Kennedy. 

The action to be taken on t h e 
men recommended for editorship 
consists of approval of their eligi- 
bility for this position by the pub- 
lications committee and election of 
one of the candidates by the stu- 
dent council. 

The purpose of the second group 
of recommendations is to deter- 
mine who shall receive Tiger keys. 
According to the ruling students 
who have worked on the Tiger for 
two years are eligible to receive 
keys in their senior year provided 
that they have received the recom- 
mendations of the editors or man- 
agers under whom they have 
worked for faithful help on the 
publication. The only exception is 
that the editor and manager are 
eligible to receive these keys as 
soon as they are elected. 



COUNCIL MEETING 
"What do you think about this," 
thus the newly elected president of 
t h e student body started his ca- 
reer. The particular occasion was 
a special meeting of the student 
council, held to decide concerning 
the All-College Reception and the 
frosh-soph fight. 

At this meeting, there were very 
few present since the faculty mem- 
bers were still busy with the left- 
overs from registration, one of the 
senior women was in Pueblo, and 
two football players were doing 
their duty on the grid. 

This council governs the school 
subject to the constitution and oc- 
casionally to the student body as- 
sembled. It consists of three sen- 
ior men, the one who received the 
highest vote in the election of last 
year being chairman, two senior 
women, two junior men, two junior 
women, and one single sophomore 
man. Its regular meetings are held 
on the first Tuesday of every month 
and special meetings are called fre- 
quently. 



ALL COLLEGE 

Beware of All-College Functions! 
This is the admonition of the Dean 
of Men after his last year's exper- 
ience. For a time it was thought 
that the Reception and Dance 
which is one of the best liked of 
college traditions was not to be held 
at the beginning of this college 
year and that the ruling passed last 
year was to last forever. However 
due to strenuous work on the part 
of one of the faculty members of 
the council and a certain "Doc" 
Vanderhoof this wall be held. 

Of course, it will take place in 
Cossitt. Dr. and Mrs. Mierow, 
Dean and Mrs. Hershey, Dean and 
Mrs. Lovitt, etc. will act as a re- 
ceiving line aided by Stewart Wil- 
son, president of the A. S. C. C. 
The party will begin at eight and 
continue until twelve. Music will 
be furnished by Shonsby and his 
Silver Syncopators, which is a 
newly formed combine of the young 
talent of the town and consists of 
ten ( 1 0) pieces. 

The party will not be boisterous 
since we are entering under condi- 
tions and undue rowdyism will 
cause the withdrawal of favor. The 
only spirits that will be tolerated 
are college spirits and these must 
be used in small quantities. 



BATTLE 

It was decreed in the Council of 
the Associated Students of Colo- 
rado College that the frosh might 
sleep late this year on that fateful 
Friday when the battle between 
them and the sophomores is usual- 
ly staged. This rule was made in 
order to be impartial and allow the 
sophomores to have company in 
their traditional Friday morning 
beauty sleep when the rules of the 
contest usually allowed for the pres- 
ence of those freshmen whom t h e 
sophs did not catch the night be- 
fore and yet did not definitely force 
the sophomores to get up for the 
fray. 



SHORT STORY PRIZE 
Unusually generous is the offer 
of John Hauserman, student at 
Colorado College. Hauserman, a 
recognized poet, writing under a 
pen name, who has offered a prize 
of fifty dollars to the author of the 
best short story submitted to t h e 
Colorado College Tiger this year. 
The prize is to be known as the 
Colorado College Tiger-Hauserman 
short story prize. 

Plan for judging has not yet 
been completed. Mr. A. H. Daeh- 
ler and Miss Amanda Ellis, both of 
the Colorado College English de- 
partment have been selected as 
judges. There will be one other 



judge, yet to be chosen. Manu- 
scripts must be submitted to the 
Tiger before or during the first 
week in April of the present acad- 
emic year. Award will be made 
publicly and the winning story will 
be published in the columns of the 
Tiger. 

Concerning the donor of the 
prize. Hauserman is not only poet 
but organist, pianist and composer 
of no little note. He attended 
Colorado College two years ago and 
has returned this year to continue 
his studies. His poems have been 
published in several eastern maga- 
zines and newspapers. Most im- 
portant of all his honors; he is a 
member of the Brown-Clermont 
County Federation of poets, a fam- 
ous Ohio organization to which be- 
long many world famous poets who 
live thruout the world, most famous 
01 them, George Elliston and B. Y. 
Williams. The Federation is com- 
posed of one hundred twenty mem- 
bers. John Hauserman is the 
youngest person who has ever been 
invited to full membership. 



BOOK FROM AUTHOR 
Dr. Arnold H. Rowbotham, who 
graduated from Colorado College 
in the Class of 1913, has recently 
a copy of his new book on Gob- 
ineau, published by Champion of 
Paris. 



STUDENTS? 

The above question has been 
asked many times. Not only does 
individual scholarship become a 
problem but it is often felt that 
group activity in this sport is de- 
sirable. Three years ago the inter- 
fraternity council offered a cup to 
the fraternity that could make the 
highest average in scholarship for 
any three years. Delta Alpha Phi 
won this cup for three years keep- 
ing the cup each time it won for 
the following year. Now they have 
taken the cup out of circulation. 

Dr. and Mrs. Mierow have offered 
another cup under the same con- 
ditions and the Phi Gams promptly 
won it for the first year by 36 one- 
hundredths of a point over their 
nearest competitors, the scholarly 
Delta Alpha Phis. 

In looking over the averages, it 
is found that in almost every case 
the work for the second semester 
was better than that of the first. 
Look for yourself. 

First Semester 
Phi Gamma Delta - - - 78.65 
Delta Alpha Phi - - - 77.855 
Kappa Sigma - - - - 76.120 

Sigma Chi 72.750 

Beta Theta Pi ... - 73.777 
Pi Kcppa Alpha - - - 67.967 
Phi Delta Theta - - - 72.323 



BIBLE 

"Ye shall know the truth and th« 
truth shall make you free." Thii 
much disregarded motto was fol 
lowed in the new freshman Bible 
which appeared at assembly Wed' 
nesday. Each year a step in ad- 
vance is made concerning the ac- 
curacy of the handbook. 

Last year, with Arlie Beery, Edi- 
tor, marked the beginning of a 
new era in connection with the 
handbook. Franklin Emery has 
made few changes in style but has 
maintained the high standard and 
been a little more careful as to the 
accuracy of this publication. 

TUG-0-WAR 

Injured during a freshman-soph- 
omore tug-of-war at the Colorado 
Agricultural College last Friday, 
Leo J. Green of Gordon, Nebraska, 
died Wednesday following an oper- 
ation performed in a desparate ef- 
fort to save his life. 

The injury occurred when Green, 
who was a member of the Fresh- 
man class at the school, had tied 
the end of the rope about his bodj 
to act as anchor man for the frosh 
in the tug. The knot slipped undei 
the tremendous pressure and the 
noose tightened about h i m while 
he was being dragged through a 
mud-hole by his classmates. Among 
other serious internal injuries, two 
ribs were torn loose by the pressure. 

Later complications developing 
made an emergency operation nec- 
essary in an effort to save his life. 

President Charles A. Lory, of the 
Colorado Agricultural College said 
later that he would issue a formal 
statement after an investigation 
which he personally conducted. 

The coroner announced the 
death was purely an accident and 
no inquest would be held. 



NEW DIETICIAN 
Succeeding Miss Hazel Earle as 
dietician of Bemis and Cossitt din- 
ing rooms, is Miss Dorothy Roberts, 
graduate of Iowa State College al 
Ames Iowa. Received her training 
and experience there. Immediate 
favorable impression was created 
by her meals. 





Second Semestei 


For the year 


(1) 


80.146 (2) 


79.398 (1) 


(2) 


80.185 (1) 


79.020 (2) 


(3) 


77.690 (3) 


76.905 (3) 


(5) 


74.298 (4) 


73.524 (4) 


(4) 


73.057 (6) 


73.147 (5) 


(7) 


74.285 (5) 


71.126 (6) 


(6) 


70.406 (7) 


70.865 (7) 



• - ■' r 



THE TIGER 



BUICK MOTOR CARS 



Strang's 



Harry D. MacDonald 
President 



T. J. Collier T. M. Collier 

V. L. Collier 

TheCOLLIER 

LUMBER CO. 

Phone Main 386 

543 W. Colorado Ave. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 



RIALTO 

Starts Saturday 

CHAS. (Buddy) 
ROGERS 

and 

NANCY 
CARROLL 

in 

"ILLUSION" 



All Talking, Singing and 

Dancing Jazz Revue and 

Love Story. 



NEW CHAPEL 

(Continued from pagre 3) 

When completed the chapel will 
seat a thousand and will then be 
amply large to seat audiences for 
commencements, vesper services, 
and extra fine musical programs. 
It will not be used for student 
meetings or anything of that type. 

After the groi.nd is broken, i t 
will take about a year to complete 
the construction of this new build- 
ing. The location of this chapel 
will be on the east side of the cam- 
pus facing Pikes Peak. 



NOTICE 

Due to a popular request, a 
speech class is to be opened for 
men, by Mrs. Barnes. All interest- 
ed should call Mrs. Barnes at Main 
2862-J. Class hours will be ar- 
ranged. 



NOTICE 

A meeting of the Intersociety 
Council will be held Friday, Sep- 
tember 20 in the Student Govern- 
ment room in Bemis Hall at 2:45 
o'clock. All societies are requested 
to have their representatives pres- 
ent to discuss pledging date. 

Representatives from the societies 
are as follows: 
Minerva — 

Senior, Grace Perkins 

Junior, Geneviev Engel 
Contemporary — 

Senior, Helen Hageman 

Junior, Eleanor Barnhart 
Hypatia — 

Senior, Elizabeth Meston 

Junior, Lois Seebach 
Zetalethian — 

Senior, Frances Glau 

Junior, Mary Sevier 

Chairman of the Intersociety 
Council, Randalin Trippel. 



FRESHMEN, TAKE NOTICE 

The poor unsophisticated youngsters just get out of one ordeal and 
fall into another. The following will illustrate our point . The battle 
has been done away with but the good old belt, razor strap, and wooden 
paddles are still guaranteed to give a tingling sensation without harm- 
ing (too much) the culprit. 

Take notice! After a few weeks yellow caps for these children 
will be in order. Those who are either too old or think themselves too 
good to wear these bonnets will be subjected to several varieties of pun- 
ishments. Certain paid informers will be stationed here and there on the 
campus. These men will turn in the names of those who do not wear 
the caps. THEN some day when you are sitting trembling in your seats 
at assembly your naihe will be called. You will jump from your seat 
and unhappily file out of the door. There you will be met by an ener- 
getic bunch of older men who will start you on the road to fame. (We 
have always heard that it was bumpy). By the time that you reach the 
end of that long road your facial expression will be something like that 
of this poor victim while your tormentors will wear an expression quite 
similar to that of the man on the left. So do remember that the edicts 
of the school are to be obeyed. 

Do not try to cut chapel. It can not be done. You are only al- 
lowed two cuts c.nd then the heavy hand of the administration will de- 
scend upon you. Then too the brothers in the fraternity will be es- 
pecially watchful to see that there are no laggers and heaven pity you 
at their tender hands. As a hint, you may begin being fearful when 
the enthusiasm chairman says, "I guess that will be all — but — will the 
Freshman men remain in their seats after chapel." 



Frank Geddy Says— 

Drop in an chat with me 
Tigers Always Welcome. I 

specialize in sole repairing 
and fine leather work. 

The Shoe Shop 

Across from the High School 



Phone M. 1710 5 W. Colo. Ave. 

IDEAL CLEANERS 

VALETOR PRESSING 
SERVICE 



WHY NOT 

Learn Typewriting 
while attending Col- 
lege? Your teachers 
will appreciate type- 
written work to be 
checked. We can ar- 
range hours to suit 
your convenience. 



<^p 






cMPP? 



(^Iot3t>o c>pirnas,(gi(c>i3\> 




Let this be a warning. It has happened before and can happen again. 



THE TIGER 



EDITORIAL 




Member of Rocky Mountain Inter-Collegiate Press Association 

The Colorado College Newspaper, Published Weekly by the Students. 



JAMES PATTERSON Manas 

Main 2575 



THIS ISSUE EDITED BY 
Jim Keyser 



PRESIDENT SLOCUM. 

With the gala opening of another Colorado College year and the 
return of familiar campus scenes and activities, our thoughts naturally 
turn to Tiger years of the past and the future. With due concentration 
on the present, we pass from year to year and then out into the world, 
joining the busy ranks of those who retrospect hastily and then file 
into oblivion. 

A few have hesitated and given their valuable passing years to 
causes that others might prosper. It is in this class that we should re- 
call the work of Dr. William F. Slocum. Throughout the past two score 
years, he has been a faithful guardian to our school; building, guid- 
ing, and now watching. 

His presence here at this time brings us to a greater realization of 
the masterly care which he gave this institution in its infancy and of 
the undying Tiger loyalty which he holds in his heart. 

Few are the old grads who do not remember "Prexy" and their 
intimate acquaintances with him. On the campus, in the office, or in 
the stands, he was always an enthusiast for the thing for which he has 
given so much of his life. 

It is with deserving pride that Dr. Slocum recalls the campaign 
for the C. C. endowment, the construction of all the buildings with the 
exception of Cutler, the establishment of the Harvard Exchange Pro- 
fessorship, and countless other improvements in our college. His work 
in securing prominent and progressive professors played a large part in 
the growth of our school. 

A mere expression of gratitude would be too humble for the co- 
lossal accomplishments of this second founder of Colorado College. But 
although students pass hastily on and new ones replace them, the school 
still stands as a silent tribute in honor of this man. 

Contributed — A. B. 



MAGAZINE OR PAPER? 

With this issue come two important changes. As is probably al- 
ready known the editor who was elected last Spring has resigned from 
the Tiger for the time being after suggesting and starting this new form 
for our paper. The other important announcement is, of course, as to 
our policy for the year. This issue in this form was already well started 
so the present temporary editor felt that it would be best to give this 
new plan a trial. 

Consequently at the present everything is up in the air but before 
another Tiger goes to press a permanent editor will be selected and will 
undoubtedly state his own policy, we can only give our own reasons 
for wishing to give this a trial and hoping that it will prove satisfactory. 

Too long has a paper been couched in stilted terms, the writers 
own personality has been subjugated to the actual value of the news 
story. This is satisfactory for a daily paper but we believe that college 
publications should be different. In the first place, in a school such as 
ours where everything even most of our dances are informal; why 
must our publications be stiff formal expressions of matter-of-fact in- 
cidents? Then our paper observes the dates of a news magazine and 
yet hopes to be called a paper because of its form. It is the era of new 
departure in everything, why not give our publications a chance to 
blossom out in all their glory? 



Last year it was proved definitely that 'a literary magazine could 
not be over successful on our campus, partly because the business men 
of the town have been advertised to death, and partly because actual 
literary achievement was not over abundant in this college. A news- 
paper is certainly not the place for literary work unless one choses to 
call serial stories such. However in this magazine, it would certainly be 
in place to have a section reserved for such work. 

We ask your cooperation and your support for this new attempt, 
During the time that we have been on the campus we have heard noth- 
ing but continual criticism of the Tiger and its attempts to become 
worthwhile. Decide one way or the other and actively support youi 
choice instead of hoping to improve things by knocking in the good 
old bull sessions. 



APOLOGY. 

Under the above glowing description of what we hope will be done 
with the new magazine, we wish to print an apology and an explanation 
so that too much will not be expected of this infant which will perhaps 
grow to manhood or may be stifled in its mere childhood. 

Conditions have not been such that a complete and perfected edi- 
torial policy could be planned. Word was received of the resignation 
of the previous editor two days before this was due to appear. The 
plan was already made to publish the Tiger in this form and if this is 
a pretty sorry affair, do give it a little longer trial under a regularly 
elected editor. Then if you are convinced that the thing is impossible 
you will in all likelihood be given an open meeting in assembly to dis- 
cuss it and approve or reject our new plan. 



THE GLAD HAND. 

Freshmen, we are glad to see you here. You have one of the 
largest classes in history and from all appearances one of the best. 
Make an extra effort to keep it so. You are now entering a college 
that has a proud history and, if you remain in school with us, we ex- 
pect you to do your level best to advance our standards and to try to 
gain the spirit and fight in every line for which Colorado College is 
noted. We want above all each man to become a working part of our 
organization. 

Find some activity that suits you, either one in wihch you have 
specialized at High School or one that you believe you have ability to 
follow; go out for this extra-curricular activity now, follow it up per- 
sistantly; and we can promise you success sometime before you have 
finished your college course. 

What we are going to tell you now is important. You will prob- 
ably hear it in class several times but repetition will not hurt at this 
time. Do not neglect your studies. No matter how good you may be 
in other things they will not keep you in school and we presume that 
you came to college to make something worth while of yourself. Go tc 
class every day, do not cut because you are given unusual freedom, 
keep up on your work, and then when exams come around you can go 
to a picture show and laugh at the worried boys who are cramming a 
year's work into a few hours. It can be done and if you will do these 
things nothing can keep that much revered sheepskin out of your hands 

All this may sound pedantic and stupid but when you see the boy; 
who every year flunk out and ruin the best chance of their lives yot 
will understand what we mean. 

Lots of luck to you, men. (You need it). 



COMMENT. 

Certain of the older men of the campus will probably wonder wha 
we are coming to when they realize that the first Friday in the schoo 
year has gone by and yet no classic struggle has been held between th< 
frosh and the aged sophomores. To them we would say that this tra 
dition died a natural death last year when the sophomores overslept anc 
better than have a repetition of that affair it was hoped that some othe 
thrilling event could be staged later for the benefit of the few womer 
and upperclassmen who wish to see it. It is certainly much better t( 
have some energetic tradition than one which if left for another tw( 
years would die a natural death. 



THE TIGER 



HOLLY SUGAR 

is 
the Best 

Sugar the essential food. 

HOLLY SUGAR 
CORPORATION 



Get your hair cut 
at the 

College 
Barber Shop 

Your patronage will be 
appreciated. 



PAUDRE-PAUFFE 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Permanent Finger and Watei 

Waving 

iVh nicure and Scalp Treatments 

Marcels 50c. 



i CITYCOAL 

I 15 East Pikes Peak Avenue 

1 Phone 

I Main 67 or 120 



Photographs of our Colorado 
♦ mountains. Nicely made — 
j attractively colored by hand. 
I Moderate in price — framed 
I or unframed. 

H. L. STANDLEY 
PHOTOGRAPHER 



Colorado Springs 



SOCIETY 



W. I. Lucas 

HAS 

EVERYTHING IN 

SPORTING GOODS 

"Tigers always welcome" 

119N. TejonSt. 
Main 900 



PLEDGES 

Someone should have blown the 
whistles Tuesday night at twelve. 
There were only two groups that 
were glad that rushing was over — 
the ru&hees and the actives. If it 
were not so against tradition, Cut- 
ler bell could well have rung. We 
must have a wonderful Freshman 
class. Each fraternity claims that 
it has the best class on the campus 
and each has gotten its share to 
help pay for the old chapter house. 
Kappa Sigs caught 19, Phi Gams 
.hooked 16, Pi Kaps roped 15, and 
the other claimed their share of the 
poor boys with a score of 12 for 
the Sigs and the Betas and one of 
I I for the Phi Delts. 
The neophytes are as follows: 

Beta Theta Pi 
Hulbert Cruzan, Los Angeles; 
Tom Pulliam, Dave Moffat, J i m 
McCluskey, Trinidad; Bill Beatty, 
Glendale, California; Rudolph An- 
derson, Leadville; Ralph Smith, 
Sam Larson, Colorado Springs; Bill 
Walters, Long Beach, California; 
John Hall, Everett Stapleton, Grand 
Junction. 

Kappa Sigma 
Clayton Cheek , Manzanola, 
Colo.; Ralph Dral, Marvin Enge- 
bretson, Baden Hunt, Clay Pome- 
roy, Byron Whalley, Jack Curry, 
Joe Brady, Jack Fisher, Lewis Yard, 
Colorado Springs; Edwin Engstrom, 
Little Rock, Ark.; Morris Griffith, 
Palisade, Colo.; Richard Hale, Lit- 
tleton; Fred Schmidt, Denver; 
James Waddell, Loveland; Ralph 
Jones, Grand Junction; Morley 
Brandborg, Grand Junction. 
Phi Delta Theta 
Ed Johnson, Glenwood Springs; 
Richard Grant, Golden; Swede 
Roark, Lotz Deholtzer, Stanley Ry- 
erson, Denver; Bill Bradshaw, 
Marion Deutsch, Monte Vista; Don- 
ald Haney, Ed Sass, Colorado 
Springs; Jim McElvain, Denver; 
Bob Mercer, Ashland, Ore. 
Phi Gamma Delta 
John Metzler, Harold Britten, 
Duane Osborn, Hartley Murray, 
John Bennett, Ray Ryan, Colorado 
Springs; Bob Stillman, Bill Baker, 
Harold Wellman, Pueblo; Arthur 
Bishop, Denver; Gale Middlestetter, 
Ivan Schweninger, La Junta; Fred 
Nichols, Trinidad; Gene Lague, 
Monte Vista; Barret O'Hara, Chi- 
cago, 111.; Jack Rorer, Salida. 
Pi Kappa Alpha 
Kenneth Alderson, Ordway, 
Colo.; Owen Owens, Price, Utah; 
La Mar Hill and Duane Brough, 
Thistle, Utah; Bert Vandervleet, 
Chicago, II!.; Lloyd Roberts, Lester 
Butler and Clarence Boese, Vona, 
Colo.; Sidney Harding, Pueblo, 
Colo.; David McArlhur, Denver, 



Colo.; James Thompson, Littleton, 
Colo.; Fred Jones, Peyton, Colo.; 
Robert White, Edward Fitzgerald, 
and Darcy Shock, all of Colorado 
Springs; Fred Price, Manitou. 
Sigma Chi 
Harry Burton, Colorado Springs; 
Amra Butler, Raymond Fries and 
Emanuel Martin, Brush, Colo.; Ed- 
ward Blaine, Colorado Springs; 
Clark Schnurr, Henry Willy, Man- 
itou, Colo.; William Thomas, Long 
Beach, Calif.; Theo. Thulemeyer, 
La Junta, Colo.; Harry Onufrock, 
Colorado Springs; Marvin Russell, 
Denver, Colo.; Merritt Ritter, New 
Castle Colo.; John Erickson, Colo- 
rado Springs. 



ENROLLMENT 
Each year things get better at 
Colorado College we are frank to 
admit. Our requirements get stiff- 
er, our tuition is not the lowest, and 
excra fees are added; yet our en- 
rollment increases. Our present 
freshman class is the second largest 
in history two hundred thirty-two 
young eager students ready to em- 
bark upon their college career. This 
is to be compared with 260 of 1924 
and 186 last year. The sophomores 
are back 145 strong, the juniors 
97, and the seniors 64, while there 
are twenty people taking special 
work with the college. This makes 
358 as compared with 536 of last 
year. 



CHOCOLATES 
Good as Made 

Box Goods a Specialty 
WALLACE CANDY COMPANY 



^ii«, .»..».,»..». .«■.»..»..»■■ 



J. C. PENNY CO. 

Inc. 



"A suit, new shoes and 
a cap — all for what we ex- 
pected to pay for the suit 
alone! 

Remarks such as this are 
not uncommon in a J. C. 
Penney Co. Store. Years 
ago Mr. Penney resolved to 
keep our prices low, cut every 
unnecessary expense, and 
take the smallest possible 
profit. 

Has it paid? Well lest year 
customers brought us over 
$175,000,000 of their bus- 
iness. Passing the savings on 
to the customer, certainly 
does pay. 



Awnings and Camp Supplies 



"Better Equipped Than Eve 
To Handle College Trade." 



CAMPBELL'S 

BARBER SHOP 



109 East Pikes Peak Avenue 



The Trip that Bankrupts the 
English Language 

CORLEY 

Mt. Highway 

Cripple Creek in high gear 



AMERICA 

Coming Sunday for 1 Week 

"THE COCK EYED 
WORLD" 

Comedy Drama of hot 
Mammas and Marines 

with 
VICTOR McLAGLEN 



Coming Sunday, Sept. 29 
WILL ROGERS 

in his new all talkie 

"THEY HAD TO 
SEE PARIS" 



Coming Thursday, Oct. 3 

WALTER CATLETT and 
SUE CAROL in 

"WHY LEAVE 
HOME" 

Musical Comedy Version of 
"Cradle Snatchers" 



Sunday, Oct. 6th 

GEORGE O'BRIEN and 
HELEN CHANDLER in 

"SALUTE" 

See and hear the 
ARMY-NAVY GAME 



THE TIGER 



Three Famous Groups 
of Fine Fountain 
Pens and Pencils 

— Sheaf fer, Wahl, Parker 

In these famous makes — Pens and Pencils separately 
or in sets — the student can select from a wide variety of 
styles. 

Among the new designs are many beautiful as well as 
dependably useful models, all displayed for each choosing. 



Kodaks, Cine-^Kodaks 

Good Developing 

and Printing 



1 7 N. Tejon 



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& Knight 



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Custer 



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Plumbing Heating 



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PLAZA 

DINING 
ROOM 

"The Place to Eat" 

Breakfast Luncheon I 

Dinner | 

1 .».>.».,..». „ ■...,.,.,. „ . ,.» . ■ ■ I » ■ . ■ »4i 



SPORTS 



Quality 

Cleaners and Dyers 

SUITS, O'COATS 

HATS $1.25 

U-Fone 1-8-1-1 We'll Call 

H. A. Thompson 
10 E. Kiowa 



4, 



WHAT CHANCE FOOTBALL? 

In view of the fact that Novem- 
ber 16 was open date on the sched- 
ules of both the Colorado College 
Tigers and Western State Mountain- 
eers' football schedules, that date 
has been set aside for a game be- 
tweent two teams. It was at 
first thought that the game might 
be played on Washburn field on 
Saturday, October 5, but conditions 
arose which made this date out of 
the question. 

Coach W. T. "Bully" Van de 
Graaff, Colorado College mentor is 
now putting his charges through 
stiff grinds behind closed gates in 
order that nobody can get a line 
on what the tricky football coach 
is going to spring on the Colorado 
Aggies when they, journey to Colo- 
rado Springs for the Tigers' first 
game of t h e season October 1 2. 
Aided by h i s two assistants, Ole 
Herigstad, former Pueblo Central 
high school coach, and Freddie 
Pickhard, former Alabama star and 
all-american tackle for two years, 
Van de Graaff promises something 
that bids fair to startle both fans 
and foe when the results are 
brought to light on that date against 
the Farmer school. 

The first scrimmage of the season 
was held Wednesday night and the 
coach put his men through the 
fundamentals an d technicalities 
now simple, but due to grow more 
complex as time advances. Every 
man has his part to play in every 
play and every signal, and this is 
Bully is trying to teach his charges 
now. 

Only two casualities, and neither 
of them serious, have resulted thus 
far in practice. Guy Martin received 
a cleat in the eye in the first scrim- 
mage, and although it cut a nasty 
gash, ought not to hinder the Den- 
ver lad within a day or two. Ed- 
die Hartman, freshman star of 
several years ago is on the sidelines 
with doctor's orders to keep off of 
an infected toe, resulting from an 
ingrown nail. It is not believed that 
this injury will keep him out more 
than a day or two longer. "Inky" 
INgraham with his "glass" knee has 
surprised spectators and fans by the 
ability he has to keep it out of the 
way. So far "Inky's" knee has both- 
ered him very little, but only time 
will tell whether or not he will be 
able to last out the season. 

The inimitable "Dutch" Clark 
All,American quarterback of 1928 
and this year's Bengal captain, has 
been carrying on the brunt of t h e 
ball-toting and from all indications 
should have even a better year than 
last. His manner of skirting the 
ends, bucking the line, punting. 



passing, hurdling, and changing his 
pace are almost unfathomable to 
the majority of spectators whc 
don't know football at its mosi 
technical points. The Flying Dutch- 
man will have his hands full this 
year in view of the absence of Roj 
Vandenburg, but rail birds are 
counting on him to have the besi 
year of his four. 

Coach Van de Graaff lined up 
his two teams yesterday in scrim- 
mage as follows: 

Team No. T Team No. 2 

Weaver, c c, Rea 

Hayden, g g, Southarc 

Cogan, g g, L. Starbucl 

McGory, t t, Campbel 

E. Starbuck, t t, Hetei 

Reid, e e, Warning 

Hinkley, e , e, Trigg; 

Clark, qb qb, Hamptor 

Ingraham, hb hb, Akir 

Pomeroy, hb hb, Kell} 

Irwin, fb fb, Jonej 

Substitutes — Hill, Yard, Parker 
Mathieson and Martin. 

A hard schedule is ahead of the 
Colorado College Tiger footbaf 
eleven this year. Beginning Octo- 
ber 12, the Tigers meet the Aggie; 
from the Colorado Agricultura 
school on Washburn field at Colo- 
rado Springs. 

The following week the Bengal; 
journey to Denver to meet one ol 
the strongest teams in the confer 
ence, Denver University, on thei: 
home field. Following this the tean 
will get a week's layoff before 
journeying to Logan, Utah for '< 
tussle with the Utah Agricultura 
College on November 2. 

The Saturday following this, No 
vember 9, will see the Utah Uni 
versity Red Devils in Colorad( 
Springs playing the Tigers at thei 
annual Homecoming of old gradu 
ates and students. The game re 
centy arranged follows on Novem 
ber 16 here with the Mountaineer 
from Western State College. 

Probably the hardest game of thi 
year will be the one between t h < 
Tigers and the:r ancient foe, Cole 
rado University, at Boulder. I 
will be Bculder's homecominj 
which will make it all the tougher 
This game will be played on No 
vember 23 at the State stadium. 

The ser son ends on Thanksgiv 
ing dry with a game against thi 
Colorado School of Mines at Pu 
eblo. It v>':ll be the last rppearanc 
of Dutch Clark, Pueblo idol, in i 
Bengal uniform and Pueblo bus 
ness men have asked that thi 
game be played in Pueblo. 

The entire Rocky Mountain ccn 
ference football schedule for 192' 
will be as follows: 



THE TIGER 



SPORTS 



September 28: Colorado Aggies- 
Regis at Denver, Black Hills Nor- 
mad vs. Wyoming at Laramie, Wes- 
tern State vs. Utah university at 
Salt Lake, Brigham Young vs. Ne- 
vada at Reno, Montana State vs. 
Idaho at Moscow. 

October 5: Wyoming vs. Colo- 
rado Aggies at Port Collins, Mines 
vs. Denver at Denver, Regis vs. 
Colorado university at Boulder, 
Kearney Normal vs. Colorado 
Teachers a t Greeley, Brigham 
Young vs. California Aggies at 
Sacramento, Montana State vs. 
Utah Aggies at Bozeman, Nevada 
vs. Utah university at Salt Lake. 

October 12: Colorado Aggies vs. 
Colorado college a t Colorado 
Springs, Wyoming vs. Denver at 
Denver, Teachers vs. Colorado uni- 
versity at Boulder; Mines vs. Wes- 
tern State at Salida, Brigham 
Voung vs. Montana State at Provo. 

October 19: Colorado Aggies vs. 
Mines at Golden; Colorado college 
vs. Denver at Denver, Colorado uni- 
versity vs. Utah university at Salt 
Lake, Teachers vs. Western State 
at Gunnison, Brigham Young uni- 
versity vs. Utah Aggies at Logan. 

October 26: Colorado Aggies vs. 
Utah university at Fort Collins, 
Mines vs. Teachers at Greeley, 
Wyoming vs. Utah Aggies at Lar- 
amie, Western State vs. Brigham 
Young university at Provo, Mon- 
tana State vs. Montana university 
at Butte. 

November 2: Colorado Aggier- 
vs. Western State at Fort Collins, 
Denver university vs. Colorado uni- 
versity at Boulder, Wyoming vs. 
Teachers at Greeley, Colorado col- 
lege vs. Utah Aggies at Logan, 
Brigham Young university vs. Utah 
university at Salt Lake. 

November 9: Colorado Aggies 
vs. Utah Aggies at Logan, Colorado 
university vs. Mines at Golden, 
Colorado college vs. Utah univer- 
sity at Colorado Springs. 

November 1 I : Teachers v s. 
Brigham Young university at Provo, 
Wyoming vs. Montana State at 
Sheridan. 

November 16: Colorado Aggies 
vs. Colorado University at Fort 
Collins, Utah Aggies vs. Denver at 
Denver, Wyoming vs. Utah univer- 
sity at Laramie, Western State vs. 
Montana State at Bozeman. 

November 23: Colorado univer- 
sity vs. Colorado college at Boul- 
der, Wyoming vs. Brigham Young 
university at Provo. 

November 28: Colorado Aggies 
vs. Denver at Denver, Utah Aggies 
vs. Utah university at Salt Lake. 



FROSH GRID MEN 
Beef — there is more of this in 
this year's freshmen squad than 
ever before. Reporting to Fresh- 
man Coaches Leo Roessner and 
Roy Vandenburg at their initial 
practice Wednesday afternoon 4 6 
men showed more displacement per 
man than any squad that has ever 
appeared behind the Washburn 
field grandstands. 

Freshmen will have plenty on 
their hands to do this year, too, 
when they meet the second year 
men in practice scrimmage and will 
need all of the beef they can mus- 
ter. It is the aim of Coach Bully 
Van de Graaff to start these men 
out right now in his way of football 
in order that they will have some 
idea what it is all about when they 
report for varsity practice next 
September. 

Drill in fundamentals and con- 
ditioning forbade much singling out 
of individual performers at practice 
last night. Things are getting un- 
der way in a hurry and in fine 
shape because freshmen coaches 
will have to build and build fast to 
develop a team which will come 
anywhere near being able to com- 
pete against the varsity and give 
them the kind of scrimmage they 
I need. 

j But under the watchful eyes of 
I Roessner and Vandenburg, both 
I former Tiger stars, the frosh ma- 
I terial should come around in great 
; shape and give the varsity men a 
tough job of it. 

After the Colorado Aggies-Regis 
game at Denver a week from Satur- 
day and the Aggie-Wyoming game 
the following Saturday, the Bengal 
frosh will be given the Aggie plays 
for the varsity to work against and 
try to shatter. 

The mountanious figure of Dave 
Moffat, former Trinidad high school 
star linesman looms out among the 
rest of the frosh squad. Moffat, 
who weighs 246 pounds, played his 
last three years on the Trinidad 
eleven and will bid fair to make a 
regular berth on both the Frosh 
team this year and the varsity next 
year. 

Deutsch, Monte Vista, Allison, 
West Denver, and Butterfield, Ore- 
gon were all stars in their high 
school days and ought to show up 
well in college against other con- 



ference material. 

The following men reported for 
practice Wednesday night in t h e 
Baby Bengal uniforms: 

Ralph Jones, Vandemoer, John 
Hall and J. E. Stapleton, Grand 
Junction, Colo.; Mercer, Harris- 
burg, Ore.; Butterfield, Chico, 
(Continued on page 10) 



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make an ideal gift to send home or to 
friends. 

The subschiption price is $2.00 per 
year anywhere in the United States or 
Canada. 




James Patterson, 

Business Manager 

1117 N. Nevada 



r^ 



^ 



COSSITT 
DINING HALL 

Back your College 

in every good thing 

— even in eating 



THE COST IS MODERATE 
FOR THE BEST OF MEALS 

WEEKLY RATE $7.25 
Credit for Single Meals 



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10 



THE TIGER 



BE 
POPULAI 




You're welcome anywhere in a 
Saunders System car. Drive one 
of our brand new Chryslers or 
Model A Fords on your next party 
or date. By sharing expenses two 
or more may have a fine large 
evening at small cost' Special low 
rates on long trips. 



MUNDERS 



It Yourself] 



SYSTEM 



\mmm'm^ 



SPARE TIME WORK 

After regular Classes as our Bonded Rep- 
resentatives on "Varsity Felt Goods" net- 
ted a Notre Dame Student over $1200 in 
six montiis. Big earnings, dignified, con- 
genial work, valuable experience and no 
investment required. Your agency vron't 
be open very long. Write for free parti", 
ulars today. Bradford & Co., Inc., Si. 
Joseph, Michigan. 



DUTCH 

for touchdowns and DUTCH 
(Hammond) for new driver- 
less cars. 



New Fords 7c per mile; 
30c per hour. 

New Cheve 6 to 8c per mile; 
35c per hour. 



Office 

ELK HOTEL 

Phones M. 346 and 2065 
Free Delivery 



PERSONALS 



KEYTE WRITES 
Mr. I. Allen Keyte, Professor 
of Geology at Colorado College, is 
the c.uthor of an article entitled 
"Correlation o f Pennsylvanian- 
Permian of Glass Mountains and 
Delaware Mountains" published in 
the August, 1 929 issue of The Bul- 
letm of the American Association 
of Petroleum Geologists. 

CLASS TO TOIL 
Professor Hulbert has been ap- 
pointed a National Committeeman 
for the Oregon Trail Association. 
At first glance this does not seem 
to have much bearing upon Colo- 
rado College. However the asso- 
ciation will hold its Centennial next 
year and this means a considerable 
amount of research since each town 
along that famous trail will con- 
duct an appropriate celebration. 
The students in History 48 are go- 
ing to do this research and make 
a strenous attempt to determine 
what celecbration would be in place 
at such town. 

VISITOR 

Dr. Edwin Kirk, of the United 
States Geological Survey of Wash- 
ington, hc.s ]ust returned home 
r.fter a. four day's visit as the guest 
of Professor and Mrs. I. Allen 
Keyte. While here. Dr. Kirk inspect- 
ed the fossil collection of Colorado 
College from the lower Paleozoics. 



PROF AND SON TRAVEL 
Professor I. Allen Keyte and his 
son, Mr. Max Keyte, are driving 
to Laramie, Wyoming, to meet a 
party of two hundred geologists 
This is the third annual geology 
trip of the Kansas State Geolog- 
ical Society which started in the 
Black Hills the first of September 
and which will reach Denver on the 
15th. Included in the group are 
eight State Geologists, twenty-five 
Professors of Geology of various 
universities and a number of petrol- 
eum geologists. 

Mr. Claire Coffin, Chief Geolog- 
ist for the Midwest Oil Company 
and Professor Keyte will have 
charge of the party in Colorado. 
Professor Keyte will deliver an ad- 
dress before the society at Fort 
Collins on the night of September 
12 on "The Stratigraphy of the 
Front Range". 



NEW DEAN 
Born and raised in Denver, Colo- 
rrdo. Graduated from Colorado 
College, class of 1904. Teacher in 
various public schools. Recently in- 
structor in Englisli at Boston Uni- 
versity and head of dormitory there. 



That is the personal career of Mrs. 
Louise Warner Fauteaux, new dean 
of women at Colorado College, who 
succeeds Mrs. Lee, dean here for 
several years. 

Concerning her policy as the new 
dean. Unwilling to instigate sweep- 
ing reforms at her entrance in the 
belief that as a new member of an 
excellently moving cooperative in- 
stitution she should adapt hereself 
them and reform later if necessary. 

Mrs. Fauteaux ,h a s already im- 
pressed students, men and women. 

DIRECTOR OF HALLS 
New Director of Halls, succeeding 
Mrs. George Walenta, is Miss Lou^ 
ise Purves, graduate of Rcidcliffe 
and head of Briggs Hall at that 
eminent coed university for the past 
few years. 

— — ••• 

HULBERT TO STAY 
Instead of spending the second 
semester in work for the Stewart 
Commission of Western History, 
Professor Hulbert will in all prob- 
ability continue teaching classes in 
American History at Colorado Col- 
lege throughout the year. This of 
course depends upon certain con- 
ditions. Of course, if a telegram 
came saying that his theory as to 
certain parts of the Santa Fe trail 
was being refuted, then we might 
have to look for another American 
History teacher while Professor 
Hulbert went on a trip to prove 
(hat he was right. 

FROSH GRID MEN 

(Continued from page 9) 

Calif.; Raymond Fries, Emra Bit- 
ter, and Emanuel Martin, Brush, 
Colo.; Bill Bradshaw and Deutch, 
Monte Vista, Colo.; Henry Willie, 
Clark Schnurr and Raymond Hill- 
igoss, Manitou, Colo. ; Hancock and 
Marckly of Jasper, Tex.; Weidman 
and Bob Stillman of Pueblo, Colo.; 
Barrate O'Hara, Chicago, III.; Tom 
Pulliam Comonche, Tex.; Dave 
Moffett and Jim McCluskey, Trini- 
dad, Colo.; Rorer of Salida, Colo.; 
Edwni Johnson of Glenwood Spr- 
ings, Colo.; Clarence Baise, Vona, 
Colo.; James Waddell and Charles 
Kintz, Loveland, Colo.; Virgil Mc- 
Clurg, Cedaredge, Colo.; Roy And- 
erson, Leadville, Colo.; Ivan Sch- 
weninger, La Junta, Colo.; Duane 
Branch, Dividend, Utah; Lemar 
Hill, Thistle, Utah; Owens, Rand- 
lett, Utah; Marvin Engbreitson, Joe 
Brady, Trent Nichols, Charles Bar- 
nes, Harold Rahm, Samuel Larison, 
Raymond Ryan and Byron Whaley, 
Colorado Cprings; Bill Baker, Bill 
Beatty, Robert Rorark, L. de Hol- 
zer and Stanley Ryerson. 



Perhaps you freshmen 
don't know how refreshing 
Mowry's Ice Cream really is. 

Well just follow the Soph's 
and learn for yourselves what 
a delicious treat is in store 
for you. 

Have it some way every 
day. 



MoWRY'S 



"You're Sure They're Pure'" 

Derngood 
Caramels 
35c a Pound 

As a feature for the 
first Saturday o f the 
School Year we offer 
this famous Derngood 
Crndy — assortment in- 
cluding those with 
cream center layer. 



26 S. TEJON 



Dern's 



Broken Lenses Duplicated 

Save the Pieces 

Eyes examined Lenses Grour 




THE LAUTERMAN-DUGAN 
JEWELRY AND OPTICAL CO. 

Jewelers, Optometrists and 
Mfg. Opticians 

Fine Watch, Clock and Jewelry 
Repairing 

121 N. TejonSt. Phone Main 67^ 



When you consider that you 
can purchase any make type- 
writer on monthly payments 
as small as $5.00 it is not a 
question of affording it. 

The essential question is if 
you can afford to be without 




125 N. Tejon 



Main 95 



THE TIGER 



11 



See Their Smartness 
Enjoy Their Comfort 




The new Styles in Ladies' Fall Footwear — Blue, Black and 
Brown Kid, Patent Suede, Satin and Velvets. Spike, baby 
French, and Cubon heels. Very moderately priced — 
$5.00 to $7.50 

I 1 1 East Pikes Peak SEE WINDOW DISPLAY 



BUILDING supplies of course include at the same time every- 
thing used in repairs, improvements, etc., with Mill Work 
of the highest class workmans,hip. 

CRISSEY-FOWLER 

LUMBER COMPANY 



117 W. Vennijo 



Main 101 




^thx^ilP=* 



Announcing 

The removal, on October first, nineteen 

twenty-nine, of 

The Robert Mills Company 

to their new location at 
111 East Pikes Peak Avenue 

Main 5500 



^o^tfmJXk 



WELCOME TIGERS — We greet the 
old and the new — We carry a complete line 
of school equipment — Notebooks — text 
books — pens — crested stationery, etc. — 
The meeting place of C. C. students for 
more than 20 years. 

TheJvlURRAY 
Drug Co. 

21 S. Tejon 832 N. Tejon 

Across from the Campus 



Phone Main 4671 



831 North Tejon 



A. L. STARK 

TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 



COLORADO SPRINGS 



SUPERIOR 



Telephone 1364 



Dry Cleaning Co. 



129 N. Tejon 



Good Plumbing and Heating 

Get an estimate on your next job 

J. C.ST. JOHN 

PLUMBING ^ HEATING COMPANY 



226 N. Tejon St. 



B 



AKER 

Automatic Oil 
URNER 



M. 48 



BUY YOUR SUPPLIES 
AT COLLEGE STORE 

— and have a good time 
with the difference 

Tigers and Tigeresses will find at the College store a full line of 
School Supplies, including note book covers, fillers, bound note 
books, pencils, fountain pens, drawing sets, in fact everything 
you will need at a saving in price. The geunine I. P. covers and 
fillers included in the line. Come here first. Your patronage 
will be appreciated. 



12 



THE TIGER 



WELCOME 




Tie.BR 




We cordially welcome you to ColoradolCol- 

lege and Colorado Springs and extend to 

you a sincere invitation to call on us 



THE COLLEGE INN 

MURRAY DRUG CO. 

THE COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

THE COLLEGE CLEANERS 

THE DENTAN PRINTING CO. 

BOOSTERS CLUB 

MANHATTAN RESTAURANT 
14 East Pikes Peak 

THE COLO. SPORTING GOODS CO. 

THE PEERLESS FURNITURE CO. 



WULFF SHOE CO. 

KAUFMAN'S 

THE DEAL SHOE CO. 

BOXLEY COLE MOTOR CO. 

INDESTRUCTO LUGGAGE SHOP 
14 N. Tejon 

TUCKER DODSON CLOTHING CO. 

THE SINTON DAIRY CO. 

COSSITT DINING HALL 

PERKINS-SHEARER 

PLAZA DINING ROOM 




i^l 




Ob€ Colorado College ^^ 

IICilBlllJ 

OfJicial Students Publication 




VOLUME XXXII 



Number 2 







Editorial Office— 23 Wcit Colorado Ave. 



September 27, 1929 



THE TIGER 




copywGHT)929 sothmoor 



ROTHMOOR COATS 

Here's warmth in a coat^ 
and smart style, too 

This is Rothmoor's football 
coat / it*s tailored of warm, 
winter-proof Boucles/it's the 
kind of a coat a girl wears to 
school and college ^ to business 
/in her car/it*s so smart and 
practical, she can wear it 
everywhere* 

I'ur Trimmed Coats $59.50 and Upwards. 



6 East Pikes Peak Avenue 



Dine anJ Dance 

a/THE COLLEGE INN 



i $25 $30 $35 $40 $45 $50 $55 $60 

I When you order your clothes Custom-made you 

I not only suit your own taste but you pick out 

I your own price. 

I Settle which of the above prices you prefer and we'll show 

I you a fine assortment of beautiful fabrics at your own figure. 

! TOMPKINS-LEOPOLD CLOTHES SHOP 

i 123!^ N. Tejon 



J ( 
{ j 

i i 

i i 

• • 

i i 

r t 
• • 

i i 
11 

• » 

n 
II 

^ ....... 



Write your friends on 

Crested 
Stationery 

Murray's have a complete line of station- 
ery with the Crest of your Fraternity or of 
the College. 

Drug Co. 

Across from the Campus 



PICCLYaWICCLY 



ALL OVER THE WORLD 

FIVE BUSY STORES IN 

COLORADO SPRINGS 



Issued Friday of each week. Entered at the Post 



Knoor's Market 

FOR YOUR PARTIES OR PICNICS 

Let us supply you with 
I I good things to eat 

♦ I 123 North Tejon Phone 2602 . 

Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter. 



VOLUME XXXII 



C. C. WEEKLY NEWS MAGAZINE 



Number 2 



FRESHMEN ANNUAL RGNT 
KEEPS SOPHS UP ALL NITE 

Southard's Assembly Talk Stirs 

Class of 1933 To Keep Alive 

College Traditions 



An unexpected and unheralded 
war between the freshmen and the 
sophomores last Thursday night 
gave the city of Colorado Springs 
; n unusual treat, when several 
prominent sophs were forced to pa- 
rade the streets, minus trousers and 
other apprrel. The cool evening 
air was not particularly pleasing to 
the second year men, but the fresh- 
men's blood was at the boiling 
point, due to the recent announce- 
ment by the Student Council that 
the annual and traditional Fresh- 
men-Sophomore Flag Rush would 
n?t be held this year because of the 
refusal of the sophomores to par- 
ticipate. 

Fmding themselves successful 
and wholly victorious m their first 
attempts, the freshmen scoured 
fraternity houses in their wild 
search for sophomores. But t h e 
wise sophomores disappeared as by 
magic! One victim was left be- 
hind in the soph's dash for free- 
dom, and he was promptly thrown 
into the lake in Monument Park. 

The Sophomores had not given 
up the battle, with the loss of the 
first skirmish, and between two and 
four o'clock in the morning, they 
rushed down from the Mesa, where 
they hrd been awaiting develop- 
ments. Pouncing upon the sleep- 
ing frosh, the sophomores wreaked 

(Continued on page 10) 



Washburn Fence 



A wire fence is now being con- 
structed around Washburn Field. 
Due to the fact that numerous peo- 
ple have slipped through the gym- 
nasium gate without paying admis- 
sion, it was necessary to take some 
steps to prevent their doing it. The 
fence is being strongly built wdth 
steel poles laid in concrete and with 
a heavy wire mesh material. Not 
only will unwanted visitors be kept 
from the field, but the new fence 
will offer a pleasing surrounding 
for the field. Work is being rap- 
idly pushed forward as Coach Van 
de Graaff wishes to use his short 
practice time to the best advantage 
by secret sessions. 



Football Season 
Opens Saturday 

The football season in Colorado 
Springs will be opened by the ap- 
pearance on Washburn Field of 
two of the leading prep school 
teams. The Colorado Springs 
Terrors will oppose the North Den- 
ver Vikings in a non-league contest 
tomorrow afternoon at two o'clock. 

The Denver school has a reputa- 
tion for putting strong teams on the 
field and there is no reason to be- 
lieve that this year should be an ex- 
ception. 

The Terrors, although green, 
have weight and great possibilities. 
The locals should have a good scor- 
ing combination in Cotter, Coe, 
Glidden, and Beery. Beery is a 
brother of Arlie Beery, star end on 
the 1928 Tiger team. Spirit is at 
a high pitch in both camps and a 
good game seems inevitable. 



SOCIETY COUNCIL FORMS 
RULES FOR ALL PLEDGING 



The pleding of the Women's So- 
cieties this semester will be held on 
October third. Bids will be given 
out on Wednesday, October second, 
; nd all replies must be in the hands 
of the secretary of the Inter-Society 
Council by the time stated on the 
bids. The rushing of prospective 
members must be deferred until 
midnight of October the third. 

Since the revision of the inter- 
society council constitution, the re- 
quirements for membership in t h e 
girls' societies have been changed. 

According to the new constitu- 
tion, in order to be academically 
el.gible for a society, a girl must be 
classified as a full sophomore, jun- 
ior, or senior. She must have at- 
tended C. C. one semester prior to 
election. Her scholars,hip average 
must be 75 after the first semester 
of her freshman year. 

To be eligible socially, sopho- 
more or new girls must have taken 
p' rt in at least one of the college 
activities listed below, each activity 
counting one-half point. Juniors or 
seniors must have taken part in at 
least two of the r.ctivities; or must 
have, in the unanimous opinion of 
he Council, special qualifications 
that would make her a valuable 
member of a society. This rule 
should be used only in exceptional 
cases. No girl is eligible who has 
lost her social privileges three times 

(Continued on i)age 5) 



COSSiTT HALL FIRST GYM OF 

ITS KINDJN UNITED STATES 

Building Combines Dining Hall, Lounge Rooms, 

Office Space, And Physical Culture Plant; 

Is Newest Building On Campus 



C. C. WOMEN COME 

FROM MANY CITIES 



The geographical distribution of 
the women of the college is rather 
imposing. The following Colorado 
cities, towns and hamlets are rep- 
sented: Greeley, Ft. Collins, Kio- 
wa, Ft. Morgan, Brush, Grand 
Junction, Paonia, Monte Vista, Sa- 
guache, Pueblo, Denver, Canon 
City, Las Animas, Trinidad, Man- 
cos, Igracio, and Ordway. Out of> 
Colorado the distribution is as fol- 
lows: Scottsbluff, Nebraska; Ard- 
more, Oklahoma; Claude, Texas; 
Rapid City, South Dakota; Fred- 
ericksburg, Texas; Omaha, Nebras- 
ka; Wisconsin, Idaho, Salt Lake, 
Utah; Huma, Wyoming; Linden, 
California; and Amarillo, Texas. 

If the weaker sex could dare to 
come so far, what of the men! 



Boosters' Club Makes 
Drive For New Members 



With the opening of school the 
Boosters club launched a campaign 
I mong the alumni of Colorado Col- 
lege and interested business men to 
increase membership. About four 
hundred men in Colorado and i n 
less temperate regions now hold 
membership cards as evidence o f 
their loyalty and enthusiasm for the 
Tigers. The chief activity of t h e 
Boosters is the making of small 
loans and securing work for stu- 
dents whose college careers would 
otherwise be cut short or protracted 
over a long period of leaving and 
reentering school. Affiliation with 
the C. C. Boosters is the only tan- 
gible way in which graduates and 
friends of the Tigers can lend their 
support. Each year's increase of 
membership swells the revolving 
fund, part of which is kept out on 
the notes of reliable and thorough- 
ly investigated students, so that at 
present the club handles something 
over $1600 in student loans, ac- 
cording to Mr. D. T. Burge, of the 
membership committee. 



Cossitt Hall at the time of i t s 
erection in 1912, at a cost of 
$100,000, was unique among col- 
lege buildings in that it combined 
features which were found in no 
other college building in the United 
States. Since then similar build- 
ings have been constructed on the 
campuses of some of the best col- 
leges and universities in America. 
It contains not only an indoor and 
an outdoor gymnasium, with all 
equipment necessary for sound 
physical development, but also a 
dining room and commons room, 
each accommodating three hundred 
persons. 

Frederick H. Cossitt made t h e 
endowment to Colorado College for 
the construction of the hall which 
was dedicated in his honor on the 
condition that the fraternities of 
the College should give up their 
dining rooms and eat at this new 
dining hall. The college has re- 
quired that freshmen and sopho- 
mores should eat at Cossitt. The 
reason for this regulation is not 
only to make sure that the condi- 
tions of the endowment are ful- 
filled, but also to provide a means 
by which the students of the col- 
lege may get acquainted and asso- 
ciate with one another. This sys- 
tem is a big help toward the demo- 

( Continued on page 9) 



Frosh Football 



Leo Roessner, freshman football 
coach, has announced that t h e 
freshmen team will play at least 
three inter-collegiate contests this 
fall. It is probable that at least one 
more game will be scheduled. The 
tentative date card calls for a game 
with University of Denver, at Den- 
ver, on the first of November; 
Western State, at Gunnison, on 
Armistice Day, or perhaps the pre- 
ceding Saturday; and Grand Junc- 
tion Junior College, at Grand Junc- 
tion, on Thanksgiving Day. Plans 
will probably be arranged so that 
the Baby Tigers shall meet Fort Lo- 
gan. 



THE TIGER 



FROSH WOMEN LEARN IN 
PERIOD OF PROBATION 



Proving an exception to the gen- 
eral rule, girls of the Freshman 
Class stood up bravely under the 
week's deadly "Reign of Terror" 
imposed upon them by the Sopho- 
mores. 

Any Freshman class is supposed 
to possess certain distinctive char- 
acteristics, an outstanding timidity, 
a fear of the great life o fcollege, 
and an evidence of awe in the pres- 
ence of a Sophomore. But for a 
week the class of "33" withstood 
as defiantly as any prisoner of old 
the impositions of the Sophomores. 
Only Thursday night did they hear 
and heed their "Master's Voice." 

Freshmen should have worn 
green ribbons floating on high. 
Freshmen didn't. Freshmen should 
have had no dates Freshman week. 
Freshmen did. Freshmen ignored 
commands of lordly Sophomores. 
Freshmen must suffer. 

Thursday evening clapped the 
climax. Paddles were heard and 
felt that night out in the quad- 
rangle, which swarmed with blind- 
folded victims and flaming ama- 
zons. 

It was a task to subdue such a 
class to something like an ordinary 
Freshman group, a task which did 
not daunt the Sophomores who 
saw their duty and did it nobly. 
The result is that all the Freshmen 
are and ever will be, is due to the 
Sophomores. 

It was then truly a gentle and 
docile group who, saddened, and 
wiser, returned to the fold. High 
school conceit was well hidden. 
Freshmen carry lolly-pops, wear a 
different colored sock on each foot, 
and wear green ribbons in their 
hair. So now after that week of 
rules and regulations, Freshmen are 
finally and duly initiated and are a 
part of Colorado College. 



TIGER POSITIONS 

There will be a short meet- 
ing for all those interested in 
working on the "Tiger", the 
college newspaper, during the 
next semester at Ticknor 
Study on Friday evening, 
Sept. the twenty-sixth, at 
seven-thirty. This meeting 
will be for candidates of both 
the editorial and manager 
staff. There will be only a 
small staff chosen this year, 
and it behooves everybody 
interested to come out on Fri- 
day evening for the new staff 
will be picked immediately. 



Murray Habit 
Is Caught By 
Zealous Girls 



It's remarkable how long it takes 
a green freshman class to get on 
to the hand of the difficult lessons 
at college, but we see them eating 
up the collegiate patter in less time 
than it takes to set up a portable 
bungalow, which is quite a short 
period. 

Already we find the Murray .hab- 
it an institution with our fair co- 
eds and their gallant swains. We 
dash into the college hang-out for 
a confidential talk with some, dear, 
old friend of two or three years and 
the booths are all filled with green 
hair ribbons, cigarette smoke, and 
bad language. In all three of t h e 
booths are found one, two, or three 
freshman girls looking pretty and 
expressing distress until some Galla- 
had nonchalantly saunters over to 
pay the bill for the inevitable 
"coke" and listens to exclamations 
of delight over the little button 
which adorns his collegiate sweater 
in a fantastic manner. If the knight 
errant happens to be an upperclass- 
man the delight is a little more real 
and the young woman expresses a 
little more the sophisticated atti- 
tude, for upperclassmen always 
make better bait for the wily wom- 
en. You know there is a certain 
distinction in being seen with one 
of the "powers that be" upon the 
campus, or with one of the bad 
men, or even with that greasy in- 
dividual, the fraternity politician. 

We can predict the next few 
months for these little butterflies. 
For the time being, they will play 
one man against the other and be 
the most popular woman on the 
campus. Then their cortege will 
dwindle and in a wild attempt to re- 
gain some of the lost popularity, 
they will pick the most likely of the 
suckers for the winner. (Perhaps so, 
but we think that he is the loser!) 
Then will come one round of dates 
with the man of their choice, walks 
under the soft caressing moonlight 
of the Jungle, frolics at two-fifty a 
plate together with a boiled shirt, 
parked cars with little, meaningless 
nothings whispered softly softly in 
an available ear, etc. ad infinitum. 
Then one morning a new pin will 
be seen at the Halls, cigars will be 
passed around, and another man 
will think that, having won a vic- 
tory, he deserves a rest. Then will 
follow a month of neglect. The en- 
gagement will be broken and the 
girl will have to content herself 
with a few dates here and there in 
much the same fashion as the older 
women of the campus. Thus ends 
the love tale. 



FROSH MEN WILL DON 
YELLOW CAPS TUESDAY 



The traditions of Colorado Col- 
lege decree that the frosh shall soon 
be wearing their new head pieces. 
These smart caps will be bright yel- 
low, charmingly set off with a 
beautiful purple button, artistical- 
ly placed on the top. 

These caps must be worn by all 
frosh men at all times, except while 
in bed or at Cossitt Dining hall. 
They must be worn until Washing- 
ton's Birthday. Any freshman 
caught without his cap will be pun- 
ished severely. It is rumored that 
quite frequently paddles play a big 
part in such cases. 

Freshmen may get their cards at 
at assembly Tuesday. These cards 
will then entitle them to a cap at 
Bcxrnes-Woods. The price of t h e 
cards will be only seventy-five 
cents. 



Firemen Aid Co-eds 

Are you afraid of fires? 

The girls in the dormitories aren't 
anymore because they know just 
what to do in cases like that. And 
no less an authority than the fire- 
chief and his squad told them about 
it. You see, it was this way: Sat- 
urday morning the chief and his 
men came down to the quad in 
their little red car. At nine o'clock 
the fire alarm made a terrible 
noise and the girls got out of the 
halls in record time (due partially 
to the fact they had been told just 
when all this would happen). After 
they had learned how to work an 
extinguisher, they all went back in- 
side; and then evolution was 
proved anew when they came down 
the fire escapes of each hall. The 
descent was made with varying de- 
grees of speed and agility, depend- 
ing upon the experience of the in- 
dividual in such matters! 

Some of the girls felt that they 
should have been rewarded for 
their efforts, but instead it was the 
chief and his men who got t h e 
doughnuts and coffee after it was 
c.W over. 



Zetalethian Society 

To Build New House 



The new Zetalethian club house, 
located on Cache la Poudre street, 
will be the newest building to adorn 
the college campus. 

Mr. Charles H. Flynn was the 
designer end architect. The interior 
will be finished in natural shades 
to set off the hooded fireplace. 
Honoraries as well as alumnae and 
actives have taken an enthusiastic 
part in brining this retreat to pass. 



Gallager Chosen 
A. W. S, Treasure) 

The Associated Women Studenti 
of Colorado college held their firs 
assembly of the year, yesterda} 
morning in Perkins Hall. Randalir 
Trippel, president, welcomed t h t 
new women students of the college 
expressing the hope that they woulc 
enjoy their work at Colorado col- 
lege and that they would experience 
the satisfaction that comes o] 
achieving some lasting good for the 
school. "It is the desire of A. W 
S. to do at least one lasting thins 
every year that will make Colorad: 
college as proud of us as we are oj 
it," Miss Trippel said. 

The members of the legislative 
board of the A. W. S. were intro- 
duced after the new girls had beer 
welcomed. The legislative board 
as Miss Trippel explained in h e i 
opening speech, is responsible to al 
the girls of the school and is com- 
posed of their representatives. The 
members are Jo Hildrich, Maxine 
Moore, Margaret Gillen, Elizabeth 
Sweetman, Grace Perkins, Lois See- 
bt.ch, Helen Hagerman, Frances 
Gku, Sally Sheldon, Marjorie Fer- 
guson, and Marian Weinberger. 

A condensed report of the con- 
ference which the legislative boarc 
held at Chipita Park Sept. 14 and 
15, was given by the president, 
Questions discussed at the confer- 
ence included the relationship be- 
tween town and hall girls, ways to 
secure increased participation i n 
student activities, the assembly 
problem, college politics, the point 
system, "The Tiger", and problems 
concerning freshmen girls. 

Before the meeting adjourneej 
Mary Gallager was elected treasur- 
er of the A. W. S. 



Glee Club Members Are 
Named By Mrs. Tucker 



For the past week, the women of 
Colorado College have been trying 
out for the Glee Club. Mrs. Fan- 
ny Tucker has been in charge ol 
the try-outs. Practice will begin 
on Monday afternoon at four-thirtj 
in Perkins Hall. 

Margaret Rhoads, Marge South- 
mayd, Gail Dein, Helen Huffman 
Alice Gillet, Rasella Burbank, anc 
Frances War have been chosen foi 
the first sopranos. 

Marian McCleary, Cora Koen- 
necke, Helen Hummel, and Wil- 
moth Harris were chosen second so- 
pranos. 

Margaret Walever, Elinor Mc- 
Cleary, and Mry Bloom won part; 
in the first alto. 

Gladys Johnston, Jessie Fuson 
i nd Frances Smith were chosen sec- 
ond altos. 



THE TIGER 



Freshman Girls Are Now Out to 
Get Their Men So Report States 

Gather round folks, gather round and just let me slip you a little 
of the dirt I've gathered from my experiences and squanderings with 
3 and 30 discarded ribs which have just entered this mecca of learning. 

First let me introduce myself. Now understand, I'm no football 
hero. Neither do I resemble any of these old Greek busts. I'm just 
one of the many old men around the campus who can look back and 
remember six or eight years ago 



when he was a frosh. Me and my 
pal Frankie Peters, with the aid of 
my hack, Old Rusty, have just con- 
cluded a series of problems in fresh- 
men research work. Hence we are 
making public here, for the first 
time the results: 

The first of these was Anabelle. 
I hrnd-picked her from a big and 
classy field when I was down mo- 
biling my carcass around the big 
horkum foundry of Cossitt Hall to 
see what I'd fizzle the next semes- 
ter. Well folks, she made me so 
dizzy that I grabbed two advanced 
Math courses, an English History, 
and two Psychs, and then gave 
them a bad check for my tuition. 
But I got a date! 

Next eve Frankie and I breezed 
over where she lived and out she 
popped with another twist named 
Jean, all set for my little friend. 
We took in a show, and a drug- 
store, and after an hour or two of 
what-will-you-have rolled the girls 
back to their hogan. After conclud- 
ing ceremonies were over, Frankie 
and I took an invoice and found 
that we were out $8 so next morn- 
ng we sought fresh fruit to pick. 

One of my big hearted frat 
brothers then introduced me to 
Fannie. She was a big brunette 
-nd grabbed hold of me like a pro- 
fessional wrestler. She was well 
trained for after we had held a fif- 
teen-round tete a tete with she and 
her second, Ethel, we swort off the 
big game for life and there after 
armed ourselves with blackjacks. 

Then's when Georgia caught me. 
Say folks, Georgia was one of those 
demure little monastery girls, you 
know, nun of this and nun of that, 
but she completely shelved me for 
the time being with that big sister 
hooey. Then one night I caught 
her wileing away the time on some 
Phi Beta Theta so I took my tools 
.' nd went away. 

For a whole day I never even 
looked at the prospects till Frank- 
ie caught me in a moment of weak- 
ness and lied me up with one of 
his Stupid Susan's big mock ma- 
chines. In rapid succession the 
pirce was cluttered up with Char- 
lottes, and Mabels, rnd Graces et 
cetera. Frnally, since Frankie was 
undiplomatic one night, his Love 
Punch lei the air out of his casing 
.-nd left him flat. 

(Continuod on puBc 9) 



SOCIETY PLEDGING 



(Continued from page 3) 
in the semester previous to her elig- 
ibility for social pledging. 

Activities which count as one- 
half a social credit: I. Koshare — 
member, officer, manager, costum- 
er; 2. Glee Club for one semester; 
3. Euterpe; 4 S. G. Board; 5. Pan 
Pan; 6. Eta Sigma Phi; Class of- 
ficer; 8. Tiger staff or office work; 
9. Nugget staff; 10. Members of 
the W. A. A. Board; II. All girls 
having 100 W. A. A. points; 12. 
Committees appointed by the A. S. 
C. C; 13. Members of the Student 
Council of the A. S. C. C; 14. 
Members of the House Boards ( ex- 
cept the President) ; 1 5. Winners 
of the English Department Prizes; 
16. May Fete: Head of a Commit- 
tee; 17. Colonial Ball: Minuet; 18. 
Debating: member of the squad; 

19. Officers of the Riding Club; 

20. Individual recital of the School 
of Music; 21. Part in a class play; 
22. Part in Eager Heart; 23. Ger- 
man Club; 24. Orchestra member- 
ship; 25. Officer in the sponsors- 
organization; 26. Active leadership 
as Captain or Lieutenant of a Girl 
Scout Troop; and 27. Leader of a 
Girl Reserve group. 

No pledging shall be held before 
the Thursday of the third week of 
each semester, nor after the end of 
the Thanksgiving and Spring vaca- 
tions. After the first pledging, any 
society wishing to pledge a girl must 
petition the Inter-Society Council. 
The Council is to grant this peti- 
tion, unless for some reason the girl 
is ineligible for pledging. The Sec- 
retary is to keep a careful record 
of all such petitions. 

A girl needs to be passed by only 
one of the four societies to make 
her eligible for pledging. 

Each society shall submit a list 
of the girls passed to the council 
the Tuesday of the week of t h e 
first pledging. The society is to 
pass only on girls it is willing to 
trke. This list can have no more 
names on it than the society has 
vacrncies. No girl can be passed 
by an society within 24 hours of 
the last meeting of the council on 
the day of the first pledging. 

Each girl who has been passed 
on by one or more societies is to 
receive a note from the secretary of 

(Continued on vo-ge 7) 




The world is round — but 
it looks flat to us. 

Everything old fashioned is 
out of Kilter. 

Unless you are on to the 
ropes — you are soon on the 
rocks. 

If your game is defective 
you must change your boot- 
legger. 

Until you know your on- 
ions, you cannot cop the 
bacon. 

A good man of yesterday 
is replaced by a better man 
today. 

It ain't what you "used to 
was" — but what you can do 
now. 

With the above prelude let 
us "introduction" ourselves, 
our business and our Ideals. 



:/ 



Mr. College Man: — meet 

FURMBILT CLOTHES 



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\. Visit our Springs Store at 20 N. Teion St. /" 
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THE TIGER 



EDITORIAL 




THE TIGER 
Member of Rocky Mountain Inter-Coliegiate Press Association 

The Colorado College Newspaper, Published Weekly by the Students. 



LLOYD H. ELLIS _ Editor 

Main 1975 

JAMES PATTERSON ..Manager 

Main 2575 



The editor wishes to acknowledge the valuable help which he re- 
ceived in editing and writing his first issue of the Tiger. He especially 
expresses his grateful thanks to Jim Keyser and Barratt O'Hara, and to 
Clifford Goodson, Bill Baker, Velma Rose, Hartley Murray, Archie Hess, 
Ivan Schweninger, Genevieve Engel, Fred Nichols, Wayne Campbell, 
Mark Perkinson, Margery Barkley, Helen Hageman, Gale Middlestetter, 
Stewart Wilson, Eugene Lague, Jo Campbell, and Ellsworth Richards, 
for their assistance. 

These students will probably be the nucleus for this year's Tiger 
Staff. The last issue of the Tiger is a complete change over the Tigers 
of previous years. In former years, it has been the policy of the editors 
to have a large staff of reporters. Students, who wrote one article, 
was given a position on the staff; women, who needed social credits, 
were recommended freely. With the new ideas in regard to set up and 
the form of the new paper, certain plans concerning the number and 
duties of the staff have been made. A small staff will be in vogue this 
year. No person who earnestly gets out and work will be discriminated 
against, but reporters will be required to do a certain amount of work 
each week. A journalism class has been formed which will work on the 
Tiger under the direct supervision of Mr. J. L. Lawson who has had 
extensive practical experience in various newspapers throughout the 
country. Naturally, the schedule of many students could not be made 
to include this journalism course. Reporters do not necessarily need 
to take this course of study. 

The ability to make the staff will not depend alone upon the abil- 
ity of the student, but how earnest and reliable he is will be a large 
factor in making selections. The appointment of a man on the staff 
does not necessarily mean a regular position. If he looses enthusiasm 
or goes into a slump, he will be cut from the staff. A meeting will be 
held according to announcement elsewhere in the paper, and a good 
start would help a great deal in securing an editorship. 



The position of the editor of a college publication is indeed an un- 
certain one. He stands between the student body, the administration, 
and people interested in the college. One person has said that he in- 
terprets the feeling of the faculty to the students and the ideas of the 
students to the administration. 

The lot of a person standing between the administration and the 
student body is a hard one. He may write according to the dictates of 
the administration and be scorned by his fellow students. He may write 
about the opinions of the students and be called before the Dean. 

The Colorado College Tiger is the official publication of the Asso- 
ciated Students of Colorado College. It is their paper. To carry on the 
purpose for which it has been established, the editor must haev the full 
cooperation of the student body and the faculty. 

When a student does not understand the position of the administra- 
tion or the administration does not understand the studenst, it is his 
job to ask questions. The columns of the Tiger will always be open to 
campus opinion. Any member of the faculty or any students will be 
given full access to the columns of the paper. Naturally, no cnony- 
mous article which would stir up bitter controversies will be printed. 
It is the desire of the editor that any difficulties will be ironed out by 
giving every person a chance to state his side of the question. 



CHAPEL 

What a thrill, for some, the first 
assembly brings. As I gazed around 
Perkins yesterday morning, I 
couldn't help but chuckle to my- 
self. Here was the new queen of 
the campus (at least, she felt that 
way about the little matter) sur- 
rounded by a group of "cookie 
pushers" giving the new "best look- 
ing girl in school" the first rush. 
I'm really going to wait until her 
popularity dies down, because I'd 
hate to get my toes trampled on in 
the rush to her place of residence. 
Well, have a good time, sister, be- 
cause they come and go rather 
quickly. 

The next observation of any im- 
portance was the new president 
who takes his place among the 
usual wisecracks of the campus 
clowns. Some of these boys really 
ought to join the Ringling Bros.; 
I'm sure they would go over big. 
After the new executive's face had 
changed to a more normal color, 
although it still looked like the set- 
ting sun, he managed to utter a few 
ejaculations which sounded more or 
less like a lecture from one of our 
favorite professors. Before assem- 
bly was over, however, our new 
leader had hit the stride of our re- 
tiring president by saying the wrong 
thing at the right time. It's all 
right, Glen, we all like to laugh. 

Then, came the dawn and the an- 
nouncement that all freshmen men 
should wait until after assembly. 
They waited because they hadn't 
been taught better. One poor, lit- 
tle boy looked so homesick. I know 
he must have had about the same 
feelings as Brother Daniel had up- 
on going to set up house keeping 
with a group of the larger felines. 
Here was one who wasn't a bit wor- 
ried. He looked like the big needle 
and thread man from so and so and 
the way he staggered around 1 
thought he had already gotten on 
to some of our bad habits. 

"On with the gauntlet was t h e 
next cry. This is a really danger- 
ous sport. Not for the Frosh but 
because the upperclassmen are im- 
perilling the dignity and their hon- 
or by trying to hold up their pants 
without belts. 

I guess that now I've said enough. 



THE WIND AND THE SONG 
I sang a song at evening 
Which only the wind could hear. 
I bade him waft it gently 
To a rustic cottage near. 
I He hummed it over softly. 
With a twinkle in his eye; 
Then he purred off down the val 

ley 
And stopped at the hut close by. 
He sang it through the window 
To a maiden sitting there. 
And she listened to him quietly; 
Then asked where he learned the 

air. 
i-Ic pcinted to my hilltop 
And showed me standing near; 
So she sweetly called an answer — 
Which only the wind could hear. 
JEAN GUILLAUME. 



Those electing Advanced Amer- 
ican History courses will please 
meet Professor Hulbert in the Office 
of the Stewart Commission in t h e 
library, between three and five 
o'clock, any day except Saturday. 



EDITORIAL CONTEST 
Last year, near the end of the 
first semester, a prize was offered 
for the best editorial of the year, 
whether it was submitted to the 
Tiger or written by one of the staff. 
It was hoped that in this way an 
interest might be shown in editorial 
work and progress could be made 
along this line. The donor pre- 
ferred to keep his identity secret. 
The contest closed the first of May 
last year and it is believed that the 
prize will be awarded soon. 

The committee of award consists 
of Professor Daehler, Chairman, 
Professor Binkley, Assistant Profes- 
sor Amanda Ellis, and Miss Jamie 
Ross of the class of '29. 

Two prizes were offered — one 
for ten dollars for the best editorial 
on a subject of college interest, an- 
other for fifteen dallars for an edi- 
torial on a subject of general inter- 
est. According to the rules of the 
contest any editorial written by a 
member of the staff and published 
in the Tiger was eligible for the 
competition. 



TEN O'CLOCK CHAPEL 
It's too hard to get up in the 
morning just for chapel, if we 
could be made to get up for class 
and have chapel come sometime 
when we had nothing else to do we 
might attend. Thus spoke a good- 
ly number last year. Now they 
will have to find some other excuse 
fcr their lack of religion. For chap- 
el has been moved up to 10 o'clock 
and classes begin at 8 A. M. as 
ec.rly as it is. 

This service is still voluntary but 
you must attend assembly either 2- 
4-6 or 8 times a month at which 
time speakers of note will talk to 
you or it will be the student body 
president. 



THE TIGER 



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is 
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Sugar the essential food. 

HOLLY SUGAR 
CORPORATION 



Quality 

Cleaners and Dyers 

SUITS, O'COATS 

HATS $1.25 

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DUTCH I 

for touchdowns and DUTCH ? 

(Hammond) for new driver- I 

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New Fords 7c per mile; | 

30c per hour. i 

New Cheve 6 to 8c per mile; ? 

35c per hour. I 

Office i 

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Phones M. 346 and 2065 | 

Free Delivery I 



WHY NOT 

Learn Typewriting 
while attending Col- 
lege? Your teachers 
will appreciate type- 
written work to be 
checked. We can ar- 
range hours to suit 
your convenience. 



"W 



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SOCIETY 



PLEDGES 

The fraternities take pleasure in 
announcing the pledging of the fol- 
lowing men who entered after reg- 
ular registration. This list is sup- 
plementary to the one in the last 
issue of "The Tiger." 

Beta Theta Pi 

Art Kelly, Los Angeles, Calif.; 
Ed Gray, Freehole, N. J. 
Delta Alpha Phi 

John Langum, Colorado Sprmgs; 
James Turner, Colorado Springs; 
Edward Gregory, Fountain; Don- 
ald Horton, Philadelphia, Penna.; 
Kenneth Peterson, Colorado 
Springs; Harry F. Wershing, White 
Mills, Penna.; W. M. Metzler, Colo- 
rado Springs; Richard Ellison, 
Colorado Springs. 

Kappa Sigma 

Jack Kintz, Loveland; Robert 
Tracy, Loveland. 

Phi Delta Theta 

"Doc" Gullic, Goodland, Kans.; 
Frank Randall, Kansas City, Mo.; 
Eugene Randall, Kansas City, Mo. 
Phi Gamma Delta 

Stephen Allison, Denver. 
Pi Kappa Alpha 

Liman Degeer, Colorado 
Springs; Robert Tucker, Chicago, 
III. Sigma Chi 

J. J. Vandemoor, Grand Junc- 
tion. 



SOCIETY COUNCIL FORMS 

(Continued from page 5) 

the Council stating: 

1 — Which socities have passed. 

2 — That she is to hand in a pref- 
erence list stating her first choice 
— if this society has passed her — 
or if she is willing to accept any 
other of the societies which have 
passed her, she is to name them in 
order. 

She is not to put down the name 
of any society that she is not willing 
to join. 

If no list is handed in, her name 
may be reconsidered. The prefer- 
ence lists shall be sealed and placed 
wherever the council note states, 
and then submitted by the Secre- 
tary to the council for action. 

In placing girls in societies only 
the choice of the girl will be con- 
sidered if the society of her choice 
has passed her. 

If a pledge is broken, the girl is 
ineligible for pledging for one year, 
dating from the time her pledge is 
broken. 

The limitation of the society 
membership is thirty. 

No formal rushing will be al- 
lowed, except the Freshman teas in 
The spring. 

There shall be no public demon- 
strations or congratulations in the 
dormitories, recitation halls, or the 
library. 



CONCERT 

At a special assembly Tuesday, 
a select concert will be given Colo- 
rado College by John Hausserman, 
a student at the college, and by Mr. 
Van Zandt, an artist of internation- 
al prominence and a friend of 
Hausserman's. The program will 
consist of duets with Hausserman 
at the organ and Van Zandt at the 
piano and of concert selections by 
Van Zandt. 

The latter gave a concert recent- 
ly in Colorado Springs which was 
pronounced by critics of music as 
very worthwhile and at present he 
is planning a tour of western states. 
The feature of the program will be 
Arrangements from Schuman in B 
Flat. This is a very difficult selec- 
tion and promises to be worthwhile. 

Two years ago, Hausserman at- 
tended Colorado College for the 
first time. During that year he 
wrote quite extensively for "Pot- 
ter's Clay", the old literary section 
of the Tiger. Last year was spent 
in the study of music at a conser- 
vatory in the East. He has gained 
an enviable reputation as a pianist, 
organist, composer, poet, and auth- 
or of fiction and has received rec- 
ognition for his talents in every 
section of the country. This fall he 
£.gain enrolled in the college and 
will, in all likelihood, help in edit- 
ing the new literary section of the 
Tiger. As was mentioned last issue, 
he has offered a fifty dollar prize 
for the best short story to encour- 
age literary achievement on the 
campus. 

Van Zandt has achieved note in 
his line. He comes of a famous 
musical family. His mother, Marie 
Van Zandt was the foremost prima 
donna of the famous musical 90's. 
In addition to his concert work, he 
has recorded for Victor Real Seal 
records. 



NEW PARTY PLACE 

During the summer the queen 
bees have been scheming and work- 
ing and soon the Zetalethian soci- 
ety is to ihave a new club house. 
They have built it next to the Min- 
erva and Contemporary houses so 
that they can get stags from other 
dances held on the same night. 

The society was started in April, 
1926 end have been holding their 
meetings in Ticknor study since 
that time. It is hoped that the 
.house will be completed by the 1st 
of October (We suspect in time to 
impress the incoming class). 

It will be much like the other 
three houses on the campus and 
will consist of a kitchen (most im- 
portant), a club room, and a cloak 
room. 



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The Trip that Bankrupts the 
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SPORTS 



FOOTBALL 



With two and a half weeks of 
hard practice behind them and the 
same amount of time left between 
now and the first game against the 
Colorado Aggies on October 12, the 
Colorado College Bengals are work- 
ing tooth and toe-nail toward de- 
.eloping a team that will start the 
season off with a victory against 
the Farmers and continue the tradi- 
tion of being "the most feared team 
in the Rocky Mountain confer- 
ence." 

With 25 men reportmg regularly 
for practice, the outlook is bright 
for a good season, and even though 
it may not win the conference gon- 
falon, the opponents will know that 
they've been through something 
when they get through. 

With one exception, the 1929 
schedule is advantageous to the 
Tigers, that exception being the an- 
nual clash between the Black and 
Gold and their ancient foe. Colo- 
re do University, at Boulder on No- 
vember 23. It will be State's home- 
coming. Meeting the Aggies th e 
very first game should prove an ad- 
vantage, and as to the game against 
Denver University at Denver the 
following week, the writer predicts 
a Jungle Cat victory, because of 
the traditional jinx the Tigers have 
on the Pioneers. The week follow- 
ing will be a tough one in prepara- 
tion for the Utah Farmers at Lo- 
gan, Utah. It will be a hard jour- 
ney and might bid fair for a re- 
verse turn for the Black and the 
Gold. Then on November 9, the 
Utah U. Red Devils invade the 
Tiger lair at Colorado College's 
Homecoming. The game should be 
a thriller, but no predictions are be- 
ing made this early as to the out- 
come. The. Boulder game previous- 
ly mentioned follows this and then 
on November 28, the Tigers meet 
the Colorado Mines, a comparative- 
ly weak team, at Pueblo to end the 
season. 

In order to find the best possible 
combination. Coach Van de Graaff 
has changed McGroryto center and 
John Cogr.n and Matheson to ends. 
Whether this will prove all right, he 
is not sure, because this is the first 
time that any of these men have 
played in the new positions. 

In the backfield, Clark, Ingra- 
ham, Irwm and Hartman seem to be 
working the best and Akin, the fast- 
est man on the squad, is fightmg 
hard to land a berth. "Ake's" un- 
crnny ability to side-step when he 
is toting the ball, and his ability to 
snrg passes out of the air are all 
in his favor, but his size and weight 
are against him. "Bully" has 



rcc-ched no definite coclusion as t( 
who will start yet. Pomeroy is al 
so looking good and will be a gooc 
man to jump in if Ingraham's trie! 
knee shou'd go back on him. Ken 
who was captain of last year'i 
Frosh eleven, is fast and a hard tac 
kler. He is also a good interfer 
ence man. 

The coaches have been groom 
ing Clark, Akin and Ingraham t( 
carry the ball while Irwdn, Hart 
man, and Pomeroy have been play 
ing in the wing back position as in 
terference men. 

In the line Hayden, Weaver, anc 
Cogcn, last year's players are show 
ing to advantage, while Southard 
Warning and Hill, last season's re 
serves, are fighting for positions 
From last year's freshman team 
Juan Reid, the two Starbuck broth 
ers, Leon and Elvis, and Chuck Mc 
Gory are looking awfully sweet. Al 
four of these men looke hke gocc 
bets for line berths, while McGror] 
and Elvis Starbuck are almost surt 
of places. 

Hard scrimmage is on the prO' 
gram every night at practice, anc 
che coaching staff is sitting up intc 
the wee sma' hours working oul 
plays. Altho no promises are beint 
made, prospects look bright for ar 
extra good year and a fast, hard- 
hitting team with lots of fight. 



CROSS COUNTRY TRACK 



Track Coach Jo Irish today is- 
sued an announcement of a cross- 
country run, to be held on Satur- 
day, October the twenty-sixth, i r 
which competition is open to all, 
and a prize will be awarded to the 
winner. In eastern schools, tihe 
cross-country run is the most im- 
portant free-for-all athletic event ol 
the yer.r, and it is expected that am- 
bitious Tigers will turn out by 
scores as in other schools, and 
make this annual trek an increas- 
ingly important affair in our calen- 
dar. The run will be over a course 
to be determined later, starting and 
ending at Washburn Field. It is 
expected to be three miles in length. 

Among the outstanding runners 
who have made known their inten- 
tion of entering the cross country 
run are Oscar Hammer and Charles 
Cogrn, distance runners of last 
year's Tiger track squad; Jim Ma- 
gruder, half miler; Bill Haney, 
quarter miler; and a number of 
freshmen about whom little is 
known. 

Ed Parker, track captain, stellar 
distance runner and junior A. A. 
U. champion, will be unable to 
compete because of his presence on 
the football squad. 



THE TIGER 



EVENTS 



NEW EDITOR 



Tuesday night, the publications 
committee met to consider filling 
the position of editor of the Tiger 
which was left vacant when Alvin 
Foote left school foe the first sewes- 
ter. Four names were recommend- 
ed by him before he left school: — 
Lloyd Ellis, Jim Keyser, Trellyen 
Nowels, and John Hausserman. A 
vote in this committee was taken 
end the two lowest men were elim- 
inated leaving Ellis and Keyser to 
be referred to the student council 
for election. The committee also 
recommended that the man appoint- 
ed hold office for the first semester 
only unless Foote failed to return 
to school. Th new style of t h e 
Tiger was also commended and the 
committee proposed that this sys- 
tem be continued. 

In the council meetnig which im- 
mediately followed, the recommen- 
dations of the committee were ac- 
cepted and the vote was taken on 
the two remaining candidates. Ac- 
cording to the vote, Ellis is to be 
editor for this semester. All the 
candidates were Juniors and three 
of them had had two years exper- 
ience on the paper under Margaret 
Kennedy, editor in '27 and '28, and 
George Jenks, '28 and '29. 



RHODES SCHOLARSHIP 



It is the privilege of Colorado 
College to nominate candidates for 
the Rhodes Scholarships. Although 
Colorado College is allowed three 
candidates, only one has been chos- 
en at the present time. Other stud- 
ents may apply for the scholarships 
but the applications should be 
handed to Dean Hershey at the 
Adminstration Building before the 
regular faculty meeting on October 
the fourth. The nominations are 
made by the faculty of the college 
and must be in the hands of the 
committee on election not later than 
October the twentieth, 1929. Any 
male student of Colorado College, 
who has completed his sophomore 
year of work in the college is el- 
igible to apply for the scholarship. 

Qualifications are based pri- 
marily on scholarship and leader- 
ship in college activities. The 
scholarship give the complete 
traveling and living expenses for 
study in some English college. At 
present, the Colorado district fel- 
low is Mr. Douglas McHendrie, Col- 
orado College, 1927. 



COSSITT 

(Continued from page 3) 

cratic feeling prevalent in the col- 
lege. 

Inspection has proved Cossitt 
Hall to be one of the cleanest eat- 
ing places in the vicinity of Colo- 
rado Springs. The meals served 
are not only prepared under t h e 
cleanliest conditions, but are unex- 
celled in quality. As Cossitt Hall 
is under the supervision of the col- 
lege, the prices are arranged so as 
to make it the most economical 
place for students to eat. The Hall 
is not run on a money-making ba- 
sis, the expenses, occasionally, ex- 
ceeding the income. 

Cossitt Hall is under the person- 
al supervision of Miss Dorothy Rob- 
erts, dietician for both Cossitt and 
Bemis Halls. The number of stu- 
dents eating there at present is 
about eighty. The work of wasbing 
dishes and waiting table is done by 
students who are in need of em- 
ployment to earn their way through 
school. 



FRESHMAN GIRLS 



(Continued from page 5) 

That night while we was stiff- 
arming our way down the thorofare 
we saw two refugees from Vasser 
standing on the curb. Knowing 
thrt they should not be out so late 
unaccompanied we asked them if 
they waited transportation and they 
accepted and announced Ticknor as 
their destination. There commenced 
a friendship which lasted till the 
end, about a week ago. At this 
time they arrived punctually late at 
the cell, and since then have been 
looking out from the internal re- 
gions. 

Following these little epics, 
Frankie and I decided to put the 
double XX on the frosh women. 
Here are our reasons, the big tips 
on this season's markets: 

They're loo expensive 

They're rough 

They're fickle 

They're stupid 

They're careless 

1 hey're - - - 
(Pardon me till I answer that 
telephone) . 

It's Frankie! He says that he 
h"s just discovered two more over 
a; McGregor that we overlooked! 
They're both blonds and hot? Woo- 
Woo, Woo-Woo. Excuse me for a 
few minutes folks, but I'd walk a 
mile with one for there's nothing 
quile so sweet as a freshman wom- 
|an. No Sir! 



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Same type of candy as 
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The feature for Satur- 
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Starts Saturday 

JOHN 
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The Shoe Shop 

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Have your hair cut in the 
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Pete's Barber Shop 

8 E. Cucharras St. 



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This week's Candy Special 

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new Chryslers. 



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COACH HERSTROM 



Guy Herstrom, who spent five 
years at Colorado College, played 
varsity football for three years and 
was coach of the Freshman togeth- 
er with Leo Roessner, and was 
Treasurer of the A. S. C. C. last 
year, is now football coach at Cen- 
tral High School of Pueblo. In ad- 
dition to his duties as coach Her- 
strom is teaching the General Sci- 
ence classes at that high school. 

Mrs. L. W. Fauteaux, Dean of 
Women, entertained the members of 
the Student Government Board at 
tea on Wednesday afternoon. Her 
guests were Sally Sheldon, Evelyn 
Stubblefield, Betty Hayden, Kath- 
erine Powell, Clydette Higginbottom 
Elizabeth Kennedy, and Eleanor 
Watts. 

Gene Mast, who graduated last 
June, left yesterday on a trip to 
China. Perhaps he will meet David 
Armstrong, who is workmg his way 
around the glob. 

Alvin Foote is sick in bed with 
an attack of the flu. Letters of 
cheer sent to 2218 Ash, street 
Denver, will reach him. 

The Crescent Club Halls girls 
were entertained at dinner, Monday 
evening, at the Cromwell Inn. Those 
present included: Catherine Herb- 
ert, Frances Willis, Virginia Easton, 
Myra Reinking, Constance Pos- 
lethwaite, Mildred Strachan, Alice 
Ireland, Josephine Campbell, and 
^dda Smith. 

Lamar Hill left this week for his 
home in Thistle, Utah because of 
his mother's illness. 






CADILLAC 

and 

CHRYSLER 

MOTORCARS 

Adams Motor Co. 

Marksheffel Building 



Miss Lavinia Gillis entertained at 
a picnic at Seven Falls on Thursday 
evening. 

TWITCHELL 
Alvin G. Twitchell is now coach- 
ing at Centennial High School of 
Pueblo. Twitchell was at one time 
basketball coach for B. Y. U. when 
they won their championship. From 
there he came to C. C. where he 
has been until this year. Here he 
Wc s Assistant Coach and Instructor 
of Physical Education. 

NOTICE 

In any case information which 
would be suited for the personal 
column is received the Tiger would 
welcome this news. 

The Minerva Society entertained 
at a beef steak fry in the Black 
Forest on Sunday. 

Miss Mildred Strachan will spend 
the next three weeks at Bemis 
Hall. 

Miss Alice Aaby has received 
four letters from Art Eastwood dur- 
ing the past week. Eastwood is now 
in Chicago, III. 

NOTICE 
All Societies and Fraternities 
must have their applications for 
dates on the Social Calendar in the 
hands of Virginia Dewey not later 
than October 7. 

Crescent club invites all freshman 
girls to a tea dance Saturday after- 
noon from 3 until 5 at the Minerva 
House. 

Frank Roberts, formerly of Col- 
orado College, has matriculated at 
the University of Illinois, Champ- 
aign, 111., where he will study mili- 
tary tactics. 



FRESHMEN ANNUAL FIGHT 



(Continued fi-om page 3) 

vengeance with paddles and ink. A 
large "32" was painted on every 
frosh brow. 

By Friday morning the battle ap- 
peared to be a draw. Once more 
the campus subsided into its usual 
serenity, to the great satisfaction of 
Juniors and Seniors, who momen- 
tairly feared that the other class 
might follow the example of t h e 
freshman and begin a general all- 
college war. 



Perhaps you freshmen 
don't know ,how refreshing 
Mowry's Ice Cream really is. 

Well just follow the Soph's 
and learn for yourselves what 
a delicious treat is in store 
for you. 

Have it some way every 
day. 



MoWRY'S 



Broken Lenses Duplicated 

Save the Pieces 

Eyes examined Lenses Ground 




THE LAUTERMAN-DUGAN 

JEWELRY AND OPTICAL CO. 

Jewelers, Optometrists and 

Mfg. Opticians 

Fine Watch, Clock and Jewelry 

Repdring 
121 N. Tejon St. Rhone Main 674 



4. 



4 



When you consider that you 
can purchase any make type- 
writer on monthly payments 
as small as $5.00 it is not a 
question of affording it. 

The essential question is if 
you can afford to be without 



T^ 




125 N. Tejon 



Main 95 



CHOCOLATES 
Good as Made 

Box Goods a Specialty 
WALLACE CANDY COMPANY 



Get your hair cut 
at the 

College 
Barber Shop 

Your patronage will be 
appreciated. 



THE TIGER 



11 




An Army of 65,000 

<-^'^^'^^- Loyal, 

Aggressive 
Employes 

AT 

YOUR 

SERVICE 

iHROUGHOUT the history 
of the world, happiness 
and progress have been 
based on Service. No institu- 
tion in our present-day civiliza- 
tion plays so vitally important a 
part as do our transportation 
agencies — and our railroads still 
are, and must continue to be, by 
far the most important transpor- 
tation factor. 

That IS the reason railroad 
men and women, generally, are 
such wonderfully fine people — 
because they have the knowl- 
edge that they are engaged in providing a service that is both 
necessary and very much worthwhile. In no other occupation is 
there greater opportunity for genuine service. 

Therefore, it must of necessity follow, that the most successful and progressive railroads 
are manned by employes who are most loyal, aggressive and progressive. It also follows 
that those railroads whose employes possess the finest esprit de corps, the highest morale, the 
greatest loyalty and aggressiveness, automatically become the most progressive and successful. 
Missouri Pacific Lines and Missouri Pacific employes both are fortunate. The entire sys- 
tem is manned by one of the finest organizations in the history of the world — and t h e 
Missouri Pacific army of 65,000 employes is following the standard of a successful and pro- 
gressive American institution. 

Result — the public benefits almost beyond measure. Every individual in the organization 
is fully aware of the importance of team work and there are few armies — even military or- 
ganizations — thc.t can exhibit the singleness of purpose; the effectiveness of concerted attack; 
the unanimous joy in achievement that motivates the Missouri Pacific Lines army. 

Shippers and travelers who have discovered these things have benefited and profited. Some 
have discovered them accidentally. Others he se purposely sought to test out the Missouri 
Pacific Army. Without exception t h e army has been found ready and willing to attack the 
largest or the smallest problem of the shipper and the traveler in order that the Missouri Pa- 
cific Lines might be of greatest possible service and so live up to the motto that is emblaz- 
oned on its banners and written indelbily in the hearts of all — A Service Institution. 

The Missouri Pacific Lines Army is proud of its railroad and the railroad is proud of its 
army. Both seek greater opportunities to be of service. 
I solicit your co-operation and assistance. 





President 



.W>ififilf^ 



mi 



**A Service I OS It Ho 1 ion" 



BUICK MOTOR CARS 



Strang's 



Harry D. MacDonald 
President 



T. J. Collier T. M. Colli 

V. L. Collier 

TheCOLLIER 

LUMBER CO. 

Phone Main 386 

543 W. Colorado Ave. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 



CITYCOAL 

15 East Pikes Peak Avenue 

Phone 

Main 67 or 120 



PAUDRE-PAUFFE 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Permanent Finger and Watei 

Waving 

Manicure and Scalp Treatments 

Marcels 50c. 



Photographs of our Colorado 
mountains. Nicely made — 
attractively colored by hand. 
Moderate in price — framed 
or unframed. 

H. L. STANDLEY 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs 



W. I. Lucas 

HAS 

EVERYTHING IN 

SPORTING GOODS 

"Tigers always welcome" 

119 N. Tejon St. 
Main 900 



12 



THE TIGER 



The Colorado Planing 
Mill Co. 

MILL WORK OF ALL 
DESCRIPTIONS 

PADDLES 
Frank Mitchell, Manager 

Phone 2876-W 
525 W. Colorado Ave. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Made in Colorado Springs 

VAN BRIGLE 
ART POTTERY 

The world's most famous 
art pottery. 



Visitors always welcome 




Pure Milk 



I PLAZA ! 

! DINING 
ROOM 

"The Place to Eat" t 



I Breakfast 

i 



Luncheon 



Dbner 



Say it with flowers 




30 N. Tejon Phone M. 214 



H 



OWARD'S 

BARBER 
SHOP 



19 East Bijou Street 



Rhone Main 1710 

IDEAL 

A CLEANERS 

5 West Colorado Ave. 



Valetor Pressing Service 



Quality Service 

Suits and Overcoats 
Cleaned and Pressed 



$1.00 






Jaundry 

V.'f Dru Cteaninq 






CORDUROY PANTS 



BLACK SWEATERS \ 



SUSPENDERS $1.00-$1.50 

Tucl^er-Dodson 



LEATHER JACKETS 



Ladies' 
Dresses 
Furs 
Gloves 
Hats 
Scarfs 
Etc. 



TOR YOUR CONVENIENCE' 

We Dry Clean 




"Phone us first" 
M. 2958 



Gents' 
Hats 

Topcoats 
Tuxedos 
Gloves 
Ties 

Sweaters 
Etc. 



For College Men 




SMART WING TIP OXFORDS $7.50 

An outstanding Style for the young 
man who wishes the new models and 
shoes that are attractive in appearance, 
and wear well. 

BLACK OR BROWN SCOTCH 
GRAIN $7.50 

Another top-notch Oxford shown is our 
WULFF "VARSITY SPECIAL" $6 
This line, also made up under our 
personal direction and designed espec- 
ially for us, gives you Black or Brown 
Calf Oxfords in several new lasts at $6. 
Drop in and see them. 



110 So. Tejon St. 




9bc Colorado CoUc^c ^^ 

tlMlBlil:] 




Official Students Publication 

VOLUME XXXII Numbers 



»t_^i 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMI 



<"^M 5P'~> «~Tna 5£r~> r""Qa 5p'~» <-"'n{j Op'"! '"TM ^r~» •'^oo o^ 
isBl-^ i.>ol5 cEL_> t.>CT5 otlj t-joFS ooL_> <_^ct5 PtL^ ' 




Colorado Springs — Center of Culture 




Editorial Office— 23 Weat Colorado Ave. 



October 4. 1929 



THE TIGER 




The Colorado Planing 
Mill Co. 

MILL WORK OF ALL 
DESCRIPTIONS 

PADDLES 
Frank Mitchell, Manager 

Phone 2876-W 
525 W. Colorado Ave. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



I 
Made in Colorado Springs | 

VAN BRIGLE | 
ART POTTERY j 

The world's most famous ? 
art pottery. | 



t Visitors always welcome. 



PLAZA 

DINING 
ROOM 



i 
I 

i 
I 

I Breakfast 



'The Place to Eat" 



Luncheon 



Dinner 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



SMART LUGGAGE 
INDESTRUCTO 

LUGGAGE SHOP 
HN.Tejon M. 250 



BUICK MOTOR CARS 



Strang's 



Harry D. MacDonald 
President 



J. Collier T. M. Collie. 

V. L. Collier 

TheCOLUER 

LUMBER CO. 

Phone Main 386 

543 W. Colorado Ave. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 



CITY COAL 

15 East Pikes Peak Avenue 

Phone 

Main 67 or 120 



PAUDRE-PAUFFE 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Permanent Finger and Watei 

Waving 

Manicure and Scalp Treatments 

Marcels 50c. 



Photographs of our Colorado 
mountains. Nicely made — 
attractively colored by hand. 
Moderate in price — framed 
or unframed. 

H. L. STANDLEY 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs 



W. I. L 



lUcas 

HAS 

EVERYTHING IN 

SPORTING GOODS 
"Tigers always welcome" 

119 N. Tejon St. 
Main 900 



I 


"FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 


» 


} 


We Dry Clean 




} Ladies' 


#--^^^ 


Gents' 


j Dresses 
1 Furs 




G)ile|e~--^.^_ 


Hats 
Topcoats 


j Gloves 




V3'^H^HBV^r^^^H^^^ 


Tuxedos 


Hats 




Tm pT« 1 iQi^^ 


Gloves 


Scarfs 




LM^^-J** 


Ties 


Etc. 


^ "Phone us first" 


Sweaters 


* 


M. 2958 


Etc. , 


It 


-'■■'——■— 




, 



Knorr's Market 

FOR YOUR PARTIES OR PICNICS 



Let us supply you with 
good things to eat 



123 North Tejon 



Phone 2802 



Dine and Dance 

a^ THE COLLEGE INN 

SPECIAL STUDENT LUNCHES 25c 



PigglyJ^iccly 



-^^ 



ALL OVER THE WORLD 

FIVE BUSY STORES IN 
COLORADO SPRINGS 



Write your friends on 

Crested 
Stationery 

Murray's have a complete line of station- 
ery with the Crest of your Fraternity or of 
the College. 

TheJVlURRAY 

Drug Co. 

Across from the Campus 



Issued Friday of each week. Entered at the Post Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter. 



VOLUME XXXII 



GIHFd TieER 



Colorado College Weekly News Maga 



Number 3 



SOCIAL SOCIETIES 
ANNOUNCE PLEDGING 



Minerva And Hypatia Pledge Nine 

Contemporary Bids Five 

And Zets Four 



The women's society pledging 
was held at three o'clock on Thurs- 
day afternoon. Open bidding rules 
governed the proceeding. There 
was exceptionally good material 
[ I this year, and all the societies 
I seemed to fair well in the bidding. 
I Contemporary pledged five; Hypa- 
[ tia, nine; Minerva, nine; and Zet- 
I aitheian four 

j Contemporary pledged Frances 
j Vollmer, Virginia Patterson, Eliza- 
beth Kennedy, Mary Bloom and 
Virginia Freudenburger. 

Hypatia pledged Virginia 
Daley, Jo Campbell, Myra Rein- 
kmg, Connie Postlethwaite, Millie 
Strachan, Katherine Herbert, Elean- 
or Watts, and Maxine Moore. 
Minerva pledged Alyce Ireland, 
. Marian Weinberger, Mary Galla- 
gher, Velma Rose, Garland Prather, 
Sonia Benderoff, Betty Lansdown, 
Fiances Willis, Martha Katherine 
Sharer. 

Zetalethians pledged Helen Hult- 
maii, Betty Swcetman, Alice Gil- 
lette, and Mary Strachan. 




LOVin IS CO-AUTHOR 
OF STATISTICS BOOK 



Professors 
X' i 1 1 i a m V. 
Lovitt, Ph. D., 
Professor o f 
VI a t h e - 
Tiatics at Colo- 
:ado College, 
ind Henry F. 
rfoltzclaw. Ph. 
!>., Professor 
LOVITT )f Commerce 

at the University of Kansas, are the 
co-authors of a new book "Statis- 
tistics." The book has developed 
over a period of years during which 
each author has tested the material 
in the classroom, and suggestions 
have been interchanged. 

In this work, the aim has been to 
provide the fundamental principles 
of the theory in as simple and non- 
technical a presentation as possible. 
Among the subjects treated, are 
Sampling, Tabulation, Averages. 
Correlation, and Index Numbers. 

1 he volume will be published 
about the first of the year. 



FRESHMEN WILL LEARN 
TO WEAR YELLOW CAPS 



A few months ago the campus of 
C. C. was literally covered with little 
yellow flowers poppuig out of the 
ground and very proudly showing 
their yellow tops. The last few days 
there has been another out-cropping 
of yellow tops, not in the least re- 
sembling flowers, but nevertheless 
yellow tops seem prevalent upon the 
campus. And, metaphorically speak- 
ing, in the same manner. — dandil- 
ions topping the blades of green 
grass and Frosh caps donning the 
heads of Freshmen. Catch on? 

The Frosh "dinkies" add a little 
touch of atmosphere to the campus 
in their quaint and rakish manner 
in which they are worn. Some cock- 
ed on the side of a head, others tilt- 
ed toward the back of a pate, and 
st:ll others worn in most every con- 
ceivable fashion. The Frosh ihave 
learned, or if they have not learned 
wall learn, that severe penalties will 
be administered if the caps are not 
worn continually on the campus or 
where ever one of the newly adopt- 
ed infants of Colorado College 
might be. Some wear them with joy 
that being a freshman is the most 
joyous time of ones life, and others 
wear them with utter disgust that 
they are to be so plainly in evidence 
as neophytes of this institution. So 
Frosh take heed and wear your 
"dinkie" constantly or the wolves 
will get you if you don't watch out. 



Dr James G. McMurtry, profes- 
sor of biblical literature and ap- 
plied religion, was the principal 
luncheon meeting of the Lions' 
Club at tl'.e Ann Louise Cafeteria on 
Tuesday. 



COLORADO COLLEGE SITUATED IN 
CULTURAL CENTER OF THE WEST 



Locality Offers Splendid Opportunities In Music, 

Art, Dramatics, And Research Work; City 

Sponsors Concert Series 



ALPHA KAPPA PSI HOLDS 
ELECTION OF OFFICERS 



By Lloyd H. Ellis 
Few colleges in the United States have the surroundings for a cul- 
tural seat of learning that ,has Colorado College. Many have said, in 
fact, that the cultural standing of the city is greater than that of the col- 
lege. If this be so, then certainly Colorado Springs is an ideal place 
for a college. 

Colorado Springs leads all the cities of Colorado in its interest in 
music, art, dramatics, and literary 
works. These so-called "finer 
things of life" bring to the students 
of Colorado College something in- 
tangible, a thing which high school 
graduates seek in addition to social 
affairs and studies. 

The people of Colorado Springs 
are deeply interested in good music. 
This interest results in giving stu- 
dents of Colorado College an op- 
portunity to learn music. Every 
year, a concert series which com- 
pares favorably with any like ser- 
ies in the West, is brought to the 
city by citizens of Colorado Springs. 
Students of the college are especial- 
ly invited to attend these concerts, 
and reduced prices are allowed 
them. This year, Paul Kockanski, 
Joseph Hofmann, Dusolina Gianni- 

( Continued on page 9) 



At the first meeting of Alpha 
Kappa Psi, the national business 
fraternity, officers were elected for 
the coming year and plans for put- 
ting out a booklet to advertise the 
Colorado College business depart- 
ment were discussed. 

The following officers were elect- 
ed by Alpha Kappa Psi: president, 
William Southard; vice-president, 
De Witt Tucker; secretary-treasur- 
er, Frank Dentan; diary correspon- 
dent, Harold Harmon; deputy 
ccLnselor, W. D. Cojjeiand. 

Plans for the booklet to be pub- 
lished by the fraternity were pre- 
sented, and it was decided that this 
phamplet should be sent to all high 
school students interested in bus- 
ness administration courses. 



Bramhall Seeks New State Constitution 



Dr. Edith C. Bramhall went to 
Puebl;) on October 2 to address the 
Wednesday Morning Club regard- 
ing a constitutional convention. On 
October 5 she will talk on the same 
subject to the Federation of Wom- 
en's Clubs at Pueblo. 

Dr. Bramhall has been interested 
m a reorganization of the state gov- 
ernment for a good many years and 
is therefore especially anxious now 
to interest the club women of the 
stale in working for a constitution- 
al convention. 

The last legislative assembly 
v;;lcd to lay a proposition in favor 
of a constitutional convention be- 



fore the people at the next general 
election. 

Illinois was the first state to re- 
organize along modern scientific 
lines. This was done in 1917 un- 
der Governor Lowden when Dr. 
Bramhall was teaching in in Illinois. 
At that time she and her -ousin, 
Prof. Fred Bramhall, now of the 
University of Colorado, were active 
in securing the support of many o f 
the clubs of Illinois lor Governor 
Lowden's undertaking. 

It is Dr. Bramhall's hope that 
some such reorganization as that ef- 
fected 111 Illinois may be brought 
about 11) Colorado. 



MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY 
ENTERTAINED DY SISAM 




Colorado Col- 
lege was host 
to the mem- 
bers of the 
American 
M a t h e - 
matical Soci- 
ety and t h e 
M a t h e - 
matical Asso- 
ciation o f 
America o n 
August 21. After inspecting the 
campus and the building of the 
College, t h e visitors were enter- 
tained for the afternoon at the 
home of Professor Sisam. About 
fifty guests were entertained. The 
mathematicians expressed them- 
selves as greatly pleased with Colo- 
rado College and with the equip- 
ment il possesses. 



SISAM 



THE TIGER 



Freshman Girls 
Hear Talks On 
C. C. Activities 



In order to acquaint freshmen girls 
with the campus organizations to 
which they may belong, Represent- 
atives from the different organiza- 
tions made short talks describing 
the purpose of the organizations 
and the rules for eligibility. 

Mary Strachan, vice-president of 
Koshare, explained that the purpose 
of that organization is to advance 
dramatic interests in the school. 
Tryouts must be given before the 
whole society although selection of 
new members is made by a com- 
mittee. A tryout consists of a learn- 
ed selection three minutes long. 
Two people trying out together may 
save four minutes. 

Euterpe, a club organized to 
further the study of music, was re- 
presented by Margaret Rhodes. 
Anyone interested in music is el- 
igible to become an associate mem- 
ber, but active membership is con- 
fined to students in the school of 
music. 

The girls glee club was repre- 
sented by Helen Huffman. Tryouts 
have been held, and selection of 
members for the semester has been 
made. Attendance at practice is 
compulsory, and girls who are ab- 
sent are dropped from the organiza- 
tion and lose their social credits. 
The glee club gives two formal con- 
certs each year and also goes on 
short tours. 

Lloyd Ellis, editor of the Tiger, 
said that anyone who wished to try- 
out for a position on the staff might 
do so by writing three personals, at- 
taching iher name and telephone 
number, and placing the assignment 
in the Tiger box in the library. 

Gail D'ien, representing the girls' 
oichestra, said that she wanted to 
get in touch with all girls interested 
in joining the orchestra. If enough 
interest is shown, a well-known loc- 
al musician will be secured to direct 
the orchestra. 

Florence Pickett, first vice-pres- 
ident of the Women's Athletic As- 
sociation, explained the purpose of 
that organization, and discussed the 
point system. This year, the Colo- 
rado college W. A. A., will act as 
hostess to the W. A. A.'s of Colo- 
rado, Wyoming and Montana at the 
annual Play Day held by the organ- 
ization. The riding club was dis- 
cussed by Velma Rose. 

Before the meeting was adjourn- 
ed, the group sang a number of col- 
lege songs. Betty Fuller led the sing- 
ing, and urged the new girls to learn 
the songs as soon as possible. 



ROTARY CLUB CHOOSES 
HARMON AND SOUTHARD 



Each year the Rotary Club of 
Colorado Springs elects two promi- 



BEAT AGGIES 




HARMON 

Harmon and William P. Southard, 
Jr. As student Rotarians they are 

allowed a 1 1 

the privileges 
which the 
regular mem- 
bers enjoy. 

Four mer- 
bers of t h e 
faculty are 
R o t a r i - 
ans. They 
are: Presi- 
dent C. C. SOUTHARD 
M 1 e r o w , 

Dean C. B. Hershey, William Cope- 
land, and James G. McMurtry. Last 
year the two student members were 
Glen Wade and Arlie Beery. 

The purpose in doing this is to 
bring the business men of the city 
in closer contact with the college 
men. The International Rotary 
selects one member only from each 
business and profession. Its object 
is the interchange of ideas that 
may prove stimulatmg to both bus- 
iness and campus Hfe. 




STUDENT OFFICERS ARE 
SELECTED AT C. W. C. 



After two weeks of political cam- 
paignmg, students at Colorado 
Woman's College have elected class 
officers for the yeaj^. 

Girls honori;d in the Sophomore 
Class are: Dorothy Mereness, Las 
Animas, president; Bernice Tunze, 
Englewood, vice-president: Ethel 
Huchingson, Denver, secretary; and 
Lorine Gross, Fort Colhns, treas- 
urer. 

New Freshman Class officers 
are: Jean French, Laramie, Wyo., 
president; Millie Cuder, Fort Mor- 
gan, vice-president; Alice Johnson, 
Salida, secretary; and Alma Lack- 
ner, Brush, Treasurer. 



Coed Raps Boy Friends; Then 

Forgives and Forgets — Moral 



BEAT AGGIES 



By Miss Reporter 

Say, last Friday while I was slay- 
ing some intervals, I happened t o 
pick up this baloney dispenser, and 
what did I see but the opinion of 
some prancing egg on this season's 
crop of femmes. Now I happened 
to be one of those "spare ribs" my- 
self, and it didn't take long for me 
to decide not to take those hoarse 
croakings from the dainty lady kill- 
ers. So I just popped right up to 
the defence of us social delights 
rnd I'm going to tell you our side 
of it. 

In the first place most of these 
dashing heros around here are 
swelled up like boils, but now and 
then one notices you just like you 
would somthing that kitty found 
dead under the back porch, the first 



LARGE NUMBER TURN OUT 
FOR THE BAND PRACTICE 



At a meeting held in Perkins' hall 
last Tuesday night at 7:30, the 
prospects for a good, snappy, band 
became bright when the largest 
number of players to turn out for 
many years responded to a call for 
organization. 

At this meeting there were about 
25 college musicians present, and 
reports indicated that several more 
were unable to be present, and ex- 
pected to turn out later. The organ- 
ization of the band, and the time 
and place of rehearsals were dis- 
cussed. Until further notice prac- 
ticing will be done at 7:00 p. m. in 
Cossitt. Carl Burke was elected 
band manager, and Paul Conover 
secretary-treasurer. 

It is felt that the failure of the 
band in past years has been the 
Irck of administrative support, and 
the absence of any inducement to 
play. With this in mind, attempts 
are beuig made this year to place 
the band on a firm basis as a school 
organization, and to gain for its 
members some reward such as gym 
excuses, activity tickets, or pre- 
ferably, an hour's academic credit 
a semester. 



Enrollment this fall at Colorado 
Woman's College is the largest in its 
history, according to figures issued 
recently by the registrar's office. 
Records show that thirty-five per 
cent more girls .have enrolled than 
in any previous year, representing 
more than twenty states. 



time I tangled with one of the; 
salesgirl slayers was at the All-Co 
lege struggle. One of them com( 
up to me and asks if I'd like 1 
train with him for a round. Th 
big moment was good to look upc 
and could dance divinely, so whe 
he asked me if we should lay i 
some groceries at Murray's I coi 
tentedly acquiesced. But after V 
poured in the malts like an Arabia 
refugee he found that he'd left h 
money in his other suit, so I had t 
pass out the cash for the bill. The 
when we started for the halls h i 
hack was out of petroleum, and e 
I was broke, we had to walk. W 
just escaped being late and m 
shoes were worn thru so I concluc 
ed the session on him. 

Well the next pennant winner 
picked I met thru one of my frienc 
3f the convent. I looked him up i 
Bradstreet and saw that that pai 
was alright before I got organizec 
He came in a big car and ha 
p'enty of money but boy, what 
return he expected on his invesi 
m.ent. That guy could have necke 
an oyster. One hour with him wa 
like a day's work with Strangle) 
Lewis. After I got back that nigli 
I wore out one of those health be) 
machines trying to remove just 
few of the creases that were lei 
from just a preliminary bout. 

I kinda let the masculains sli] 
then for a copula days due to th 
bruising I had received at the hand 
of that last gorilla. Then one afl 
Prudence, one of my henchmen 
roped me in an on another swee 
mystery of life. This guy was , 
type. If he could have carried : 
tray he would have been a typica 
dumb waiter. He yes-ed me b 
death and was so agreeable he wa 
hard to get along with. Therefor 
I broke down and quit him. 

Then came E'lie. He was si 
cute. He had Irish terrier hair an< 
an upper lip like a soap wrapper- 
it covered a lot of Ivory. Whei 
he took you to a fraternity dance 
all you saw of it was what was ii 
next morning's paper because h( 
kept you outside in the car a 1 1 eve 
ning. He's of the genus that tak( 
babies' Castoria, and push litth 
ducks in the water. Why that guy — 

There's his horn now but I'm ofl 
that egg for life. — 

He's still tooting. Wonder if I 
better see who he wants. 

Hello Ellie. — Nothing. — Sure 
I'd love to go. — 0. K. 

You know how it is girls. 1 
couldn't have broken with him like 
that. And after all that's the last 
dance this month. 



THE TIGER 



TOWN GIRLS PLAN DANCE 
SATURDAY OF THIS WEEK 



The Town Girls' Association is 
giving a tea dance on Saturday, 
Oct. 5, from three to five o'clock, 
at the Minerva House. All new 
town girls are cordially invited as 
well cs any girl who lives in town. 
All old members should see Gerry 
Williams as scon as possible and 
pay their due of fifty cents for the 
year. 

Marjorie Ferguson, president of 
the Town Girls is managing the af- 
fair, and the following committees 
are working on the plans for Satur- 
day: 

Entertainment : Maxine Moore 
and Genevieve Engle. 

Refreshment: Florence Pickett, 
Imogene Miller, Helen Knowles, 
Mary Frances Vollmer, Margaret 
Gillen and Jo Hildrech. 

Clean-up Committee: Carolyn 
Bayliss, Charlotte Pipkin, Bertha 
Garrett, Eileen Edmundson and Vir- 
ginia Freudenberger. 

Receiving line: Randalin Trip- 
pel, Marjorie Ferguson, Sonia Ben- 
deroff, Florence Pickett, Jerry 
Williams, Maxine Moore and Ma- 
tilda Willis. 



FROSH GAME 

Saturday, October 5, at 2:30 will 
come the first opportunity to see 
the Baby Bengals in action when 
they play Ft. Logan on Washburn 
Field. Coaches Roessner and Van- 
denberg have been working .hard to 
get their men in shape to meet their 
first opponents. 

The backfield probably will con- 
sist of Owens, who has been doing 
particularly good work, Butterfield, 
Schmurr, Schweninger, and Alli- 



ORDER 

"SALLY ANN" 

CAKES AND CANDIES 

223 E. Yampa Main 1547-W 



Fat Faculty Men 
Shine At Picnic 



One hundred members of the 
Colorado College faculty attended 
their annual picnic, held September 
28, at Camp Colorado. 

So greatly did Miss Roberts ex- 
cel in preparing the food that after 
the meal, some wondered if they 
could play baseball and if they be- 
longed on the fat or lean side. 
Nevertheless, they played, and Mr. 
Parker proved a veritable "Casey 
at the bat." The fat men won and 
since they did, what argument have 
those in favor of training? 

The women, desiring a more 
adylike pastime, played at horse- 
shoes. Miss Tate displayed unusual 
brawn and muscle. 

Childish sports are often trifling 
and not enjoyable to all, so the in- 
tellectual game of bridge took a 
prominent part in the afternoon's 
entertainment. Mr. Arthur Sharp 
won first. 



son, all of whom have shown up 
well in preliminary practice. 

In the line, there are three men 
who will do much to support t ih e 
backfield, Rorack, Stillman, and 
Beatty. 

This being the first opportunity 
to see a football game at Colorado 
Springs and also the first chance to 
judge our next year's varsity ma- 
terial, a good turn-out is expected. 



EAT 'EM UP TIGERS 

Then come down and eat 
that tasty 
Confection 

AL'S FRENCH 
FRIED POPCORN 

114 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 



FROSH MEN 

There will be a meeting of 
all freshmen men at Cossitt 
Hall, one o'clock Friday, Oc- 
tober 1 1 . Every freshman 
must be present. The upper- 
classmen inform us that an 
accurate check will be taken, 
and ample paddling done the 
absentees. 

Boxes, barrels, logs, and 
stumps are necessary for the 
big bonfire the night before 
the Aggie game. A pile of 
wood forty feet high is going 
to .help "Beat Aggies!" 



TIGER MEETING 
Over forty candidates for the 
Tiger staff of this year met in Tick- 
nor Study last Friday night for di- 
rections and first assignments. The 
new form of the paper was dis- 
cussed, and suggestions called for. 
The regular staff will not be picked 
until all have had articles to write. 
The staff will be smaller this year 
than it has been previously, since a 
smaller group will be in closer con- 
tact with the paper. After a few 
minor details were discussed, t h e 
meeting was dismissed. 



COLLEGESTORE IN COSSITT 
IS MANAGED BY HAYDEN 

The College Store, a branch of 
the Colorado Springs Sporting 
Goods Com- 
pany is now 
open for bus- 
iness a t its 
old location 
in Cossitt 
Hall. This is 
t h e second 
c o n s e c u- 
tive year of 
its operation. 

To its sup- 
ply of sportin 
been added a 




HAYDEN 



goods, there has 
complete line of 
school equipment, including a trad- 
ing market for used text books. 
And, of course, there is always a 
fresh supply of candy and cigar- 
ettes. 

This store is run entirely by col- 
lege students. "Fat" Hayden, man- 
ager and football star, has done a 
great deal to secure a complete 
stock for the convenience of college 
trade. It is open to both men and 
women, and the sales thus far show 
that it is receiving its due support. 
In brief, it is a college institution 
for college trade. 



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THE TIGER 



EDITORIAL 




THE TIGER 
Member of Rocky Mountain Inter-Collegiate Press Association 

The Colorado College Newspaper, Published Weekly by the Students. 



LLOYD H. ELLIS, Main 1975 Editor 

JAMES PATTERSON, Main 2575 Manager 



THIS WEEK'S STAFF. 

The following students contributed to this week's Tiger: Ivan 
Schweninger, Byron Whaley, Carl Burke, Velma Rose, Mark Perkinson, 
Melba Adams, Hermina Kahn, Effie Gilbert, Art Baylis, Marjorie Gilbert, 
Wayne Campbell T. E. Nowels, Randalin Trippel, Hartley Murray, Mari- 
anna Sackett, Jo Campbell, Elizabeth Kennedy, T. C. Tate, Genevieve 
Engel, Betty Lansdown, Wilmoth Harris, Henry Smith, Fred Nichols, 
Marjorie Ferguson, and Margaret Gillen. 



MANUSCRIPTS 



BEAT AGGIES. 

Once more, the cry "Beat Aggies" resounds about the Colorado Col- 
lege campus. This slogan brings back old memories of past battles 
when Colorado Aggies and Colorado College, old traditional gridiron 
rivals, met to decide who was the better. Sophomores, Juniors, and 
Seniors well remember what fights these games have been in former 
years. Pep is more rampant on this occasion than for any other game 
on the schedule. 

Last year was no exception to this rule. A telephone call to a 
fraternity house always was answered by "Beat Aggies." Stencils were 
brought from their files; and on sidewalks, windows, and every position 
of advantage, there was the legend: "Beat Aggies." During no other 
game in our schedule was enthusiasm so stirred up as was that last 
game of the season. 

This year, it is hoped by the enthusiasm committee that the stu- 
dents of Colorado College will start out with as much enthusiasm as 
they had when they ended the season last year. There is no doubt that 
Aggies are pointing for the Colorado College game. Coach Hughes and 
Coach Van de Graaff are out to win the game, and it will be a battle 
between the two wiliest coaches in the Rocky Mountain Conference. 
Due to injuries, the Colorado College line-up will not be as formidable 
as it could be. What the team lacks in power, the student body must 
make up in enthusiasm. Then, Colorado College will "Beat Aggies." 



SUPPORT THE BAND. 

For the past four or five years, Colorado College has had no re- 
spectable band. Usually, the music has been left to the Colorado Springs 
High School Band. While this band is a good one, it is not the Colorado 
College Band. 

It is the spirit of the band which needs bolstering up. For too 
many years, it has been slighted. In most colleges, it is an honor to 
play in the band; at Colorado College, there is too much selfish interest 
in the students. Beginning with this year, the band ought to receive 
the whole-hearted support of the student body. Anyone who talks un- 
favorably of the organization ought to be given the chance to blow bub- 
bles in Monument Lake. Fraternities should consider the band when 
they demand that a pledge go out for some activity. 

At Perkins Hall on Tuesday evening, a group of enthusiastic men 
got together and organized a band for the coming year. They are going 
to practice every evening in Cossitt Hall. Carl Burke has been chosen 
band manager, and he is getting the band started in the right way. 
What the band men need now is a little encouragement. When you 
meet a member of the band in the corridors, ask him how he is getting 
along. Boost the Colorado College Band, and we'll beat Aggies on the 
football field and in the grandstands. 



Of particular interest to college 
students is the fact that Manuscripts 
appeared on sale at the local book- 
stores this week. It is edited and 
published by Willis E. Kinnear in 
Indianapolis, Indiana. It is some- 
thing entirely new in the field of 
magazine publications. The format 
is unique and the purpose is very 
unusual. The magazine caters to 
the younger writers throughout the 
United States, primarily to those 
who are attending the universities. 
It is being published in the interest 
of the college writers and their pro- 
fessors. Manuscripts is being dis- 
tributed on a national scale and has 
the support of many prominent lit- 
erary men. Robert Morss Lovett, 
Norman Foerster and Edith R. Mir- 
rielees are advistory editors 



THURSDAY CHAPEL SERVICE! 



Mr. Roberts wishes to announci 
that he will give a series of talks a 
the Thursday morning Chapel Servi 
ces to include the following: 

1. What about God? 

2. Was Jesus Divine? 

3. Does Prayer Work? 

4. Is the Church Necessary? 

5. What is Salvation? 

6. What has become of Hell? 

7. Is Life Immortal ? 

8. Will there be a Judgemen 

Day? 

9. Is the Bible true? 

10. Was there a Garden oj 
Eden? 

There will also be a box for anj 
questions the students may care to 
ask about religion. The Box will be 
in the rear of the Chapel. You neec 
not sign your name to any question, 



TWO POEMS BY MARGARET BISSONNETTE 

CRITICAL NOTE: The two poems by Margaret Bissonnettee are 
unusual in their scope. The poem "ALAS" soliloquizes in a definite 
minor mood. The tonal quality of the colors alligorically suggests the 
brightest hopes of falling around the 'blueness' of despondency brought 
on by a capricious whim, which ultimately vanishes into its native noth- 
ingness. The setting is distinctly Oriental, while depicting the r.esthe- 
ticism of early Greeks. 

Hokku is a typical form of Japanese litert Lure, and while these 
lines are original, yet Miss Bissonnette admirably maintains the native 
aspect of this type of Oriental literature. The orientation and mysticism 
of the Japanese philosophy is more suitably suggested by phrases that 
merely state a cue for the mind to wander into the realm of the pro- 
found. This is characteristic of only the Oriental, and this charactic 
is commendably portrayed in the three selections under the title "HOK- 
KU." The romanticism in the power of suggestion is clearly felt in the 
reading of these bits of Orientalism. — ^John W. Hausserman, Jr. 

ALAS 

Gold and scarlet leaves 

Fall on the windy plain. 

And the blue lotus 

Withers in the Autumn sky. 

There is no joy for me 

In the lowing of twilight herds. 

Or with the spearmen 

In their black tents — 

For I think I have a madness on me 

That will put me out of the dust. 

And out of the sun forever. 



HOKKU 



He loved her not, he said. 

Like autumn rain 

His tears, when she was dead. 

II 
Mist clings upon the hills 
Half-revealed. 
Life — and death? 

Ill 
The morning-glorys' hour 
Is dead at noon. 
She, a more fragile flower . . 



THE TIGER 



HOLLY SUGAR 

is 
the Best 

Sugar the essential food. 

HOLLY SUGAR 
CORPORATION 



Quality 

Cleaners and Dyers 

SUITS, O'COATS 

HATS $1.25 

U-Fone 1-8-1-1 We'll Call 

H. A. Thompson 
10 E. Kiowa 



DUTCH 

for touchdowns and DUTCH 
(Hammond) for new driver- 
less cars. 

New Fords 7c per mile; 
30c per hour. 

New Cheve Six's 6 to 8c per 
mile; 35c per hour. j 

Office i 

ELK HOTEL j 

Phones M. 346 and 2065 j 
Free Delivery ? 



WHY NOT 

Learn Typewriting 
while attending Col- 
lege? Your teachers 
will appreciate type- 
written work to be 
checked. We can ar- 
range hours to suit 
your convenience. 



^i 









SOCIETY 



Kappa Sigma Pledge Dance 

Honoring Ralph Dial, Byron 
Whaley, Edwin Engstrom, Clifford 
Vessey, Marvin Engbretson, Vaiden 
Hunt, Clinton Cheek, Joe Brady, 
Louis Yard, Fred Schmidt, Ralph 
Jones, Maurice Griffith, Richard 
Hale, Jack Kintz, Robert Tracey, 
Jack Fisher, Arthur Morrell, Everet 
Rex, Gordon Carson, Stanley Ge- 
shell, Morley Brandborg, James 
Waddell, Jack Kurrie, and Clay 
Pomeroy, the Kappa Sigma frater- 
nity gave their annual pledge dance 
on Saturday evening, Sept. 28. 

Other guests included: Mrs. Tex 
Muncy, Mrs. Paul Coram, Misses 
Doris Butler, Ruth Gordon, Ran- 
dalin Trippel, Jean Horan, Mary Jo 
Chamberlin, Alice Aaby, Rebecca 
Todd,, Margaret Killian, Grace Per- 
kins, Eleanor Watts, Dorothy Mc- 
Crary, Phyllis Ormsby, Virginia 
Easton, Alberta Jones, Olive Brad- 
ley, Marian McMillan, Mary Mc- 
Connell, Betty Lansdown, Con- 
stance Postlethwaite, Betty Fuller, 
Sally Sheldon, Frances Raywood, 
Genevieve Curry, Virginia Patter- 
son, Glen Streams, Virginia Dewey, 
Dorothy Faus, Margery Southmayd, 
Velma O'Manion, Elizabeth Skid- 
more, Sally Tompkins, Margaret 
Tyson, Matilda Willis, Marie Ben- 
ning, Pat Johnston, Marian Coles, 
Evelyn Jones, Priscilla Todd, Alber- 
ta Nelson, Dorothy Horn, Mary Jo 
Lawley, Helen Hummel, Marjorie 
Gilbert, Sally Oliver, Catherine 
Sweet, Lorena Duan, Margaret Kir- 
by, Dorothy Chamberlin. The chap- 
erons were Dr. and Mrs. J. G. Mc- 
Murtry and Mr. and Mrs. C. W. 
Kurrie, Jr. 

.Mthough there have been only 
two week-ends sinci school start- 
ed, a number of guests have been 
entertained at Bemis and McGregor 
Halls. 



On Sept. 19, Mrs. Wright of 
Grand Junction was the guest of iher 
daughter, Delina. She occupied one 
of the Bemis guests rooms during 
her stay. 



Miss Jean Tibbs of Milwaukee 
was the guest of her sister, Marian, 
at McGregor on Sept. 21. 



Mrs. R. C. Raywood from Gold- 
en visited her daughter, Virginia, at 
McGregor, Sept. 24. 

Two women from Saguache, 
Colo., Miss Eleanor Slane and Miss 
Carol Sherman, were entertained at 
McGregor on Sept. 27 and 28. 
They are the sisters of Irene Slane 
and Louise Sherman. 



'''icknor has had no guests so far 
this year. 



Sigma Chi Mother's Meetbg 

Sigma, the organization compos- 
ed of the wives and mothers of the 
members of the Sigma Chi fratern- 
ity, met on Thursday afternoon at 
the chapter house. The hostesses 
vvere Mrs. Robert M. Reid, and 
Mis. C. N. Weaver. 



Beta Dance 

The Beta Theta Pi national frat- 
ernity held their annual pledge 
dance on Friday evening, Sept. 27. 
The new pledges include Hulbert 
Cruzan, Tom Pulliam, Dave Moffat, 
Jim McCluskey, Bill Beatty, Rudoph 
Anderson, Ralph Smith, Sam Lar- 
son, Bill Walters, John Hall, Everett 
more, Virginia Dewey, Mary Evelyn 
Stapleton, Art Kelly, and Ed Gray. 

Other guests were Betty Skid- 
Aldendifer, Lucile Conroy, Beth 
Smith, Jo Campbell, Genevieve 
Engel. Frances Thatcher, Martha 
Herbert, Virginia Easton, Ruth 
Frame, Mildred Straohan, Margaret 
Killian, Alyce Ireland, Sarah Mason, 
Katherine Herbert, Frances Willis, 
Sally Sheldon, Mary Gallagher, H. 
Floyd, L. Johnston, Priscilla Todd, 
Dorothy Horn, Katherine Poland, 
Marian Coles, Margaret Bradfield, 
Phyllis Ormsby, Rebecca Todd, Bet- 
ty Lansdown, Jane Lowell, Lois 
Coleman, Allene Anderson, Eva 
Crowder, Violet Bevan, Mrs. J. For- 
rest Phelps, Katherine Askin, and 
Adda Smith. The chaperons were 
Dean and Mrs. Wm. V. Lovitt and 
Dean L. W. Fauteaux. 



ORGAN RECITALS 



Ail C. C. students are cordially 
invited to attend the Grace Church 
organ recitals given there every 
Tuesday and Thursday evenings be- 
ginning at five-thirty. Mr. Freder- 
ick Boothroyd, organist of the 
church, presents a novel and varied 
program consisting of the modern 
compositions as wel las the classics. 

Beginning Thursday the 26th 
rnd on the following Thursday, Mr. 
Boothrowd will play the organ 
works of Bach in chronological or- 
der. 

These recitals, which have been 
financed by Mrs. F. M. P. Taylor 
in memory of her husband who was 
a great lover of music, offer a 
really rare opportunity m the way 
of musical entertainment and ap- 
preciation. The organ, one of the 
loveliest in this part of the country, 
is in itself an inspiration. 

C. C. students should not fail to 
avail themselves of this valuable in- 
vitation of the Grace Church to be- 
come better acquainted with t h e 
works of the greatest composers. 



"Better Equipped Than Ever 
To Handle College Trade." 



CAMPBELL'S 

BARBER SHOP 



109 East Pikes Peak Avenue ! 



%OMiimi 



TENT £.' AWNING CO 



Awnings and Camp Supplies 



The Trip that Bankrupts the 
English Lcinguage 

CORLEY 

Mt. Highway 

Cripple Creek in high gear 



Say it with flowers 




30 N. lejon Phone M. 214 




A 

Colombii 
Rccordinii 
Orchestra 



"SEVEN 
ACES" 

AH E,leven o£ Them 



Opening 
October 11 and 12 

HOTEL 

COSMOPOLITA1 




THE TIGER 



SEE 

Leon Starbuck 

College Agent for 

PEARt tAUMDRT 



BUILDING supplies of course include at the same time every- 
thing used in repairs, improvements, etc., with Mill Work 
of the highest class workmanship. 

CRISSEY-FOWLER 

LUMBER COMPANY 



117 W. Vermijo 



Main 101 



Pho.Tie Main 4671 831 North Tejon 

A. L. STARK 

TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 

COLORADO SPRINGS 



TJ7t4iking1 AMERICA 




BROTHER AGAINST BROTHER 
But different — a brilliant, new, startlingly 
original, remarkably appealing, romantic com- 
edy drama of modem youngsters. 
HEAR AND SEE THE ARMY-NAVY FOOT- 
BALL CLASSIC! 



SPORTS 



FOOTBALL 

By Chauncey H. Blodgett, Jr. 
The Three R's of schoolday fame 
are well known to all, but the var- 
sity sprang a new one this week 
when they walked over the frosh in 
a 32-0 victory. The upperclassmen 
had too much of the Three A's — 
agility, acceleration and avoirdu- 
pois — and also 'axperience', which 
combination proved too much for 
the yearlings. 

The Flying Dutchman scampered 
75 yards for one touchdown from a 
kickoff, fifty yards more for an- 
other, and crossed the frosh line 
again toward the last heat of the 
game. 

With the Aggie game, the season 
opener for the Black and Gold, not 
far away, the Tigermen are devel- 
oping fast. Plays are run thru 
with no thought of hesitation, the 
blocking and tackling are done with 
finality that permits no argument, 
and the interference is good. 

The backfield, with five or six 
candidates showing up well, has 
the needed material for a shifty and 
fast combination as well as the beef 
necessary for the line plays. 

Jones, plunging ball toter, is go- 
ing to make good this year, from 
all indications, and has the habit of 
plugging thru the wall until dragged 
down for good. Irwin is a good 
example for him to follow, and is a 
ball toter that will give the confer- 
ence teams something to think 
about. Pomeroy and Akin have 
plenty of speed, and are in their 
element in a broken field. 

The line seems capable of stand- 
ing up under quite a bit, altho the 
farmers will bring down a different 
proposition than that which the 
yearling team had to offer this 
week. They opened holes with a 
regularity that was fatal to the first 
ye: r men, and show promise of con- 
tinuing for some time to come. 

The frosh, hopefuls of the Tiger 
teams of coming yerrs, have some 
mean possibilities. Roarck, lines- 
man, was to be seen time and again 
in behind the varsity line, smearing 
their plays and throwing their ball- 
toter for a loss. Owens, formerly a 
big shot in Utah prep school foot- 
ball, showed a clean pair of heels to 
the upperclassmen several times, 
covering yards with ability on end 
runs. The youngsters put out a 
real exhibition of blocking, and 
some good hard tackling. 

Regardless of the score — and 
scores are mighty poor indications 
of ability — the frosh are bright j 
and shining hopes for next yee.r. I 



INTERFRATERNITY ATHLETICS 



Since the inter-mural athleti< 
curriculum does not embrace anj 
of the fall and minor sports, tenta 
tive plans are under way to drav 
up a schedule which will include 
them and which will award cups or 
a new basis. 

As discussed by the inter-frater 
nity council, the plan is one whicl 
will include hitherto untried frater 
nity sports such as, golf, tennis 
touchball, horseshoes, and swim 
ming. In as much as it is felt tha 
none of these sports are importan 
enough to merit a cup individually 
the plan will be to play about threi 
of the above list, and to award thi 
cup to the organization having thi 
most points at the end of the tour 
nament. The inter-fraternity coun 
cil will work out the point system. 

Since the winter and sprini 
games, basketball, baseball, a n < 
track, are major sports, they wil 
not be awarded on the collectivi 
point basis, but a cup or pennan 
will be given for each sport. 

Indications ere that the fraterni 
ties are in favor of trying the nev 
idea. 

W. A. A. PLAY 



W. A. A. will have a big yea 
ahead of it, climaxed by play da; 
next sprmg, according to Mis 
Sonia Benderoff, president. 

The Women's Athletic Associa 
tion is a state wide organizatioi 
with the purpose of encouragini 
girls to participate in athletics. A 
Colorado College a girl becomes : 
member of W. A. A. by takin: 
v.'ork in the physical education de 
partment, but to hold office s h 
must have earned 100 points ii 
athletics. For participation in ath 
letics W. A. A. awards various hon 
ors, the highest of which is the C 
C. sweater. 

Each year the W. A. A.'s o 
Colorado and Wyoming have a pla; 
day at one of the schools. Thi 
year it will be held at C. C. Mis 
Benderoff says that competitive 
games and stunts have been tenta 
tively planned, but definite plan 
will be made at a meeting of thi 
W. A. A. board. 



DEMPSEY 

William Harrison Dempsey, thi 
promoter, formerly Jack Dempsey 
will present his first boxing shov 
as an impressario in his own right 
tcmorrov/ night at the Chicagc 
cohseum. 

Indicc tions are that the coliseun 
remodeled end its seating capacity 
i.xreased to accommodations foi 
10,000 persons, will be filled foi 
Dempsey's premier. 



THE TIGER 



EVENTS 



KOSHARE 

Prof. Arthur Sharp announces 
that try-outs for the forthcoming 
Koshare Club production will be 
held in Cogswell theatre next Thurs- 
day evening, at seven-thirty o'clock. 

Try-outs this year will not be lim- 
ited to members of the organiza- 
tion. Any regular member of the 
student body is eligible. Prof. 
Sharp will be in charge of the work. 

At a meeting of the organization 
this week Robert Doyle was elected 
secretary, to take the place of Wil- 
liam Crago, who is now attending 
the University of Michigan. 

Students in psychology at a Col- 
orado College have found that each 
kiss cuts off a year of life. 
But what would ten centuries of 
life amount to without kisses! 



Have You 

HEARD— 

About the Line-up on 
the New Clothes for 
Fall. 

FIRST STRING COLORS — 
burgundy, plum, wine, gun- 
mental. Tiger blue, CC ox- 
ford. 

FIRST DOWN WEAVES — 
diagonal, sharkskin, pineap- 
ple. Pall Mall, herringbone, 
honeycomb. 

GRIDIRON FABRICS — Re- 
sistotwist. Tiffany worsted, 
Dwight-isle tweed. Super 
cheviot. 

If you want to know more 
about clothes that play t h e 
part, go into a huddle at 
"The Boys." 

"Trade With The Boys" 
Pikes Peak at Nevada 



CULTURAL CENTER 

iOnnMn-aeA from page 3) 

ni, Richard Crooks, and the Minne- 
apolis Symphony orchestra are on 
the civic concert series. Then too, 
every Tuesday and Thursday at 
5:30, organ recitals are given at 
the Grace Church. 

The college and the city have 
made Colorado Springs the art cen- 
ter of the West. Artists form col- 
onies around Colorado Springs, 
painting, and showing to many for 
the first time, the beauties of our 
western country. The Broadmoor 
Art Academy, affiliated with t h e 
college, has several internationally 
known painters who teach classes, 
paint, and give daily criticisms. 
These painters have their pictures 
permanently hung in the Metropol- 
itan Museum, New York; in Eng- 
land, France and Italy; and in 
many well known collections in the 
United States. The Carnegie Art 
Collection offers the students of 
Colorado College a collection of in- 
estimable value. 

Colorado Sprmgs offers several 
large libraries to students. The city 
library and the college library are 
well equipped to serve the purpose 
of advanced students. In the read- 
ing room of the Coburn Library are 
received over 300 of the leading 
literary, scientific, and technical 
periodicals of this country and 
Great Britain, and also a few of 
the leading periodicals of France, 
Spain, Germany, and Italy. Many 
valuable manuscripts are owned by 
the libraries, and several private li- 
braries of Colorado Springs have 
many volumes of original prints. 

The City Auditorium and the 
Little Theatre are well filled by 
Colorado Springs' audiences when 
dramatic productions come to the 
city. These large attendances 
brnig renown actors to the city. Last 
year, the Shakespeare Stratford-on 
Avon players were included in the 
winter program. As usual, Colorado 
College students were reserved a 
special block of tickets and were 
cordially invited to attend the pro- 
ductions. 

Students are given the opportuni- 
ty of seeing pottery made in both 
the old and modern methods in the 
Van Briggle Tile and Pottery Co- 
mpany. From the old method of 
turning the wheel by hand to that 
of quanity production, students of 
Colorado College may see. 

Although Colorado College is a 
iion-seclanan school, the students 
of the college are interested in re- 
ligion. 

Certainly, Colorado College is 
fortunate in having such a cultural 
surrounding as Colorado Springs. 




Several flavors in the 
cream centers beneath 
the rich chocolate coat- 
ings. A splendid feat- 
ure for Saturday, the 
5th. 



Dern's 



GARAGE TIRE SERVICE 

CORDUROY CORDS 

Sidewall Protection 



PLAZA HOTEL BEAUTY SHOP 

Finger wave — Marcels 

Permanent Waves 

Phone Main 2515 



Frank Geddy Says— 

We are going 

to 

BEAT AGGIES 

and How! ! 

The Shoe Shop 

Across from the High School 



! Across 



Phone Main 1710 

IDEAL 

1 CLEANERS 

5 West Colorado Ave. 
Valctor Pressing Service 



This week's Candy Special 
Chocolates \\)C iD. 

BartherS 

Tejon Street at 
Acacia Park Corner 



10 



THE TIGER 




^ 



r^SAUNDERS 



Drive It Yourself 





Fords — Desotos — Chrysle 

D. C. HUTCHINGS, Mgr. 

Phone Main 1800 

21 No. Cascade 



H 



OWARD'S 

BARBER 
SHOP 



19 East Bijou Street 



CADILLAC 

and 

CHRYSLER 

MOTORCARS 

Adams Motor Co. 

Marksheffel Building 




S ervices f o r your j 
car that includes! 

Proper Lubrication 

100% Alemite 

LEADING MOTOR OILS 
Weaverized Washing 

Tire Repairing Road Service 

Drive in Today 



FIRESTONE TIRES 
117 N. Nevada Phone M. 202 



The Secretary's Office should be 
notified in all cases of change of 
cddress of students. The Directory 
will be off the press by the middle 
of October, and naturally, it should 
be as accurate as possible. 
BEAT AGGIES 

Winfred Haigler is working for 
his father, and playing with the Sil- 
ver Syncopators. He will be back 
in school next semester. 

BEAT AGGIES 

This evening seems to be the 
popular time for festivities. The 
Sigma Chi's, Phi Delts, and Fijis 
each have a pledge dance sched- 
uled. 

BEAT AGGIES 

Miss Louise Sherman and Miss 
Irene Slaine, freshmen from Sa- 
guache, Colorado, entertained their 
sisters, Caroline and Elanor Slaine 
at McGregor Hall, September 27, 
28, 29. 

Miss Mildred Kruse, Kiowa, Colo- 
BEAT AGGIES 
rado, and Miss Melba Adams, Pu- 
eblo, Colorado, went home for the 
week-end of September 27, 28, 29. 

BEAT AGGIES 

"The Missouri river is so dirty," 
according to Professor Keyte's lec- 
tuie to his freshman geology class, 
"that when the wind blows, the air 
is filled with dust." And then he 
told them one about a fog — i t 
c.me so suddenly, while he was 
driving along the highway in Ar- 
kansas, that before he could apply 
his brakes, six automobiles were in 
the ditch. 

BEAT AGGIES 

'otes 




^: 



Hugh Baker, one of last year's 
freshman footballers, will not re- 
turn to school until t h e second 
semester. 

BEAT AGGIES 

William Crago, a student last 
tending the University of Michigan, 
at Ann Arbor, Mich. 

BEAT AGGIES 

Frederick Smith, Colorado Col- 
lege '29, has accepted a position 
with a Denver advertising firm. 

Lucille Conroy, '31, is working 
for Cady L. Daniels, Inc., Chevrolet 
dealers. 



SEVENTEEN MEMBERS 
ADDED TO C. C. FACULTY 



The following are the new mem- 
bers of Colorado College's offical 

family: 

Miss Margaret Courtright, A. B. 
(University of California) '28; 
Assistant in Physical Education 
for Women. 

Mrs. Pauline Drucker, A. B. (Col- 
orado College) '29; Instructor 
in Romance Languages. 

Mrs. Louise W. Fauteaux, A. B. 
(Colorado College) '04; A. B. 
(Boston University) '26; Dean 
of Women. 

Mr. Oscar Herigstad, of the Colo- 
rado Agricultural College; In- 
structor in Physical Education 
and Assistant Coach. 

Miss Alida Israel, B. A. '(Mills Col- 
lege) '26; Part time Instructor 
in Chemistry. 

Mr. Jack F. Lawson, City Editor of 
the Colorado Springs Gazette; 
Instructor in Journalism. 

Miss Shu Ting Liu, B. S. (Univer- 
sity of Michigan) '26; M. S. 
(ibid) '28; Ph. D. (ibid) "29; 
Part time Instructor in Mathe- 
matics. 

Mrs. Ruth Montgomery, Graduate 
of the Peter Ben Brigham Hos- 
pital; Visiting Nurse. 

Mr. Fred Pickhe.rd, A. B. (Univer- 
sity of Alabama) '28; Assistant 
football coach. 

Miss Louise Purves, A. B. (Rad- 
cliffe) '02; Director of Dormi- 
tories. 

Mr. George J. Ranson, A. B. (Col- 
lege of Emporia) '21; A. M. 
(University of Kansas) '29; In- 
structor in English. 

Miss Dorothy Roberts, B. S. (Iowa 
State College) '29; Manager of 
Bemis and Cossitt Halls. 

Rev. Paul Roberts, B. A. (Trinity) 
•09; M. A. (ibid) '12; Rector 
of Grace Church and St. Steph- 
en's, will conduct chapel serv- 
ices on Thursday of each week. 

Mr. Arthur G. Sharp, Jr., A. B. 
(Colorado College) '26; A. B. 
(Princton) '28; Instructor in 
English. 

Miss Florence Leverton Smith, A. 
B. (Colorado College) '29; In- 
structor in Classics. 

Mrs. Anne B. Sutton, A. B. (Colo- 
rado College) '27; Instructor 
in French and German. 

I'vliss Maria Jeanette Clemans, A. 
B. (Colorado College) '19; 
Part time Assistant in Physical 
Education for Women. 



"Lefty" Herstrom wrs a visitor 
at the Sig Chi liouse last Sunday. 
He got. there in time to have the 
boys take him to Cossill for brcak- 
fe.st. 



Perhaps you freshmen 
don't know ,how refreshing 
Mowry's Ice Cream really is. 

Well just follow the Soph's 
and learn for yourselves what 
a delicious treat is in store 
for you. 

Have it some way every 
day. 



Mow^i?r5 



Broken Lenses Duplicated 

Save the Pieces 

Eyes examined Lenses Grounc 




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Jewelers, Optometrists and 

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Fine Watch, Clock and Jewelry 

Repairing 
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When you consider that you 
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cis smeJl as $5.00 it is not a 
question of affording it. 

The essential question is if 
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Main 95 



CHOCOLATES 

Good as Made 

Box Goods a Specialty 

WALLACE CANDY COMPANY 



Get your hair cut 
at the 

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Your patronage will be 
appreciated. 



THE TIGER 




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See It at Your College Bookstore or Write fo, - 

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COSSITT 
DINING HALL 



Back your College 

in every good thing 

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THE TIGER 




Old Gold tobaccos are naturally good 

..they do not require "artificial treatment" 



When meat or fish or fowl has to be made good 
by artificial flavoring or sauces, let your stom- 
ach beware! Beware, also, of tobaccos that 
have to rely on "artificial treatment.'* 

OLD GOLD tobaccos are naturally good; made 
honey-smooth and free of "throat scratch" 
by Mother Nature herself. By the "violet 



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More than three million smokers have changed 
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On your Radio, OLD GOLD— PAUL WHITEMAN HOUR. Paul Whiteman, with his complete orchestra, every Tuesday, 9 to 10 P. M., Eastern Standard Time 



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Telephone 1364 129 N. Tejon 



THE J. S. BROWN 

MERCANTILE 

COMPANY 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



LOOK YOUR BEST 

Have your hair cut in the 
approved manner. 

Pete's Barber Shop 

8 E. Cucharras Si. 



Two Full Pages of Pictures 



(See pages 8 and 9) 







BEAT AGGIES! 






jSl "Dutch" Clark 

All American 
Quarterback 




Tiger Captain 
Starts Last 
Campaign 









-^rr ^= *^eather Forecast 



Page 3 

'\ggie Game Doped Page 3 

Bon Fire Burns Tonight Page 4 

students Parade Page 5 




Editorial Office— 23 West Colorado Ave. 



October 11, 1929 



THE TIGER 




I^ins Shearer Suits 



Offer more for thirty-five dollars 

than just thirty-five dollars worth 

We set out not to sell a thirty-five dol- 
lar suit, but to crowd greater values in- 
to our $35 than the price customarily 
brings. Finer fabrics, rarer patterns; 
richer tailorwork; smarter styles; long- 
er wear; more value for yourself and 
more compliments from others — at only 
$35. Brown and tan are the prevailing 
shades for fall in both suits and top- 
coats. 



Dine and Dance 

a^ THE COLLEGE INN 

SPECIAL STUDENT LUNCHES 25c 




GRAIN5 

In Black or tan shown at 
Vorhes in Brogue Style 

$8.50 and $11.50 

Sturdiness, dependability and clean cut appear- 
ance in every pair — economical for college men. 



Issued Friday of each week. Entered at the Post Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter. 



(THDE9 TieBR 



VOLUME XXXII 



Colorado College Weekly News Magazine 



Number 4 



SENIORS AND FRESHMEN 
HOLD CLASS ELECTIONS 



flarmon, Sheldon, Smith, Seeley, 

Walters, Herbert, Skidmore, 

And Metzler Are Elected 



The freshmen and the seniors 
held their election of officers yes- 
terday after the pep meeting. . In 
the freshman class, Walters won 
presidency by a large plurality, 
Herbert is vice-president, Skidmore 
was elected secretary by the larg- 
est vote of the day, and Metzler 
secured treasurer by a sufficient 
plurality. In the senior elections, 
Harmon defeated Robinson for pre- 
idency, Sheldon won the position 
of vice-president from Aaby, Beth 
won the secretaryship, and Seeley 
defeated Vestal by one vote for 
treasurer. 

The election figures follow: 
SENIOR:— Pres. Harmon 18, Rob- 
inson 12; Vice. Pres. Sheldon 21, 
Aaby 8; Secretary Beth Smith 14, 
Meston 7; and Treasurer Seeley 
14, Vestal 13. FRESHMAN: — 
Pres. Walters 80, Dial 63, Grant 
22, Williams 21; Vice Pres. Her- 
bert 80, McMillan 62, Easten 42; 
Sec. Skidmore 120, MacDonald 
64; Treas. Metzler 87; Russell 54. 
and DeHoltzer 45. 

Nearly 190 votes were cast by 
the Freshman class, however t h e 
seniors cast only thirty which is less 
than half the number of the enroll- 
ment of that class. 



WEATHER FORECAST 

The weather for Saturday 
afternoon will be fair with 
possibility of a few clouds, 
but no snow, according to 
Harry Figge, operator of the 
Colorado College Weather 
Observatory. It will be a good 
idea to take a blanket to the 
game. 



Tse Euterpe Musical Society will 
meet on next Tuesday evening, Oc- 
tober 15, at 7:30 o'clock. (The 
place of meeting will be announced 
later). All students are cordailly 
invited to be present. 



AGGIES AND TIGERS WELL MATCHED 
FOR TDMORROW'S GRIDIRON BATTLE 



Colorado College Opens Season Against Colorado Ag- 
gies ; Van de Graaf f And Hughes Are Expected To 
Open Up So Game Promises To Be A Real Battle 



Koshare Picks Cast to Present Ibsen 



Koshare has chosen for its first 
production, "The Wild Duck", one 
of Ibsen's best dramas. After the 
tryouts last Tuesday night Mr. 
Sharp explamed that the cast he 
had picked was not necessarily 
permanent, and that in case some 
member did not turn out to fit his 
part, more tryouts would be held 
and a change made. Two girls 
have been chosen for the part of 
Gina, and the one best suited will 
be kept after rehearsals prove the 
merit of each. The present cast is: 

Werle Fred Nichols 

Gregers Werle L Chaney 

Old Ekdal Morley Brandborg 





Publish '^Bigger & Better" Programme 

At the Tiger-Aggie game tomorrow, there will be a beautiful illus- 
trated souvenier program available for the fans. In it will be all the 
changes in the football rules, penalties, and a complete conference 

schedule as well as pictures 

of the entire Bengal squad 

r nd coaches and numerous 

pictures of the stars of the 

Farmer's team. The feature 

of this program is a color 

picture of "Dutch" Clark rip- 
ping through the Aggie line in 

the 1927 battle. This picture 

was taken from the well- 
known "All American" photograph used by the Associated Press. Other 
notables of this picture are the Tiger captain of 1928, Vandenberg, 
Rankin, Aggie star of '27, and Herb Dana, well known referee. 

It is advisable for everyone to procure a program as "Bully" Van 
de Graaff is as yet undecided who will start the game. This program 
will be sold at the game on Saturday for a nominal sum, and every 
booster will want one as a souvenir of the 1929 Colorado College-Colo- 
rado Aggie game. 

Through the efforts of "Bill" Hinkley and "Doc" Weaver .this pro- 
gram was published, and a great deal of credit and appreciatoin is due 
these two men. 



Mialmar Ekdal Jim Keyser 

Gina Ekdal, Larry Johnson, Mary 
Strachan 

Hedvig Eleanor Tremayne 

Mrs. Sorby Suzanne Walker 

Dr. Relling .Bill VanDyke 

Milvik .....Gene Lague 

"The Wild Duck" is an ambitious 
production, but it is typical of the 
hightype of drama which Koshare 
has planned for this year, and the 
members feel confident of success 
under the direction of Mr. Sharp. 

In this play Ibsen is trying to 
show his followers that they must 
not carry his idea of the place of 
Truth in life too far. In his play 
"Ghosts", Ibsen presents Truth as 
the saving element in life, and in 
"The Wild Duck" places another 
phase before us. Briefly the story 
is that of an earnest but misguided 
young man who seeks to bring hap- 
piness into the home of his friend 
by breaking down all illusion and 
baring the truth. The title is sig- 
nificant and the allusions to the 
wild duck of the paly symbolic. It 
is known that the wild duck, when 
wounded, dives down to the depths 
and becomes tangled in the weeds 
rather than be caught. Hailmar is 
symbolic of the duck living in the 
depths, immeshed in illusion and 
Gregers is the dog which dives af- 
ter it and brings it to the surface 
alive, but with wounds which can 
never heal. 

No date has been set for the per- 
formance as Mr. Sharp told the 
cast that for such a play the great- 
est amount of study and hard work 
is necessary to put over its signif- 
icance, and this cannot be done in 
a hurried way. 



By Chauncey H. Blodgett, Jr. 
Tomorrow afternoon on Washburn Field, the kick off of the Colo- 
rado College-Colorado Aggie game will ring up the curtain on the Tiger 
conference season, and open a game that promises to be the hardest 
fought of any on this side of the conference. Both teams come into 
the game with the highest of reputations as to aggressiveness, speedy 
play, and all-around smooth football. 

The Tigers are putting their best onto the field tomorrow after- 

noon. The backfield has all the 

needed qualities, with line plungers, 
shifty broken-field runners, the best 
pass snaggers, and the incompar- 
able "Dutch" to back up the elev- 
en with his bewildering attack that 
he will spring on the farmer men. 

Jones, Hinkley, and Reid seem 
to have drawn the lucky numbers 
for the backfield berths. They form 
a combination that is hard to beat, 
and not only can give Clark some 
real interference, but promise well 
as ground gainers for the Black 
and Gold machine. 

There has been considerable 
shifting of men in the line, as well 
as in the backfield, and until the 
opening whistle, the line-up will not 
be known. Doc Weaver seems to 

(Continued on page 13) 

MAKE FINAL SELECTION 
OF WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 

The final selection of the Colo- 
rado College Glee Club members 
has been made and includes the fol- 
lowing girls: 

First Soprano — Margaret 
Rhoades, Helen Huffman, Dorothy 
Underwood, Gail Dein, Rosella Bur- 
bank, Marge Southmayd, Alice Gil- 
lett. 

Second Soprano — Wilmoth Har- 
ris, Helen Hummel, Frances Ward, 
Marian McCleary, Ruth Tom 
Frane, Margaret Melis. 

First Alto — Louis Sherman, Flor- 
ence Bowe, Margaret Whalener. 
Second Alto — Irene Slane, Jessie 
Tuson, Frances Smith, Gladys 
Johnston. 

Helen Huffman will be president 
of the Glee Club this year. She 
will be assisted by Alice Gillett as 
Secretary-Treasurer and Rosella 
Burbank who will act as Librarian. 



THE TIGER 



Copeland In Hospital 
Because Of Operation 

William D. Copeland, secretary 
of Colorado College, while on a 
short business trip to Denver last 
Saturday, suffered an attack of ap- 
pendicitis. He was taken to t h e 
Presbyterian hospital where he un- 
derwent tonsilectomy and appen- 
dectomy operations. He is swiftly 
recovering and is expected to re- 
sume his work at the college with- 
in the next two weeks. 



Our Goal 

Is Your 
Friendship 



There's real teamwork going 
on here — every man on the 
job, no fumbles, and our 
friends rooting for us. 

When you see our 
fall '29 styles you'll 
be on our side, too. 



CLOTHING CO. 

24 S. Tejon 



PEP RALLY TO BE HELD 
WITH BONFIRE TO-NIGHT 



jrowlers' Club, Tiger Club, And 
Band To Aid With Cdebration 
Assistant Coaches To Speak 

PEP! PEP!! PEP!!! That's 
what is going to make Cossitt's sta- 
dium ring tonight. All afternoon 
the Freshmen .have been busy get- 
ting wood for the huge bonfire. 
And at 7:30 the match will be ap- 
plied to the biggest and best Pep 
Meeting ever. 

Dt. C. C. Mierow will deliver an 
address, and Wilson, President of 
the Student Body, will also speak. 
The two new coaches, Pickard 
and Herigstadt, have a few words 
of enthusiasm for the meeting. The 
band will be there tonight in full 
regalia, and their first appearance 
will be a signal for a rousing cheer. 
Nothing will add more to the meet- 
ing than the Growlers' Club, who 
will turn out in a body tonight. 

The meeting will be short, snap- 
py, full of pep. It is the duty of 
every student to attend the first 
rally of the year, the beginning of 
the football season. So let's see 
everybody at the stadium tonight. 



t.- 



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TWENTY FIVE REPORT 
FOR BAND PRACTICE 

By Carl Burke 

With enthusiasm at a high pitch, 
the re-organised C. C. band is get- 
ting under way in fine shape with 
the hopes of building a worthwhile 
musical organization that will con- 
tinue on a permanent basis from 
one year to the next. 

In place of the haphazard way in 
which the band has been organized 
heretofor, the attempt this year is 
to found it on a scholastic basis, 
offering an hour's credit per semes- 
ter for work in the band, thereby 
placing it on a class level which will 
insure steady rehearsals the year 
aroUnd as well as a constant and 
large personnel. At the time of 
writing, the credit is not absolutely 
assured, but reports indicate that it 
will be granted. 

If the band is organized on this 
basis, it will be alloted a regular 
time for practice, during which mil- 
itary drills and manuevers will be 
practiced in addition to the regular 
rehearsals. The band is now work- 
ing on the new school songs which 
c.re being introduced this year as 
well as some peppy novelty num- 
bers to be used at the games. 

The greatest handicap at present 
IS the lack of some of the most es- 
sential mstruments such as the bass 
horns; Sousaphones, baritones, and 
basses. These form the back-bone 
of a band, and the lack of them is 
keenly felt, but plans are under 
way to get two Sousaphones, an 
upright bass, and at least two bari- 
tones. At present, a complete new 
drum outfit and one baritone have 
been purchased. 

Officers and members of promi- 
nent organizations around school, 
including the A. S. C. C, Associ- 
ated Women's Student Council, 
Tiger Club, and the Growlers' Club, 
have indicated that they will boost 
the band and support it in its drive 
sound organization. 

Those who are playing in the 
band include Kintz, Crouch, Burke, 
Stillman, Baylis, Jencks, Perryman, 
Bull, Griffith, Conover, Morrell, 
Britton, Larson, Shock, Knodel, 
Haney, Johnson, Houghton, Craw- 
ford, Willie, Burshears, Sentry, En- 
gelbretson, and January. 



W. I. Lucas 

HAS 
EVERYTHING IN 

SPORTING GOODS 
"Tigers always welcome" 

119 N. Tejon St. 
Main 900 



Forestry Club To Have 
Next Meeting We( 

The next meeting- of the Pik( 
Peak Forestry Club will be held 
the home of Professor Gordi 
Parker on Wednesday evenir 
October 30 at 7:30 o'clock. Eve 
forester is urged to be present ai 
make this meeting one of the b< 
of the year. 



PLAZA HOTEL BEAUTY SHOl 

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Starting Sun. Oct. 13 




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Nights 

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THE TIGER 



''The Big Parade'' of Colorado College 



By T. C. Tate 

THE TIME— Saturday ten A. M. 
THE PLACE— From Murray's Dru 
Store to most anywhere. 
CONTINUITY— By hundreds of 
C. C. students who will be seen 
plunging, in formation, down Tejon 
Street letting Colorado Springs and 
the world know that this Colorado 



for hot, clean 

clinkerless fuel 

—call the "coal phone" 

M 577 





College has a football team that 
contends to be the best. That it 
has a student body — equal to any 
— heart and soul and predominent- 
ly vocal in its support of that team. 
They will be marching, in a line, 
hands on the shoulders of the pre- 
ceding "heralder of support" sing- 
ing, yelling, cheering, and untim- 
idly working-up a spirit that will 
climax that afternoon when our 
Black and Gold footballers annex 
a victory from the Colorado Agri- 
culturalists. 

There have been "Thundering 
Herds" of football — "Geniuses" of 
invention — "Tigers" of the ring and 
renowned "something" of most 
everything; but the C. C. "Jugger- 
naut" of enthusiasm surpasses them 
all when it winds its way through 
the streets in an unrelentless spirit 
drive. 

Be at Murray's Drug Store at 
ten o'clock Saturday morning and 
Join the "Big Parade" of thunder- 
ing "Tigers" that will march for a 
cause, not for humanity, but for 
the spirit of C. C. Be one of the 
army of "sprites" that marches in 
the morning and then come out 
1 1 and support the army of Captain 
"Dutch" C'ark and the successful 
general of football armies — W. T. 
"Wolf" Van de Graaff that after- 
noon. 



TOMPKINS RESIGNS AS 
MINISTER TO COLLEGE 



Dr. Seeley K. Tompkins, t h e 
chaplain of Colorado College, and 
pastor of the First Congregational 
Church here, will resign his position 
and will leave the ministry perma- 
nently on December 31, according 
to a recent announcement made by 
him. 

Dr. Tompkins stated that for the 
last ten years he and his family 
had considered leaving the minis- 
try, but his decision came when 
conditions in the church made it 
impossible for him to remam there. 

Dr. Tompkins came to Colorado 
Springs m 1926. He was gradu- 
ated from Oberlin College (Phi 
Beta Kappa) in 1901. He taught 
for nine years at Oberlin Academy, 
Carleton College and Iowa State 
Teachers' College. He then went 
to Yale Divinity school where he 
graduated (Magna Cum Laude) in 
1913. He received his D. D. de- 
gree from Miami University. 

Dr. Tompkins has not yet decid- 
ed what branch of business he in- 
tends to follow nor whether he will 
remain in Colorado Springs. 



Sisam Attends Meetings 
Of Mathematical Ass'n. 



Professor C. H. Sisam, head of 
the Department of Mathematics, at- 
tended the joint summer meetings 
and the colloquium of the American 
Mathematical Society and the 
Mathematical Association of Ameri- 
can at Boulder on August twenty 
sixth to thirtieth. Professor Sisam 
was chairman of the program com- 
mittee for the Association. 



4. 



Yell Leaders Chosen 

With Peppy Try-outs 

After an enthusiastic tryouts in 
which technique, athletic contor- 
tions and skill were portrayed with 
no mean ability, the cheer leaders 
for the coming year were selected 
at the student assembly on October 
3. Applauses in the forms of 
cheers, shrieks, and whistles rang 
throughout Perkins Hall as popular 
vote proclaimed the favorites. 

The three chosen were Nelson 
Brown, Alvin Griffith, and Donald 
Haney, who, in case of doubt, may 
be referred to as "Nellie," "Red," 
and "Don." The former is a sur- 
vival of last year's pep conductors, 
while the latter two are new in the 
acstretic game. 

Through the courtesy and gene- 
rosity of the College Cleaners, new 
outfits have been presented to the 
cheer leaders. They will be at the 
game on Saturday in full regalia to 
urge on the deafening din as we 
"Beat Aggies." 



NOTICE 



There will be an nnportant meet- 
ing of the Inter-Society Council on 
Monday, October 14, at 3 o'clock 
in the Student Government room in 
Bemis. 



EAT 'EM UP TIGERS 

Then come down and eat 
that tasty 
Confection 

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THE TIGER 



EDITORIAL 



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Association 




The Colorado College 

Newspaper, 

Published Weekly by the 

Students. 



THE TIGER 



LLOYD H. ELLIS Main 1975 Editor 

JAMES PATTERSON Main 2575 Manager 



This Week's Staff. 

The editorial staff includes Cliff Goodson, Art Baylis, Hermena 
Kahn, Byron Whaley, Chauncey Blodgett, Jr., Marjorie Gilbert, Ivan 
Schweninger, William Van Dyke, Margaret Gillen, Hartley Murray, Ken- 
drick Stone, Carl Burke, Mark Perkinson, Mary Strachan, Donald Hor- 
ton, Wayne Campbell, Marjorie Ferguson, Melba Adams, Ralph Smith, 
Wilmoth Harris, William Baker, Fred Nichols, Velma Rose, Effie Gil- 
bert, Genevieve Engel, and Pat Johnson. 

The managerial staff includes Frank Dentan, Nelson Brown, Harry 
Wood, Theo Thulemeyer, Bill Hinkley, Merrit Ritter, and Glenn Wade. 



We Wai "Beat Aggies". 

Tomorrow afternoon, the Colorado College Tigers will open their 
football season by playing the Colorado Agricultural College. For over 
a month, men have been practicing in Washburn Field preparing them- 
selves for tfiis first game of the season. Only a small proportion of 
these men will see action on the gridiron tomorrow. It should be re- 
membered that it is not the first team alone that makes a winning foot- 
ball team. Some fellows have a tendency to joke and make fun of the 
second string men. When a man practices and works every afternoon 
from four until six o'clock and even while working, realizes that he has 
little chance to make the team, that man should be praised for his school 
spirit. If some of those smart fellows would "work out" a few evenings, 
they would realize how much the second string man is worth and just 
how many hard knocks he has to take. 

This football season ought to be one that will be remembered by 
the football fans of the college. In years to come, old "grads" will 
look back and recall the football team of '29. In every part of the 
game, C. C. is ready to meet the Aggies. "Dutch" Clark is rounding 
into All American form. Colorado College has never had such a coach- 
ing staff in its history. For the first time in years, there are a number 
of good men to fill every position. In only one case will injuries keep 
veterans on the bench. 

The Growlers' Club promises to have the peppiest organization 
since its establishment. The Band is practicing several nights a week, 
and has all the college songs down in great fashion, and is planning a 
number of specialties. The Freshman class is the best ever, and is 
backing the team to the limit. The student body will be at the game 
to a man, guided by three good yell leaders. Without a doubt, Colo- 
rado College is set to "Beat Aggies." 



Our Faculty. 

Too few of the students of Colorado College in the flury of ath- 
letics, dramatics, and society realize how much time is spent on the out- 
side activities and so little time is spent on the scholastic side of college 
life. To a great number of people outside of the college, the name 
"Colorado College" represents a small school with a tricky fighting foot- 
ball team. 

But there are many others who realize that Colorado College is in 
a class of its own as a school of learning. Students come from many 
parts of the country to matriculate here. Scholars look toward Colorado 
College with the idea that it is a center of learning. Neither the high 
tuition nor the hard entrance requirements alone have brought about 
this feeling. The fact that we have a faculty interested in writing, re- 
search, and scholarship brings this to pass. Few of us realize how im- 
portant members of the faculty are in their field. In the faculty, there is 
an innumerable group who write books, write articles in well known 
periodicals, and make discoveries which are of great worth to science 
and to the arts. 



CONSTITUTION? 



For what purpose is our consti- 
tution, when we disregard it at 
every turn? This much mahgned bit 
of legislation states, "The yell 
leaders shall be selected by the Ath- 
letic Committee from nominations 
submitted by the Enthusiam Com- 
mittee." Yet we find the same hit 
and miss method used in the ap- 
pointments of yell leaders for this 
year. A hand is held over a good 
looking boy's head, his fraternity 
brothers and some of the girls ap- 
plaud, then arbitarily with no re- 
gard for qualifications or services 
someone says that this man re- 
ceived the greatest applause and is 
therefor legally elected yell leader. 
Is this any proof of ability or quali- 
fications? 

We hear that the student council 
in all its wisdom decided to follow 
the constitution in this matter this 
year. Then why did they change 
their mind all of sudden. Let us 
watch this and try to follow laws 
that were made. If they are not 
good rules, there is nothing to pre- 
vent a legal change but to decide 
on the spur of the moment that 
such and such is to be done is cer- 
tainly not student government. 

— w. c. 



lAM TEMPUS AGI RES 

This being a year during which 
the memory of Virgil is especially 
considered, it is fitting that his 
words should be our text. More 
fitting because an organized effort 
is being made now to bring Colo- 
rado College to a position of prom- 
inence long since deserved and 
truly merited. Two and one-half 
millions of dollars for endowment, 
one million for buildings, a student 
body of one thousand. Ah! there's 
the rub. 

To reach the latter goal neither 
money nor buildings will alone 
serve as sufficient drawing power. 
Now is the time to give the women 
of the campus a talking argument 
to draw more women — Sororities. 

The educational institution of to- 
day gives its graduates cultural and 
social standing in the post college 
world. Colorado College women 
rre under a severe social handicap 
when associating with graduates of 
sorority institutions. 

Why not weigh carefully the ef- 
fect on the 1000 student goal, of 
introducing lo Colorado College the 
social advantages enjoyed in other 
instilutions of like size. 

Dux Femina facti. — G. E. 



FROSH RINGING CUTLER BE 



Worldly-wise freshmen have be 
seen in the gym and out behind I 
barn practicing exercises to strei 
then the muscles of the trunk a 
arms. A victorious season for t 
Tigers is going to mean late hoi 
and heavy duty for the class of 
at ringing the bell in the bleak to 
er of old Cuder Hall. Unfortunal 
ly no other practice is permitted, 
the bell is bound by tradition to i 
rung only after victories of 1 1 
Bkck and Gold in athletics — b 
then, ah! then, the ears of t 
countryside thirst for those cle 
tcnes until well after midnight. 

To prevent squabbling and tl 
resultant soiling of the gay yellc 
cips our sextons will wear, \ 
deign to suggest that some degr 
of organization should be attemp 
ed, whereby the freshmen of t h 
several fraternities have charge 
the bell for specified intervals. / 
excursion into the upper reaches ' 
Cutler Tower by daylight is al; 
conducive to efficiency and safe 
from contusions of the head and e 
bows. Let's prepare to ring tl 
Aggies a lusty iron farewell. -tS. 



THE SUB 



Crisp autumn afternoons — bri 
liant colors — pretty coeds wdth shr 
voices — laughter — squads on tl 
field — flashy backs — cheering- 
touchdowns — victories and defea 
— tired, sweating players — all th 
is football. 

You who are one of the thou 
ands that pack stadiums throughoi 
the land to see the clashing of pov 
erful teams, to watch the speed an 
skill of athletes trained into perfe( 
precision — you who delight in t h 
spectacular — do you ever consid( 
the "sub," the man who just is n( 
good enough? Do you ever paui 
to wonder what those on the bene 
are thinking, hoping? Do you ev( 
imagine the dreams of the huddle 
form in the third-team jersey? 
strange power prompts these "subs 
to play a losing game — and pla 
hard. This is what the brilliant p< 
rade forgets. 

The "sub" sits on the bench an 
watches others play the game Ii 
loves. He longs for a chance; h 
would give anything to be in t h 
game for just one minute. But dii 
appointment piles on disappoin 
ment till the final gun sounds. The 
he turns to the locker-room lookin 
forward to another week. His i 
an echoless sacrifice that make 
football the glorious game that 
is! He is a great football playei 
the "sub". — N. ( 



THE TIGER 



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Sugar the essential food. 

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New Fords 7c per mile; 
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New Cheve Six's . to 8c per 
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Office 

ELK HOTEL 

Phones M. 346 and 2065 
Free Delivery 



WHY NOT 

Learn Typewriting 
while attending Col- 
lege? Your teachers 
will appreciate type- 
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checked. We can ar- 
range hours to suit 
your convenience. 



^Imt-i 



SOCIETY 



Sigma Chi Pledge Dance 

Beta Gamma of Sigha Chi enter- 
tained at the chapter house, Friday 
night, October 4, honoring their 
pledges, Emra Butler, Raymond 
Fries, Emanuel Martin, Marvin Rus- 
sell, Henry Miller, Clark Schnurr, 
Merritt Ritter, Harry Onufrock, 
Ed Blaine, Harry Burton, Theo. 
Thuemeyer, John Vandemoer, John 
Erickson, Loren Chaney, and Bill 
Thomas. 

The guests were Professor and 
Mrs. F. M. Okey, Mr. and Mrs. L. 
C. Lennox, Mr. and Mrs. H. G. 
Frantz, Mr. and Mrs. Chase, Mr. 
and Mrs. M. J. Mosley, Raymond 
Mosley, Charles Page, James Br 11, 
Alex Shakus, Maurice Lewis, and 
the Misses Betty Fuller, Frances 
Young, Beulah Campbell, Marjorie 
Morrell, Marian Fee, Mildred Haz- 
lett, Rebecca Todd, Dorothy Trot- 
ter, Gladys Johnson, Lillian Gibbs, 
Patricia Haney, Myra Reinking, 
Kathleen Keating, Janet Jacobson, 
Irene Baker, Ethel Parks, Edwina 
Creighton, Hermena Kahn, Dorothy 
Underwood, Margaret Christmas, 
Margaret McCleary, Frances Mills, 
Mary Jane Hayes, Virginia Patter- 
son, Serena Williamson, Marian 
Coles, Lois Dunkle, Dorothy Nail, 
Margaret Enyart, Delma Wright, 
Margaret Bradfield, Charlotte Pip- 
kin, and Bessie Shepard. 



Phi Gam Dance 

Honoring their pledges, Chi Sig- 
ma of Phi Gamma Delta held their 
pledge dance on Friday evening, 
October 4. The pledges honored 
were: Steve Allison, William Bak- 
er, John Bennett, Art Bishop, Har- 
old Britton, Jean Lague, John Metz- 
ler. Gale Middlestetter. Hartley 
Murray, Fred Nichols, Duane Os- 
born, Barratt O'Hara, H, Jack 
Rorer, Raymond Ryan, Ivan 
Schweninger, Robert Stillman, and 
Harold Weidman. 

The guests included Phyllis 
Ormsby, Doris Simmons, Sally Shel- 
don. Genevieve Engel, Dorothy 
Faus, Marie Heller, Melba Adams, 
Velma Rose, Mary Elizabeth Pitts, 
Margaret Kimzey, Olive Klein, Lo- 
na Dreuhl, Dorothy Horn, Pat 
Warren, Annabel Drummond, Wil- 
moth Harris, Louise Buckley, Har- 
riet Floyd, Mildred Strachan, Angus 
Welch, Alberta Jones, Irene Saun- 
ders, Martha Herbert, Dorothy Rus- 
sell, Gail Burnett, Catherine Hood, 
and Freddie Pickard, William Hill- 
house, Chub Ryan, Jim Simon, 
Earl Bickford, Mr. and Mrs. Jim- 
my Jacobs, and Mr. and Mrs. Earl 
Harvey. The patrons and patron- 
esses were Mr. and Mrs. Frank Ev- 
ans, and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Dern. 



Delta Alpha Phi Initiation 

On Sunday afternoon, October 
sixth, the Delta Alpha Phi frater- 
nity held the formal initiation ot 
four new members. James Craig, 
of Cotopaxi, Colorado, Earl Coch- 
j rane, Charles Armstrong, and Win- 
j throp Martin, all of Colorado 
Springs, were the initiates, in whose 
I honor a dinner was given Sunday 
I evening at the Plaza Hotel. Among 
those attending were Dr. C. C. Mie- 
I row, Dean C. B. Hershey, and Pro- 
' fessor F. M. Okey, each of whom 
' gave a short after-dinner talk. 



Phi Delta Theta Dance 

Honoring their new pledges, the 
Phi Delta Theta fraternity gave 
their regular "pledge dance" last 
Friday evening at their Chapter 
house, 1 105 N. Nevada Ave. 

The new pledges are Dick 
Grant, Eddie Cass, Jim McElvain, 
"Doc" Guelick, Bill Bradshaw, 
"Speed" Deutsch, Don Haney, Ed 
Johnson, Joe Mercer, Stan Ryer- 
son, "Swede" Roark, Lots De Holt- 
zer, Frank Randall, Gene Randall. 

The house was very effectively 
decorated to represent the interior 
of a prison. One of the many nov- 
elties was that of collecting all of 
the hall girls in a regular police pa- 
trol. Warrants for each girl's ar- 
rest were issued, and they were con- 
ducted by uniformed guards to the 
dance. 

The guests were Margaret 
Gragg, Matilde Willis, Alyce Ire- 
land, Kay Poland, Margaret Tim- 
mons, Ruby Brewer, Mary Galla- 
gher, Betty Skidmore, Helen Han- 
ey, Margaret McClellan, Helen 
Hibbent, Hildegard Norton, Anna- 
bel Hutchinson, Mable Honea, Alice 
Aaby, Ruth Tom Frame, "Boots" 
Todd, Martha Katherine Shearer, 
Pat Johnson, Eva Crowder, Hester 
Jane Butcher, Margaret Killian, 
Mary Jo Chamberlain, Lorrain 
Dean, Helen Kerr, Virginia Dewey, 
Beth Smith, Harriet Detienne, Sal- 
ly Oliver, Joe Campbell. 

The chaperons were Mr. and 
Mrs. W. M. Jaillite, and Mother 
Baker. 



Wear a Tiger "Woolie" and "Mum" 
to the Game. 




The Trip that Bankrupts the 
English Language 

CORLEY 

Mt. Highway 

Cripple Creek in high gear 



-^OMtUA 




TENT PAWNING CO. 



Awnings and Camp Supplies 



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CAMPBELL'S 

BARBER SHOP 



109 East Pikes Peak Avenue 



A Publix Theatre 



BURNS 
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Starts 
SUNDAY 




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Phone M. 214 



with 

NICK LUCAS 

CONWAY TEARLE 

WINNIE LIGHTNER 

ANNE PENNINGTON 

Home of Paramount Pictures 



THE TIGER 



BEAT AGGIES 



SPORT 



TROl 




Be In This Pi 




NINETEEN YEARS AGO — The start of an end 
run in the Tiger-Aggie game of 1924. The game was 
played at Fort Collins on a nice balmy autumn after- 
noon. It was an extremely hard fought battle, but 
the ever aggressive Black and Gold moleskin warriors 
triumphed twenty-four to nothing. 




PARKER 





HINKLEY 



Captain "Dutch" Clark and eight 
letter men have returned to school 
to take up the burden of putting a 
strong Colorado College team on 
the gridiron. The absence of Van- 
denburg, Lacky, Berry, Osborne, 
Burno, and Schisler will be felt 
greatly on Saturday when Colorado 
College tangles with Colorado Ag- 
gies for the first Tiger game of 
the season. Last year, Parker, Hay- 
den, Weaver, Southard, and Cogan 
earned their letters in the line. 



HAYDEN 



ONE YARD to go, but the Aggies never got that 
far, because that would have put them across t h e 
goal line and given them the game. The C. C. Tigers 
buckled down in exemplary fashion and threw them 
for a loss! 




WEAVER 





THE FAMOUS "DUTCH" CU 
dling Vandenburg, heading straight I 
galore ! 



THE TIGER 



tGIES 



PHOTOS 



BEAT AGGIES 



or row Morning 



Mitn 






IRWIN 



ACTION APLENTY— Almost all of the twenty- 
two players are shown in action in this remarkable 
photograph, snapped just before the referee declared 
the ball dead. It was taken on Washburn Field. 



Clark, Hinkley, Irwin, and Ingra- 
ham carried the ball to win their 
letters. 

Even with the addition of soph- 
omores from the star freshman team 
of last year, these veterans will 
have to carry the brunt of the at- 
tack against Colorado Aggies. Clark 
Cogan, Parker and Southard will 
play their last game against Aggies 
on Saturday so they will fight their 
hardest to "Beat Aggies." 




COGAN 




FOUR YEARS AGO— Scene on Washburn Field 
during the C. C.-Aggie game in 1925. The halfback 
has just eluded the end, and is seen making quite a 
scene on his way to a touchdown. How many of the 
readers recall this incident? 




SOUTHARD 




INGRAHAM 



JH an |)icture, showing Clark hur- 
p the line. 1 h i s is real action 




10 



THE TIGER 




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No one cigarette-maker has any monopoly on 
the heat- treatment of cigarette tobaccos. 

For heat-treating is neither new nor exclusive. 
It has been used for years by practically all 
cigarette -makers to "set" and sterilize their 
tobacco. 

But OLD GOLD'S goodness does not depend on 
artificial treatment. It is the product of nat- 
urally good tobaccos . . . carefully selected for 



mildness, smoothness and flavor. Tobaccos 
made free of "throat scratch" by Mother 
Nature herself. 

Try a package. You'll immediately get the 
thrill of this smoother and better cigarette. 
And you'll know then why OLD GOLD'S sales 
are ALREADY THREE TIMES GREATER than the 
combined growth cf three leading cigarette 
brands during a like period of their existence. 



© p. Lorillard Co.. Est. 1761 



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THE TIGER 



11 



CROSS COUNTRY RUNNERS 
TRY OUTFOR FALL RACE 



Nimble aspirants to the glories of 
Mercury and Nurmi are seen each 
evening stretching their scantly 
clad triceps in fleet career over the 
leaf-sprinided paths of the jungle. 
The trees and shrubs which have 
been witnesses to many aimless 
strolls and murmured conversations 
now catch but a glimpse of the 
heels of their visitors, and the only 
sound they catch is the swish of 
rhythmic breath. With the last 
Saturday in October only a fort- 
night or so away all hands are out 
to tread the course and themselves 
into shape, and almost every avail- 
able suit of shirt-and trunks or ath- 
letic underwear is impressed into 
service. 

Manager Jo Irish has set Wed- 
nesday, October 23, as the dead- 
line for filling out an entry blank, 
but otherwise no restrictions are 
made on the runners except that 
they work out at least twice a week 
for a time long enough to build up 
stamina — and race over the proper 
course. The race will be timed so 
as to end between the halves of the 
frosh game with Wyo., at Wash- 
burn field, and will extend up 
Monument Valley Park, around the 
lake, and down again — -a distance 
of about two and one-half miles. 

Any number may enter for each 
fraternity or the independents, and 
those who finish will be listed in 
the order of their place, viz. 1, 2, 
3, etc. Then the team whose first 
four runners finish nearest the 
leader have the lowest total score, 
and on this basis will receive pos- 
sesion of the team cup. Through 
the courtesy of M. W. (Mai) Mac- 
Dougall, an mdividual cup is also 
offered, to be held by the winner 
for one year, with his name en- 
graved upon it, and passed on to 
the next year's winner. Winning 
the race three times while in col- 
lege gains permanent possession of 
the cup. 

The winner also wins a gold med- 
al, he who places second, a silver 
medal, and eight more bronze med- 
als are to be presented to those 
finishing in the first ten. 



PLAZA 

DINING 
ROOM 



•The Place to Eat" 



Breakfast 



Luncheon 



CHAIRMAN OF ASSOCIATED 
WOMEN CHOSEN FOR YEAR 

Plans for the year's activities 
and reports by various committee 
chairmen featured the regular meet- 
ing of the legislative board of the 
Associated Women Students, held 
in Ticknor Study, Monday evening, 
October 7. Randalin Trippel, pres- 
ident of the A. W. S. C. C. ,pre- 
sided. 

Publicity for the A. W. S. was 
discussed at length. Suggestions 
were made for having a permanent 
column in the Tiger, and the pos- 
sibility of utilizing exchange news 
from other similar organizations 
was considered. Charlotte Pipkin 
was appointed to act as assistant 
to Margaret Giilen, in charge of 
publicity. The advisability of us- 
ing attractive posters to replace 
the usual typewritten notices on 
bulletin boards was discussed. 

The question of freshman initi- 
ation was considered, and it was 
decided to select, each spring, a 
permanent committee of three girls 
to arrange all matters involved in 
the initiation of the in-coming 
freshmen girls. 

The Board decided that the A. 
W. S. should have a float in t h e 
Home-coming parade. The follow- 
ing girls were named as a sub-com- 
mittee to work under the direction 
of the activities committee of the 
A. W. S., in charge of arrangements 
for the preparation of the float: 
Olive Bradley, Jeanette Watts- 
Johnson, Suzanne Walker, Ruth 
MacDonald, Jean Johnson, Gretch- 
en Sherk, Ethel Smith, and Louise 
Fisher. 

The following special reports 
were given: budget committee. Le- 
titia Finn; activities committee, Jo 
Hildrich; Tiger club, Beth Smith; 
A. W. S. mass meeting, Mary Stra- 
chan; Sponsor organization, Mari- 
an Wienberger; freshman initia- 
tion, Catherine Herbert; Town 
Girls' association, Marjorie Fergu- 
son. 



To all students interested in Art 
an invitation is extended to attend a 
tea and exhibit of Minor Arts, at 
the Art Laboratory in Perkins Hall, 
Thursday afternoon, October 1 7, 4 
to 6 P. M. 



CITY COAL 

15 East Pikes Peak Avenue 

Phone 

Main 67 or 120 



VOCATIONAL PROGRAM FOR 
FRESHMAN WOMEN STARTED 



An innovation of this year will 
be in vocational counseling pro- 
gram for all freshman girls, includ- 
ing perhaps in the spring confer- 
ences with senior women who de- 
sire advice. This program will be 
in charge of Miss Helen Tufts of 
the Collegiate Bureau of Occupa- 
tions of Denver. She will make 
several trips to the College for lec- 
tures on various occupational op- 
portunities and for personal con- 
ferences with individual girls. The 
program will open with a required 
assembly for freshman girls on 
Tuesday, October 8 at which Dean 
Hershey discussed the relation of 
the liberal arts college to vocation- 
al training and the place of voca- 
tional guidance in the college 
course. 

Faculty and students, other than 
those for whom attendance is re- 
quired, who are interested are in- 
vited to attend this assembly. On 
the following Tuesday at assembly 
period. Miss Tufts will meet all the 
freshman girls. 



NOTICE GIRLS 



Any girl who has not yet received 
a hand book from the Woman's 
Student Government Council may 
receive one from the General Of- 
fice in Bemis. If she cannot possibly 
get one this way she can be taken 
care of if she will call Randalin 
Tripple. — Signed, M. Ferguson. 



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12 



THE TIGER 



Interfraternity 
Fall Matches to 
Begin on Tuesday 

In the last issue of the Tiger, it 
was announced that plans were be- 
ing drawn up by the inter-fraternity 
council for fail sports, something 
new in the curriculum of sports for 
men at Colorado College. Not only 
does it give more men a chance to 
enter inter-mural athletics, but it 
gives fraternities a chance to add 
another cup to their mantel. 

The most fitting plan, and that 
which seemed the best by the fra- 
ternity men as a whole, is a sched- 
ule of tennis and horseshoes with 
a big interfraternity swimmin 
meet to be held at the Braod- 
as a climax to the fall sports. 

For tennis and horseshoes, 
schedule has been drawn up. Each 
fraternity and the independents are 
to have one doubles team and one 
singles team. (The singles man may 
play doubles in either event depend 
ing upon the wishes of his fraterni 
ty.) No letter men m their part 
icular sport are allowed to part 
icipate. The sports start on Tues- 



This week's Candy Special 

40c lb. 



Chocolate 
Creams 



Barthel'S 

Tejon Street at 
Acacia Park Corner 



Clark and Coaches 

Fly To Ft. Collins 



Injuries or no injuries. Tiger 
hopes went sky high last Saturday 
when "Bully" Van De Graff, "Ohe" 
Herigstad, and "Dutch" Clark hop- 
ped into an airplane piloted by Bob 
Edgar and flew to Fort Collins to 
see the Aggies beat the Cowboys. 

The fame of the Tiger's aerial 
attack ihas been heard far and wide 
but it was the first time the Dutch- 
man had ever taken to the air for 
more than five or ten yards. The 
air was rather rough and then the 
plane started acting like an old ford 
wanting to jump. Although Heristad 
had his head out of the window for 
a considerable part of the journey, 
it is doubtful whether or not he en- 
joyed the scenery. Olie thought that 
he was sailing for Europe and acted 
accordingly. Van De Graff, a vet- 
eran of many air cruises, could sit 
and snicker at his tenderfoot com- 
panions. 

When the plane came safely to 
rest at the airport. Tiger followers 
breathed a sigh of relief and in that 
same breath cried out "Beat Ag- 
gies". 

day, October 1 5 at 4 o'clock in the 
afternoon. All tennis matches are to 
be held at Mounument Valley Park, 
and horseshoe matches in the Cos- 
sitt Stadium. The matches end on 
October 26. 

The schedule: 
Tuesday, October 15, 4 p. m. (ten- 
nis and horseshoes doubles) 

( 1 ) Kappa Sigma vs. (2) Sig- 
ma Chi. 

(3) Delta Alpha Phi vs. (4) 
Beta Theta Pi. 
(Schedule continued nest issue). 



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^ dictionaries of biography and geography and 

other special features. Printed on Bible paper, 

See It at Your CoUege Bookstore or Write for 

Information to the PMishcrs. Free specimen pages if you name this paper 

& C. MERRIAM COMPANY 



m^*"- 
^ 




Springfield, Mass. 



Genet al Palmer Returns to 
C. C, To Tell of Tiger Spirii 

By Mark Perkinson 
Before you I stand, the spirit of a mortal once pulsing with the 
vigor of life and freedom, even as you are now. I am clad in my olc 
brown riding clothes and wearing my black boots, once the favorite 
footwear of the members of the famous 1 1 5th. I hold in my ihand c 
quirt tho I no longer need a steed to aid me on my journey. Can yoi 
recognize me? Yes, I am your compatriot, once your fellow being 
General Palmer. 



The other night while I was mak- 
ng my weekly inspection of the 
dear old institution, I chanced to 
hear two students speak of a com- 
ing athletic contest. It seems to be 
a game with "Aggies" which I im- 
ply means with the State Agricul- 
tural College. I hesitated long 
enough to gain that it was a crucial 
struggle between Colorado College, 
my pride, and this foreign foe. And 
as I looked at the campus lying 
there so serenely beautiful in the 
clear night, I questioned the pos- 
sibility of any force successfully 
pressing its attack against that host 
of loyal supporters who form an in- 
surmountable barrier. 

But then, thought I, the weight 
of this defence lies with that team 
down there on that new grass field. 
With them, tomorrow rests the out- 
come of the struggle. I had seen 
them practicing, but in my boy- 
hood the modern game was un- 
known and hence I am unfamiliar 
with the details of it. So summon- 
ing my spirit resources, I resolved 



They're Pure" 



Chocolates Genesee 
and Vanilla 
Cream Butterscotch 
at 35c lb. 

These in assortment will 
be the delicious feat- 
ture for Saturday — 
the 12th. 



26 S. TEJON 



Dern's 



Frank Geddy Says— 

Stop here to get the fore- 
cast on the grid classic of to- 
morrow. 

EAT 'EM UP TIGERS 

The Sli33 Shop 

Across from the High School 



to find someone who would be abh 
to explain it to me. From herf 
and there over the realm of shc.dov 
I gathered old and more recent 
members of once powerful Tige 
teams. At my call myriads o 
alumni flocked to the regions o 
their Alma Mater from far distan 
vistas. 

A once great halfback and ; 
guard of no small reputation cami 
to my aid. As they surveyed t h < 
team running thru their signal prac 
tice, they gave every evidence o 
being satisfied. Certain of thi 
plans brought old reminiscences 
Turning back the pages of kale: 
doscopic Life they recalled Ion 
forgotten conquests, bringing wit 
them victories and some defeats 
tho in the end it was always to ris 
again to new heights. Other play 
afforded new interests ,and it wa 
with eagerness that they discusse 
the psychology and craft of then 
In the end the agreement seemed t 
be that the old school should giv 
quite as good as it took. 

Our group expectantly awaits tc 
morrow and the struggle. Alas, w 
are no longer men among men, bi 
the filmy shades of a dream work 
Our cheers will go unheard, ou 
battle hymns unsung, for thoug 
we still press onward or strive t 
stem the tide we will remain mut 
I and powerless. There is but o n 
influence of which we may ava 
ourselves. To those it will benef 
most, we therefore give it whole 
heartedly: 

It is that indominable persii 
tence. That unbeatable courag 
which Tiger terms have carrie 
gloriously thru the quicksands c 
defeat to the pinnacles of success 
It is the thing which makes Cole 
rado College the terror of its ac 
versaries even though outwardl 
appearing of no consequence. 1 
is the thing which in the din of bal 
tie goads men to heroic effort. 1 
is powerful and strong. We call i 
TIGER SPIRIT. It is the will t 
carry on. 

That is what we give, though i 
seem small it is mighty. A chanc 
is all it rsks, and for the sake o 
the school, for your sake and our; 
may it never end but still in victor; 
and defeat remain an undyin 
flame of greatness. 



THE TIGER 



13 



GROWLERS ARE CHOSEN 



The Growlers' Club will get un- 
derway next Saturday when they 
sponsor the big parade which will 
be staged on the morning of t h e 
Aggie game. "Doc" Vanderhoof, 
as president, and "Duke" Tucker, 
as field marshall, will lead the club 
this year. The Growlers' which is 
the men's official pep organization 
of the school, is composed of five 
men from each of the fraternities 
of the campus, and two indepen- 
dents. Their aim is to create en- 
thusiasm in school affairs, especial- 
ly in athletics, at any cost. 

On the night preceding the 
Homecoming game which is Satur- 
day, November 9, the Growlers' 
Club will entertain the school at an 
annual dance. This affair is an- 
ticipated for a long time by the en- 
tire student body and is one of the 
big social functions of the first se- 
mester. According to Vanderhoof, 
the dance this year will be held on 
Friday, November 8 at the Broad- 
moor Hotel. Very elaborate plans 
are being made for this function, 
and it should be the best and big- 
gest dance in the .history of the 
school. 

The active members of the Grow- 
lers' Club this year are: Tucker, 
Thurston, Blodgett, Bohart, James, 
Hammer, Figge, Vanderhoof, Har- 
mon, Van Dyke, Richards, McClung 
Fales, Sprenger, Noyels, Rice, 
Giesecke, Wilson, Rankin, Roebke, 
Sarkisian, Haney, Magruder, San- 
derson, Esch, Medill, Schneider. 
Fitzgerald, Coward, Keyser, Doyle, 
Kennedy, Jacobs, Vestal, Wood- 
ward, Westenson, Veeder, and 
Jencks. 



Made in Colorado Springs 

VAN BRIGLE 
ART POTTERY 

The world's most famous 
art pottery. 

Visitors always welcome. 



BUICK MOTOR CARS 



Strang's 



Harry D. MacDonald 
President 



AGGIE-C. C. GAME 

(Continuea irom page i) 

have the center position tied up, be- 
ing en old hand there, and promis- 
ing well for this year. Fat Hayden 
rnd Leon Starbuck are two men 
that will give the Aggie line plays 
seme competition, should they try 
to make a hole thru either guard. 
Cogan and Elvis Starbuck will be 
on their outer flanks at tackle 
berths. 

The ends are giving Coach "Bul- 
ly" Van de Graaff a tough propo- 
sition, since injuries and stiff com- 
petition have combined to make all 
the candidates look equally good. 
Triggs, Ingraham, Warning, Heter, 
and Campbell are all making strong 
bids for the job, but until the team 
has been shifted around to suit the 
coaching staff, there is no telling 
where any of these men will end up. 

The chances are better than 
good that many of the squad will 
see action in the encounter, with 
Matheson, and McGrory leading the 
list of men that will probably get 
some action before the field of bat- 
tle is cleared. 

Reports from the Aggie strong- 
hold tend to show that they are not 
ixpectng a set-up tomorrow. Led 
by Prince, a three letter man in 
football and track, they have been 
practicing diligently since last week, 
when they came from behind to win 
their season opener with Wyoming, 

20-7. 

The Aggie style has been some- 
what cramped lately on account of 
injuries to the squad, but they will 
be able to throw practically their 
full strength at the Tigers tomor- 
row. Vaughn, who played in the 
backfield last week, is probably the 
only exception, since he was taken 
out with an injury last week that 
will keep him on the bench for two 
weeks or more. Wilson, who was 
out of the game last week, is ex- 
pected to see action again. 

No weight can be gained from 
these facts however, since the Farm- 
er reserve seems to be equally 
strong as the first team. It w a s 
largely the second eleven that put 
the game over last week against 
Wyoming, and they may be banked 
on again this week. Walt will 
probably be in Vaughn's place, and 
promises to be a threat in running 
nterference for -Ball and Bills. The 
latter replaced Day, flashy back, 
who is one of their big shots. 

Hannah and Honstein seem to 
have the wings sewed up. Captain 
Prince and Madsen start at tackle 
positions, Wright and Graves at 
gurrd, and P. Hannah at center. 

As for the outcome of the game 
— neither team is going to upset the 
apple bucket, there ain't no such 
thing. On paper the two teams are 
equal it seems, but the fighting Tig- 
ers are not going to give anything 
away- 



CLASSICAL CLUB 



The first combined meeting of 
the Classical Club and the Eta Sig- 
ma Phi was held on October 8 at 
the home of Dr. C. C. Mierow at 
which time the following officers 
were elected: Emmalou McBroom, 
president; Angeline Keen, vice- 
president; Jerry Cogan, second 
vice-president; Helen Knowles, re- 
cording secretary; Eileen Edmond- 
son, corresponding secretary; Ja- 
net Case, treasurer; and John Co- 
gan, sergeant-of-arms. 

All present and former students 
of Latin and Greek are eligible for 
membership to the Classical Club. 
From the Classical Club members 
are elected to Eta Sigma Phi. 

The Kappa chapter of Eta Sig- 
ma Phi, national classical frater- 
nity, was established at Colorado 
College in 1926. Membership to 
this fraternity is limited to students 
who have completed nine hours of 
classics and have maintained a B 
average. 

At every meeting of Eta Sigma 
Phi it is the custom to ihave some 
paper on classical subject. At the 
first meeting this year Dr. Mierow 
read Short Stories from Virgil. 



MIEROW AND HERSHEY LEAVE 



Dr. Charles Mierow and Dean 
C. B. Hershey will drive to Denver 
Friday to attend the meeting of the 
Colorado School Master's Club. 

This will be the first meetmg of 
the club for this year. Mr. Ben M. 
Cheerington of the University of 
Denver will speak to the members 
on, "The New Day in International 
Relations With Europe." 



Anyone who has a car that can 
be used to take band boys to the 
C. C. -D. U. football game should 
notify Glen Wade. 



Rhone Main 1710 

IDEAL 

1 CLEANERS 

5 West Colorado Ave. 



Valetor Pressing Service 



SUPERIOR 

Dry Cleaning Co. 

Telephone 1364 129 N. Tejc 



In Step 

with the Mode 






Every Hour! 



pvAY and night, Blue 
L-^Moon Silk Stock- 
ings serve you fashion- 
ably and faithfully. 
Lustrous, clear- 
textured, shaped to 
cling snugly . . . You'll 
find Blue Moon Stock- 
ings as beautiful on 
the last day you wear 
them, as on the first— 
and the final day a long 
way off! See them. 




IBLvy&Moohf 



1 1 1 East Pikes Peak 



14 



THE TIGER 




THE 
CAME 



in a Saunders System car, and talc* 
a gang of rooters with you. Mak* 
'em kick in for a share of the ez« 
pense and all travel for less than 
railway fare. Ask about low long 
trip rates on Model A Fords and 
new Chryslers. 



Fords — Desotos — Chrysle 
D. C. HUTCHINGS, Mgr. 
Phone Main 1800 
21 No. Cascade 



SAUNDERS 



Youvsei 



SYSTEM 




LOOK YOUR BEST 

Have your hair cut in the 
approved manner. 

Pete's Barber Shop 

8 E. Cucharras St. 




S er vices f o r your 
car that includes 

Proper Lubrication 

100% Alemite 

LEADING MOTOR OILS 
Weaverized Washing 

Tire Repairing Road Service 

Drive in Today 



FIRESTONE TIRES 
117 N. Nevada Phone M. 202 




o^<sr/p 



Blodgett, in reporting the frosh- 
varsity game elsewhere in this is- 
sue, failed to mention the sensa- 
tional runs made by Richard Van- 
derhoof. "Doc," as head lines- 
man, made neat gains for the var- 
sity on several occasions! 

BEAT AGGIES 

BETA SERENADE 

"How'd you like to darn a Beta's 
stockmgs? 

How'd you like to mend a Beta's 
pants?" 

Suddenly more than 100 pajama- 
clad girls, to whom darning and 
mending had always seemed abhor- 
rent, began to wonder shortly after 
ten o'clock, last Sunday night, Oc- 
tober 6, whether it would be so bad 
after all — this job of darning and 
mending, if — if — they could be a 
Beta's sweetheart, and perhaps 
sometime a Beta's wife! 

The clear tones of the saxophone, 
the soft accompaniment of the uke- 
lele, and the deep, celodious blend- 
ing of the Beta voices, all helped 
to set many feminine hearts to flut- 
tering, and, after the serenade, 
caused the co-eds to sigh, "Oh, 
wasn't that beautiful?" or "Gee, 
but that was thrilling." 

BEAT AGGIES 

Town Girls' Tea Dance 

The Town Girls' Association 
held a tea dance at the Minerva 
house, Saturday, October 5, in hon- 
or of the freshmen town girls. Mar- 
jorie Ferguson, president of t h e 
Association, was in charge of ar- 
rangements. The guests included 
Mrs. Louise Fauteaux ,Vona Brown, 
Dorothy Chamberlain, Florence 
Bowe, Edwina Creighton, .Marion 
Edmondson, Marjorie Gilbert, Ja- 
net Fisher, Martha Herbert, Patricia 
Haney, Jane Hedrick, Dorothy 
Horn, Norma Holmquist, Olive 
Klein, Eunice Parry, Virginia Mc- 
Kay, Charlotte Mitchell, Margaret 
Heyse, Gertrude Hammer, Georgia 
Pickett, Anna Mary McAnn, Helen 
Thompson, Jane Sutton, Serena 



HUGHE'S 
CHOCOLATES 

Try our Saturday 
SPECIALS 

Beat Aggies 



Williamson, Jean Horan, and Eliz- 
c zeth Skidmore. 

BEAT AGGIES 

Announcement has been made of 
the marriage of Miss Blanche Blaz- 
er of Cragmor to John R. Murray 
of Colorado Springs. Mr. Murray 
is a graduate of Colorado College 
and a member of Beta Theta Pi 
fraternity. The wedding took place 
in Butte, Mont., on September 23, 
and after a wedding trip to the Pa- 
cific coast, Mr. and Mrs. Murray 
will be at home in Butte. 

BEAT AGGIES 

Dt. Edith C. Bramhall is in Greel- 
ey this week-end attending the 
third annual convention of the 
American Association of University 
Women in Colorado. Dr. Bramhall 
is chairman of the legislative com- 
mittee of the state association. 

BEAT AGGIES 

Mrs. Edward R. Warren enter- 
tained c t tea at her home, 1511 
Wood Avenue, on Tuesday, Octo- 
ber 1. She had as her guests the 
following Colorado College girls 
Mrry Strachan, Jane Sutton, Vir- 
ginia Daley, Hilda Burch, and Pa- 
tricia Haney. 

BEAT AGGIES 

George Jenks, last year's editor 
of the Tiger and Melzar C. Jones, 
who has spent the last two years in 
Durango, Colo., are leaving in a 
very few days for the Capitol, 
Wash., D. C. 



— * 



THE 

WHITE WAY 

SYSTEM 

Open Until 2 A. M. 

Try our delicious White 
Way Chili 

Snappy Curb Service 

1 1 N. Tejon St. 



Colotabo 
Electrci 

28 N. Tejon 

Edison Golden Jubilee 

All next week. 

EDISON MAZDA LAMP 

Book Lamps, 
Clamp on book $3.00 



— ♦ 



The Ice Cream 
that's a C. C. 
"Institution" 

The between Class "Cones", 
I h e sandwich materials and 
candy, the ice creams and ices 
for class and club functions. 

From Frosh to Grad it's t h e 
place every Tiger knows. 

MoV^'RY'S 

Across from Campus 

Main 1183, 1184 



Broken Lenses Duplicated 

Save the Pieces 

Eyes ejiamined Lenses Groun 




TH ■ LAUTERMAN-DUGAN 

JEWELRY AND OPTICAL CO 

Jewelers, Optometrists and 

Mfg. Opticians 

Fine Watch, Clock and Jeweir) 

Repairing 
121 N. Tejon St. Rhone Main 65 



When you consider that you 
can purchase any make type- 
writer on monthly paymenb 
as small as $5.00 it is not a 
question of affording it 

The essential question is if 
you can afford to be without 
one. 




125 N. Tejon Main 95 



THE J. S. BROWN 

MERCANTILE 

COMPANY 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



Get your hair cut 
at the 

College 
Barber Shop 

Your patronage will be 
appreciated. 



THE TIGEH 



15 



CHOCOLATES 
Good as Made 

Box Goods a Specialty 
WALLACE CANDY COMPANY 



PAUDRE-PAUFFE 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Permanent Finger and Water 

Waving 

Manicure and Scalp Treatments 

Marcels 50c. 



+ 



Knorr's Market 

FOR YOUR PARTIES OR PICNICS 



Let us supply you wit: 
good things to eat 



123 North Tejon 



Phone 2602 



»«.►... 



Write your friends on 

Crested 
Stationery 

Murray's have a complete line of station- 
ery with the Crest of your Fraternity or of 
the College. 

TheMURRAY 

Drug Co. 

Across from the Campus 



Come in and let us show you some of the wondefrul values we 
have — Reasonable Prices. 
The Latest thing in hats for 
College Man at $2.50. 

Tucker Dodson Clothing Co. 

S. Tejon 



Called For— Delivered— Laundered— 
and Ready to Use 

SHEETS 7 cents 

BATH TOWELS 2 cents 

NAPKINS 1 cent 

The Elite Way 

IS the Most Economical 

PHONE MAIN 82 

''^^ LAUNDRY and 
DRY CLEANING 




A. L. STARK Typewriter Exchange 

RENTALS—SUPPLIES 
EXPERT REPAIRING 

New Portables 



REMINGTON 
UNDERWOOD 
CORONA 
ROYAL 



Sec them today 
Acrou from the Campus 




SXej 



»Co. 



When you wish 
you were in the 
other fellow's 
SHOES .. . 

and get a bit downhearted — 
and look at the clouds and 
can't see a silver lining any- 
where — 

theri's the time to go out and 
treat yourself to some new 
things to wear. It's amazing 
what a new pair of shoes, for 
Mistance, will do for a man's 
opinion of himself! Slip your 
feet into a new, keenJooking 
pair of Florsheims, and . . . 
you won't wish you were 
in any other fellow's sboesi 



16 



THE TIGER 



th 



.in me rm 



its Punch/ 




in a 



cigarette it's | AST E / 



StICKIN* to our knittin'" — never forget 
ting that Chesterfield's popularity depends on 
Chesterfield's taste . . . 

But what is taste? Aroma, for one thing— 
keen and spicy fragrance. For another, that sat- 
isfying something — flavor, mellow tobacco 
goodness — which we can only call "character." 
Taste is what smokers want; taste is what 
Chesterfield oflFers — 

"TASTE above every thirig " 





MILD ... and yet 
THEY SATISFY 



hesterfield 

FINE TURKISH and DOMESTIC tobaccos, not only BLENDED but CROSS-BLENDED 



@ 1929, LiGonr & Myers Tobacco Co. 










Obc Colorado College 



I 



|("»«|| 





OfJicial Students Publication 

VOLUME XXXII Number 5 



irai 






PIKE'S PEAK—OVK MIQHTY MASCOT 



iniNiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir^^'~^' 




Office of Publication: 23 West Colorado Ave, Colorado Springg, Colo. 



October IS, 1329 



THE TIGER 



TOR YOUR CONVENIENCE' 

We Dry Clean 

'Thone us first" 




M. 2958 



Gents* 
Hats 

Topcoats 
Tuxedos 
Gloves 
lies 

Sweaters 
Etc. 



Knorr's Market 

FOR YOUR PARTIES OR PICNICS 



Let us supply you with 
good thhigs to eat 



123 North Tejon 



Phone 2602 




Dine and Dance 



When the game is over come to the Cosmopoutan. 

You'll enjoy the food. You'll love the inasic. The 

NEW Arabian Roomis open for dinner and dancing. 

Music hy the "Seven Aces," a Columbia 

Recording Orchestra. 



The Arabian Room 

FRIDAY DANCE-9:30 to 
1:00 a. in. $1.50 per couple. 
SATURDAY DINNER 
DANCE-8tola.in.S2.50 
per plate. Dancing only, 
$1.00 per person. 




Main Dining Room 

DANCING EVERY DAY 
— 12:30 lo 2:00 p. m.Lunch- 
con,$1.00.No corercharge. 
Evening, 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. 
Dinner $2.00. No cover 
charge. 

ROOMS 12.00 DP 



HOTEL 



COSMOPOLITAM 



PlCCLY^WlCCLY 



ALL OVER THE WORLD 

FIVE BUSY STORES IN 

COLORADO SPRINGS 



Good Plumbing and Heating 

Get an estimate on your next job 

J. C.ST. JOHN 

PLUMBING & HEATING COMPANY 

226 N. Tejon St. V^AKER M. 48 



B 



AKER 
Automatic Oil 
URNER 




New 



3-Pi 



tece 

Knitted 
Suits for 

C. C. Coeds 
$11-50 

Sizes 14 to 20 

Knitted Suits are selling tremen- 
dously the country over and our 
buyer wxs fortunate to find these 
at such a low price. Skirt, slip- 
over sweeter and cardigan jacket. 
Brown, Tan, Independence Blue, 
Green, Grey, Purple, Wine and 
Capucine. 

— just one of the many remarkable 
values in our 33rd Anniversary 
Sale. 



ff)/ CU)Sv(V)OJ(^ 



Issued Friday of each week. Entered at the Post Office at Coloracfe Springs as Second-Class Matter. 



GTBEB TieJBR 



VOLUME XXXII 



Colorado College Weekly News Magazine 



Number 5 



PIONEERS AND TIGERS 
FIGHT JINX TOMORROW 



With the Aggie game under their 
belts, the Tigers leave tomorrow 
for Denver to play a team that 
promises to be the dark horse of 
the conference-Denver University's 
eleven. Jeff Cravath, their new 
coach, has raised a formidable 
material, and subsequently the hope 
of the D. U. student body for a 
faster eleven than the school has 
put out in some years. 

The Tigers came out of the 
farmer game with a whole skin 
with two mmor exceptions that will 
be remedied before the week is over 
Cogan and Harden, both linemen, 
have beon troubled with injuries 
this week, but are rounding into 
shape again. 

The Denver crew, on the other 
hand, will have to put a different 
eleven on the field tomorrow, due 
to injuries received last week when 
they defeated Wyoming. Ketchum, 
rangy end, came out of the en- 
counter with a splintered elbow, 
; nd his position will be taken 
by Hickman. Brum will play for 
Murphy, who is on the bench with 
a bruised hip. The rest of the squad 
however, will be in action. 

The Tigers will probably start the 
same eleven that opened the season 
last week against Aggies. Clark can 
be depended on in every phase of 
llie game, and will function regard- 
less of what Cravath and his men 
may plan in an attempt to bottle 
him up. With Jones, new star in 
the backfield, showing up as he did 
last week, there is little doubt that 
the line will have a backfield plung- 
er to worry the northern team. 
Ingrahc-m and Irwin or Hinkley are 
the competing pair for the back- 
field. 

The line promises to be the same. 
Hayden, and Cogan, both who re- 
ceived a bad beating last week, will 
be back again ready to go. The 
remainder of the forward wall came 
out of the encounter unscathed, and 
has been hammering away at the 
practice sessions all week. 

Those that look for a set-up vic- 
tory tomorrow are going to be due 
for a change of heart before the 
game is over. Press reports all over 
the state gave Denver credit for a 
"Powerful line, smart backfield, 
and a dangerous offense." Denver 
has an aeriel attack that the Cow- 
boys were unable to fathom, and 
they can be expected to have an- 
I other one wailing for the Tigers. 
I One of the big sports critics in the 

(C<iiitinu«l on page 9) 



Horseshoe Tennis 
Match Tuesday 

The first interfraternity activities 
were begun this week with tennis 
and horseshoe matches. According 
to Van Dyke, manager of interfra- 
ternity sports, a great deal of en- 
thusiasm and spirit are being man- 
ifest. Next week the finals and 
semi-finals will be played off. 

As a result of Tuesday's games 
the following came out victorious: 
Delta Alphs won in tennis dou- 
bles, but lost ihorseshoe doubles to 
Betas. Kappa Sigs beat Sig Chis 
in tennis and horseshoe doubles. 

The results of Wednesday's 
games are: 

Sig Chis won from the Kappa 
Sigs in tennis singles, and the Kap- 
pa Sigs won the horseshoe singles. 

SCHEDULES 
Fridr.y, October 18, 3 p. m. (ten- 
nis and horshoe singles) 

(5) Phi Gamma Delta vs. (6) 

Phi Delta Theta. 

(7) Independents vs. (8) Pi 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 
Tuesday, October 22, 4 p. m. (ten- 
nis and horseshoe doubles) 

Winner 1 & 2 vs. winner 3 & 4 

Winner 5 & 6 vs. winner 7 &. 8 
Wednesday, October 23, 3 p. m. 
(tennis and horseshoe singles) 

Winner I & 2 vs. winner 3 & 4 

Winner 5 & 6 vs. winner 7 & 8 
Saturday, October 26 9 a. m. (ten- 
nis j.nd horshoe singles and dou- 
bles.) 

Finalists vs. finalists of the 

matches of October 22 & 23 ; 

also finalists in the consolation 

tournament. 
Consolation Tournament: 

Thursday, October 24 (tennis 

and horseshoe doubles) Losers 
(Continued on page 9) 



PEAK NAMED FOR ZEBULON PIKE 
NEVER CLIMBED BY DISCOVERER 

By Frank Seeley, major in Department of History 
Today when we speak of Pike's Peak it immediately suggests a 

variety of more or less interesting episodes, partly historical and partly 

almost as unsubstantial as the clouds which so frequently drag over its 

summit. 

In the sixteenth century and following, Spanish expeditions led by 

Zadilvav, Villaqua, Coronado and lUmana were sent into the unexplored 



ands of New Spain north of Mexico. 



ROBERT DOYLE ELECTED 
SOPHOMORE PRESIDENT 

Officers of the Sophomore class 
were selected at a special meeting 
in the Pit on Tuesday morning. For 
president, Robert Doyle received 
46 votes; Martin, 28; Drummond, 
27; Brown, 5; and Paddock, 1. 
For vice-president, Alyce Ireland 
poled 56; Katherine Herbert( 28; 
Marian Weinberger, 1 7. For Sec- 
retary, Betty Lansdown received 47 
votes; Mildred Strachan, 46; and 
Elizabeth Kennedy, 8. Pomeroy re- 
ceived 48 votes for Treasurer, Sut- 
ton, 28; and James, 27. 



Get Your Pictures Taken 

The picture contract for the 
Pikes Peak Nugget has been given 
to the Wagner-Fults Studio. Cuts 
from any other Studio will not be 
accepted because we are using a 
special background and it will be 
necessary to have uniformity. 

The pictures will be $3.75 per 
dozen, the same as last year but 
will be a better quality with a sat- 
isfactory guarantee to all. 

The final date to have your pic- 
ture taken will be the first day of 
Christmas vacation. 



Alpha Kappa Psi Names Pledges 



Alpha Kappa Psi, National Hon- 
o.ary Business Fraternity wishes to 
announce tse pleding of the follow- 
ing men : Gilbert Rice, Thomas Es- 
telle, Joseph Esch, Dave Scott, Bill 
Anderson, Ernie Walters, Oliver 
Hill, Bill Van Dyke. Russell Hen- 
ritze. Art Bayliss, Paul Conover, 
Forrest Danson, Nelson Brown, and 
John Thurston. 

Alpha Kappa Psi is a national 
honorary fraternity founded to fur- 
ther the individual welfare of its 
members; to foster research in the 
fields of commerce, accounting and 
finance; to teach the public to de- 
mand higher ideals therein; and to 



p.omote and advance in schools of 
higher learning courses leading to 
degrees in Business Administration. 

Its members are chosen for their 
high scholarship records in business 
and economic courses. The candi- 
date for membership must signify 
his intention to take a business or 
economics major and must intend 
to go four years and get his degree. 
He must also be prominent in activ- 
ities on the campus. 

A meeting was held at Cossitt 
Hall on Thursday night and Mr. 
Evans of Kirkwood's spoke on the 
opportunities and problems in the 
field of advertising. 



Their results are more inferenti 
than positive as not a word is said 
as to the Rocky Mountain Chain 
and its commanding center. Nor 
do we gain anything from the rec- 
ords of de la Harpe, who was sup- 
posed to have explored the Arkan- 
sas River to its head in 1721. Ear- 
ly in the eighteenth century, 
Canadian hunters explored the Mis- 
souri River and even the Yellow- 
stone River, and had named t h e 
Rockies the "Shining Mountains," 
but at what point is unknown. The 
Mallet brothers in 1 739 journey 
Mallet brothers in 1 739 journed 
from South Forks to Santa Fe, 
passing what they called the "Mon- 
tagnes Espagnoles," undoubtedly 
the Spanish Peasfl 

There is no further record of 
exploration in this vicinity 
until Lieutenant Zebulon Pike, on 
November 27, 1806, failed in his 
attempt to reach the top of the high 
peaks which he describes but does 
not name. 

A certain Dr. James accompany- 
ing an exploratory expedtiion under 
Major Long in 1821, with much 
labor ascended to the summit of 
the great mountain which for a 
while was known as "James" Peak. 

In 1863 the mountain was first 
mentioned in print as Pike's Peak 
by Henry Dodge in his Journal and 
Map of an Expedition to the Rocky 
Mountains in 1835. Since that time 
it has been known as Pike's Peak, 
in spite of the fact that Pike 
never named or claimed it. He did 
try, however, to reach the summit, 
but upon arriving at the top of a 
neighboring mountain exclaimed 
that "no human being could have 
ascended to its pinnacle." There 
is some doubt as to whether Pike 
climbed Cheyenne Mountain or Mt. 
Rosa, the evidence seeming to in- 
dicate the latter. 

The summit of Pikes Peak is ob- 
long and nearly level, composed 
wholly of angular slabes and blocks 
of coarse disintegrating granit. .A 
cog road and highway now lead to 
it and upwards of one hundred 
thousand people visit it each year. 



THE TIGER 



New Constitation Submitted hy Council 

For Ratification By C. C. Student Body 



CONSTITUTION AND REVISED 
CHARTER OF THE ASSOCI- 
ATED STUDENTS OF COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE 
Preamble — In order to effect a 
permanent organization and out- 
line a plan for the government for 
the students, we, the men and wom- 
en of Colorado College, adopt the 
following constitution : 
ARTICLE I — NAME AND MEM- 
BERSHIP— 
Sec. 1 — ^The name of this organ- 
ization shall be the Associated Stu- 
dents of Colorado College. 

Sec. 2 — All registered students 
in full academic standing shall be 
active members of this association. 
ARTICLE II— PURPOSE— 

The purpose of this association 
shall be to provide an effective 
means of communication between 
the undergraduate body and the 
college authorities, to exercise gen- 
eral supervision over student activ- 
ities, organizations, and customs, 
and to crystallize and activate the 
best of student opinions, doing all 
this for the good of Colorado Col- 
lege. 

ARTICLE III — THE STUDENT 
COUNCIL— 
Sec. 1 — ^The Associated Students 
of Colorado College shall be repre- 
sented by the Student Council, 
elected by popular ballot from 
among its members. 

Sec. 2 — The official membership 
of the Student Council shall con- 
sist of three Senior men, three Sen- 
ior women, two Junior men, two 
Junior women, one Sophomore 
man, one Sophomore woman, and 
one faculty member. 

Sec. 3 — Nominations — A com- 
mittee on nominations and elections 
shall be composed of the existing 
senior members of the Council, 
and they shall arrange for and con- 
duct annual nominations and elec- 
tions. 

Clause 1 — By April 15, of each 
year, the nominating committee 
shall publish a list of nominees in 
the Official Student Publication, 
such list to contain at least two 
nominees for each vacancy to be 
filled. 

Clause 2 — Following publication 
of the above list, other members of 
the Associated Students may be 
nominated by written petition, 
signed by twenty qualified mem- 
bers of the Associated Students. 
Sec. 4 — Elections. 

Clause 1 — The Members of t h e 
Student Council shall be elected 
from the nominations submitted, by 
a secret balloting of the whole stu- 
dent body. 



Clause 2 — The time of elections 
shall be the first week in May of 
each year. 

Clause 3 — A President, Vice- 
President, Secretary and Treasurer 
of the Student Council shall be 
chosen from among the Senior 
members, by the Student Council. 

Clause 4 — Vacancies in the 
Council shall be automatically 
filled by the candidate of the ap- 
propriate group who received the 
next highest score in the previous 
election. 

Clause 5 — Recall of any member 
may be effected by a majority vote 
vote in a special election called by 
the Student Council, on its own 
initiative, or upon receipt of a pe- 
tition bearing the signatures of 
fifty or more of the students. 

Sec. 5 — Organization and pro- 
cedure shall be left to the discre- 
tion of the Student Council, pro- 
vided that: 

Clause 1 — The President, Vice- 
President, Secretary and Treasurer 
shall constitute an executive com- 
mittee which shall be directly re- 
sponsible for the proper working 
of this constitution and such legis- 
lation as shall be enacted under it. 

Clause 2 — Permanent Officers 
and committees shall be established 
to carry on the business of the 
Council. 

Clause 3 — The legislation of all 
meetings of the Student Council 
shall be given official publication. 
Sec. 6 — Meetings — 

Clause I — The first meeting of 
the newly elected Council shall be 
held jointly with the retiring Coun- 
cil within one week after its elec- 
tion. 

Clause 2 — Regular meetings of 
the Student Council shall be held 
the first week of every month. 
These sessions shall be open to any 
student or faculty member unless 
special exception is taken by a two- 
thirds majority vote of the Coun- 
cil. 

Clause 3 — Special meetings of 
the Council may be called at the 
discretion of the President, or an 
petition of five members of the 
council. 

Sec. 6 — Powers and Duties — 

Clause I — The Student Coun- 
cil shall have the power to act for 
the Associated Students in legisla- 
tive, executive, and judicial matters 
pertaining to student affairs, which 
are not under the supervision of 
the college authorities, and not ex- 
pressly given to some other body. 

Clause 2 — The Student Council 
may enact temporary or permanent 
regulations applicable to any and 



all student activities, not otherwise 
duly regulated. This clause shall 
be construed to mean that all leg- 
islation passed by the Council shall 
not be interferred with by the col- 
lege authorities, unless they be- 
lieve it to be endangering the wel- 
fare of Colorado College. 

Clause 3 — Administration of af- 
fairs shall be secured by the Stu- 
dent Council, the responsibility be- 
ing centralized in the executive 
committee. Persons may be en- 
listed from the faculty or Alumni 
as official or advisory members to 
serve on committees, etc. 

Clause 4 — ^The Student Council 
shall stand responsible for the ac- 
tions of the student body as a 
whole, toward the Faculty, the 
City, and toward other Institutions, 
and shall endeavor to maintain the 
best possible relations between it 
and other persons and organizat- 
tions. 

The Council may take reasonable 
measures to enforce proper conduct 
of the students, and may advise 
action on the part of the college 
authorities. 

The interpretation of this con- 
stitution is left to the Student 
Council. 

ARTICLE IV — INITIATIVE AND 
REFERENDUM— 

Sec. 1 — Referendum — Any 
action taken by the Council, or any 
actions proposed by it, but not car- 
ried out, judicial matters excepted, 
may be subjected to a vote of the 
Associated Students, whose decision 
shall be effective for the ensuing 
school year. Such vote may be re- 
quired by a petition signed by ten 
students, or by resolutions passed 
by two classes. It shall become ef- 
fective upon a favorable vote of a 
majority of the total members of 
the Associated Students. 

Sec. 2 — Initiative — A legis- 
lative measure shall become effec- 
tive if initiated by a petition bear- 
ing the names of ten students, and 
accepted by a majority vote in a 
special election. 
ARTICLE V— AMENDMENTS— 

Sec. 1 — Amendments to this 
Constitution may be proposed i n 
writing at any meeting of the Stu- 
dent Council by not less than 10 
students, or not less than 5 faculty 
•nembers, or they may originate 
within the Council itself. 

Sec. 2 — Such proposed amend- 
ments shall be discussed in the Stu- 
dent Council, which may act as a 
body of revision, and presented for 
discussion in a meeting of the Asso- 
ciated Students. It shall be given 
official publication at least once 
before a final vote is taken. I 



Sec. 7 — The amendment sha 
become effective if accepted by 
two-thirds majority of the studen 
participating in a balloting held f( 
the purpose, and by a favorab 
vote of the faculty. 
SPECIAL ENACTMENT— 

Section 1 — This constitutic 
shall be established upon ratifici 
tion by a two-thirds majority vol 
of the Student Body, and a favo 
able vote of the faculty. 

Section 2 — Upon ratification ( 
this Constitution as provided abov 
it shall supersede the existing Coi 
stitution, and By-Laws of the A 
sociated Students of Colorado Co 
lege. 

Submitted by; (Signed) — 

Randalen Trippel, Jim Keyse 
Genevieve Engel, C. B. Hershe; 
Virginia Dewey, Lonna Dorla 
Harold C. Harmon J., Paul A. Ve 
tal, Juan Reid, C. William Penlani 
and Stewart Wilson. 



CHOCOLATES 
Good as Made 

Box Goods a Specialty 
WALLACE CANDY COMPANY 



"Better Equipped Than Ever 
To Handle College Trade." 



CAMPBELL'S 

BARBER SHOP 



109 East Pikes Peak Avenue 



T. J. Collier T. M. Colli< 

V. L. Collier 

TheCOLUER 

LUMBER CO. 

Phone Main 386 

543 W. Colorado Ave. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 



The Trip that Bankrupts the 
English Language 

CORLEY 

Mt. Highway 

Cripple Creek in high gear 



THE TIGER 



Student Directory 

To Appear Next Week 

Miss Lorrene Berger, the assis- 
tant of the secretary's office an- 
nounces that the "Student and 
Facuhy Directory" is rapidly Hear- 
ing completion. The work is al- 
ready in the hands of the printers, 
and unless unforeseen difficulties 
arise, the office hopes to be able to 
issue the publication as early as the 
twenty-first, and not later than the 
week of the twenty-eighth. 

Few changes will be made in the 
contents of the directory which 
contains in a condensed form val- 
uable information of the college 
faculty, students, activities, organi- 
zations, and curriculum. The di- 
rectory's most valuable function, 
not only to the Freshman but to all 
classes is, perhaps, that it is the ad- 
dress and phone book of the col- 
lege at large. 



HULBERT 

Professor Archer B. Hulbert of 
the history department has received 
word of the acceptance for publi- 
cation of his new book, "The Soil 
Factor in American History," by 
\ ale University Press. It will be 
published in 1930. 



Colorabo 
Electric 

28 N. Tejon 

EDISON MAZDA LAMP 

Book Lamps, 
Clamp on Book $3.00 



FRESHMAN ENROLLMENT 
LARGEST SINCE 1924-5 



October 9, 1929. 

The following enrollment figures 
showing number of students who 
have registered at Colorado College 
by the end of the fourth week of 
the term have been complied by the 
Registrar: 

Class Men Women Total 

Freshman - - 144 109 253 
Sophomore - 102 56 158 
Junior - - - 57 48 105 

Senior - - - 32 37 69 

Specials, 

Visitors and 

Graduating 

Students - 14 39 53 

Total - - - 349 289 638 
It is interesting to note that both 
the number of freshmen and t h e 
total enrollment is the largest sinct 
1924-25. A comparison of num- 
bers in the entering class and t h e 
total enrollment each year since 
1924-25 may be of interest: 

Entering Total 
Class Enrollment 



1924-25 


260 


694 


1925-26 


192 


588 


1926-27 


185 


600 


1927-28 


207 


611 


1928-29 


201 


613 


1929-30 


253 


638 



It will be remembered that t h e 
enrollment in 1924-25 was the larg- 
est in the history of the College. 
The difference between that figure 
and the present total enrollment of 
638 is largely accounted for by the 
unusually small senior class of the 
present year. This class, it will be 
noted was also the smallest entering 
class v^athin the period considered 
above. 



BIGC.C.-D.U. 
FOOTBALL DANCE 

FRIDAY NIGHT 

New Arabian Room 

HOTEL 
COSMOPOLITAN 

$1.50 per couple 

Seven Aces Orchestra 



Dean Hershey Speaks 
At Freshman Meeting 

"The purpose of a Liberal Arts 
College is to train for leadership," 
stated Dean C. B. Hershey at t h e 
assembly of freshman girls, Tues- 
day, October 8, at Perkins Hall. 

"The high school has as its task 
the providing for personal develop- 
ment of the student; the graduate, 
or professional, school trains ex- 
perts in one field of study; but the 



liberal arts school trains young men 
and women to become socially 
minded, and participate in the in- 
stitutions of society, such as fam- 
ily, church, state, and business." 

Mrs. Louise W. Feauteaux ,Dean 
of Women, presided at the meeting, 
and at the close of Dean Hershey's 
talk, introduced Miss Helen Tufts 
of The Collegiate Bureal of Occu- 
pations at Denver, who will talk to 
the girls Tuesday on the choosing 
of a vocation. 



THIS WEEK'S STAFF. 

Articles were submitted this week by Hermina Kahn, Melba Adams, 
Margaret Gilbert, Marjorie Ferguson, Clifford Vessey, T. C. Tate, Fran- 
ces Glau, Ivan Schweninger, Marie Hagemeyer, Hartley Murray, Wil- 
moth Harris, Effie Gilbert, and Fred Nichols. 

The managerial staff included Frank Dentan, Nelson Brown, Harry 
Wood, Theo Thulemeyer, Bill Hinkley, and Merrit Ritter. 



This week's Candy Special 

Wis 40c lb. 
BartherS 



Tejon Street at 
Acacia Park Corner 



Frank Geddy Says— 



D. u. 

is 
NEXT 



The Shoe Shop 

Across from the High School ! 



2^; 



Write to Dad 
for $50 

for a suit or overcoat 

Then buy a suit or overcoat here at 

$22.50 

and have $27.50 left 

You could do so and get by with 
it — as the garments we sell you 
would look, wear, fit and act like a 
$50.00 suit 

Suggest you do it — your Dad 
may need the money as bad as you 
do and he wants an honest upright 



But you could help your Dad by 
letting us save you half the price of 
your clothes. 



Sui^s, Overcoats and Tuxedos all wool, Hand Tailored — all 
models. 1100 Choice at one price. 



l\ 



20 
N. Tejon St 



$22.50 
Furmbilt Store 



p. L. THORSEN, Mgr. 



THE TIGER 



nber of Rocky Mountain 
Inter-Collegiate Press 
Association 




The Colorado College 

Newspaper, 

Published Weekly by the 

Students. 



THE TIGER 



Margaret Gillen.. 



Editor 

..Soicety Editor 



LLOYD H. ELLIS Main 1975 

Chauncey H. Blodgett, Jr Sport Editor 

JAMES PATTERSON Main 2575... Manager 

Glenn , Wade Head Newsboy 



FOOTBALL. 

The Colorado College Tigers have won one game. The student 
body knew that the Tigers had a real team, and the team showed its 
worth at the game last Saturday. Sport writers say that we have a 
team with great possibilities. We knew this before the game, and we 
must not forget it until we are through with this year's schedule. Re- 
gardless of the number of games won or lost, the football team of 1929 
is a great team. 

Just because the Colorado Aggies are behind us does not mean that 
we are unbeatable. There is no chance for the Tigers to rest with the 
present schedule. A victory over D. U. will prove to the Rocky Moun- 
tain Conference that we are of potential championship caliber. We 
must defeat Denver University. 

MID SEMESTERS. 

One quarter of the first semester of Colorado College is over. For 
a month, we have been trying to settle down from the freedom of our 
summer vacation. The new comers have heard of the old traditional 
Tiger spirit. Some have gained it. The old students realize that there 
is much before them, and that they have much to correct for their mis- 
takes of former years. Only a month, has passed, but it has been a 
long one. New friends have been made, new contacts have been started? 
Some students have seen what they have imagined college would bring, 
others are a little disillusioned. Clubs have been formed; fraternities 
and societies have selected their pledges. A football game has been 
won; class officers have been elected. 

Now is the time to hit our stride and show the faculty just what 
we are. No longer can we alibi about not being accustomed to the 
work. If we are not settled by now, we have but little time ahead of 
us. In just another month, the mid-semester will be upon us. Examina- 
tions will be given, and instructors will look back over the daily record 
and assign grades. There will be no backward step when those grades 
are given. When November 13 arrives, the faculty will have made their 
opinions concerning individual students. And opinions will be hard to 
change after that. Now is the time to show your real worth. If you 
are not getting along well in a subject, see the instructor, and tell him 
of your difficulties. You may not be studying correctly, perhaps you 
have the wrong attitude toward your work. He will understand your 
problem, and do his share. Then do it today, for in a month, we have 
ihe mid-semesters. 

CHAPEL. 

How many students of Colorado College know just what the period 
from ten to ten-thirty every morning is for? From the looks of Wed- 
nesday's chapel, there are only a few that know that there is a regular 
morning chapel held at Perkins Hall every morning during the week 
from ten to ten-thirty o'clock. On Wednesday, there was a mere hand- 
ful in the audience. There was a large choir, and a good speaker. He 
had something of interest, something of value to offer to the students of 
Colorado College. But there were only a few students gathered at 
Perkins Hall to listen to the speaker, and those few are regular in at- 
tending those meetings. 

And why do they go every morning? Every student in Colorado 
College would attend once or twice a week if he gave the chapel serv- 
ice a fair trial. The administration of the College has gone to a great 
deal of trouble to secure these speakers. The speakers use time to pre- 
pare their services. They do not "preach" for thirty minutes. They 
come to speak to the students, and they talk about subjects which are 
of interest to college students. The Thursday morning speaker. Dr. 
Roberts, offers to answer any question which a student may ask, and 
there are some interesting thirty minutes. 

Just one trial will convince many that there is something worth 
while in those short morning services. Try and attend several morn- 
ings a week, and listen to the different speakers. Certainly one of them 
will have somethinsf in common with you. Give these men an oppor- 
tuniity to get a return on their investment. 



THREE INDIAN SKETCHES By EMONDILLE 

CRITICAL NOTE:— The three Indian Sketches by Emondille offe 
an interesting study in moods and imagery. Emondille creates a clea 
and well-defined word picture, breathing the human elements into ir 
animate objects which react on the reader, and call forth a sympatheti 
response. Notice the loose form of verse, depicting, as it were, the cart 
free element in Indian lore. — John W. Hauserman, Jr. 

MOCCASIN 

Dusty old moccasins 

Hanging on the wall. 

Rough and calloused parfleche, sinew-sewed. 

How lonely is that tipi and thu buffalo hoof 

Beaded on with sinew, sleek and grisley sinew. 

Each bead a charm; each stitch an invocation to 

The festival of Dust-in-the-face. 

Dusty, grimy moccasins, hanging by your buckskin clasps, 

I often wonder how many years you've seen; — 

How many festivals you've graced; 

How many feet you've led through firelight festivals; 

How often you have hung drying over the lodge-fire; — 

How many songs are hidden in those musty ankle-feathers. 

Ah, earthy, smoked-charmed legends of festivity, 

Long after my young feet are quiet, 

Your thongs will hold you, though the cobwebs 

Will hang from your soles. You will be steeped still 

Deeper into legend, still more earthy and begrimed. 

But I'll love your smeil, your shadow on the wall. 

Dancing in the firelight. I'll love your beaded 

Tipi, and the quiet buffalo hoof, long after your 

Moldy sinews, your sleek and grisly sinews 

Have led my feet to Shadowland. 



TO A BROKEN DRUM 
Weird spirit of the dance 

Beating away the coloured minutes of ceremony, 
Jealously guarding the spirit within you, 
I hear your beat, so deep and resonant! 
In my mind, in which I guard jealously 
The vivid moments you let me snatch from you. 

Broken shell! Let me gather up your 

Shrivled, parched skin. 

Let me moisten it in the river bed. 

In the brown mud, with the flecks of gold. 

Let me mend your cracked frame, 

And stretch your skin anew with strong, young thongs. 

Let me once again imprison the spirit 

That fled when you were broken. 

Let me bring you back to life; to your 

Place beside the door-flap, with the 

Stick of lizard skin, your voice. 

TO A RATTLE 

To the beat of muffled tom-toms, 
To the rhythmic scrape of parfleche 
On the firmly-beaten earth. 
To the mystic swish of buckskin fringe. 
Dangling from frenzied arms. 
To the irregular clink of bells 
Tied 'round slim, brown ankles. 
Have your stones of turquoise rattled 
In your shell of brittle gourd. 

Now your stones are silent, lying quiet 
In your shell. 

But some day, when dry, golden winds 
Bring half-moons of campfires 
With their tipis of painted skins. 
You will once more rattle to the 
Muffled sound of tom-toms; to the 
Songs of withered voices and the 
Gray and slim horizon, as it 
Silhouettes the weary dancers of the 
Rain Dance. 



THE TIGER 



W. I. Lucas 

HAS 

EVERYTHING IN 

SPORTING GOODS 
"Tigers always welcome" 

119N. TejonSt. 
Main 900 



for hot, clean 
clinkerless fuel 
—call the "coal phone' 

M 577 




MiE¥lEW 
COAIj 



Strachan's 
Sweet 
Shoo 

Bijou and Nevada 

Try our Malts and Toasted 

Sandwiches 



of 



^x^^m^^w^ 



mum 

15 East Pikes Peak AvPnu. 

Phone 

Main 67 or 120 



PLAZA 

DINING 
ROOM 

The Place to Eat" 

tSieakfast Lunchec 

Dinner 



SOCIETY 



Honoring their pledges, the mem- 
bers of the Contemporary society 
entertained at a dance at the club 
house, Saturday evening, Oct., 12. 
The guests were Mary Frances Vol- 
Imer, Elizabeth Kennedy, Virginia 
Freudenberger, Mary Bloom, 
Virginia Patterson, the new pledges 
and Dick Haney, Clark Schnurr, 
rran Robbins, John Patterson, 
Field Bohart, Fred Hammer, 
Stewart Wilson, Tommy Hilton, 
Henry Perkins, Loren Chaney, Art 
oaylis, Joe Esch, Cecil Bender, Dick 
Waddell, Phil Duncanson, Rolana 
Anderson, and Archie Hess. Mr. 
and Mrs. W. G. Binkley and Mr. 
and Mrs. Ralph J. Gilmore chaper- 
oned the affair. 



Two pledge dances are scheduled 
for this week-end. Tonight the 
Delta Alpha Phi fraternity will en- 
tertain in honor of its pledges, and 
tomorrow evening the pledge dance 
of the Zetalethian society will be 
held. 



Beta Rho of Pi Kappa Alpha en- 
tertained at the chapter house 
Saturday evening, October 12, in 
honor of their pledges, Kenneth Al- 
derson, Owen Owens, La Mar Hill, 
Duane Brough, Bert Vandevrleet, 
Lloyd Roberts, Lester Butler, Clar- 
ence Boese, Sidney Harding, Dav- 
id McArthur, James Thompson, 
Fred Jones, Robert White, Edward 
Fitzgerald, Darcy Sihock, and Fred 
Price. The guests were Eleanor 
Watts, Jane Evans, Mildred Shive- 
ley, Nina Lee Colvin, Dorothy Un- 
derwood, Kathryn Sheafor, Miriam 
Lockhard, Olive Klien, Mildred 
Hazlett, Violet Neger, M. Brad- 
field, Beryl Grandfield, Elinor Mc- 
Cleary, Helen Mather, Marian 
Coles, Pat Johnson, Nelle Adams, 
Edna Stroud, Rosalie Lamme, Mar- 
garet England, Gretchen Sherk, 
Helen McArthur, Ida Lenore Udick, 
Yvonne Wieland, Mary Manning, 
Lulia Onufrock, Mr. and Mrs. W. 
D. Fair, and Mr. and Mrs. Jerry 
Lee of Pueblo. Dean and Mrs. W. 
W. Lovitt, Mr. and Mrs. Simon Wil- 
bur, and Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Moore chaperoned the party. 



The Town Girls' Association will 
hold its annual fall supper in Tick- 
nor Study on Friday evening, No- 
vember i. Any girl living in town 
is eligible to become a member of 
the organization if she will pay her 
dues to Geraldine Williams, treas- 
urer. Marjorie Ferguson, presi- 
dent is in charge of arrangements 
for the supper. 



Hypatia society held its pledgf 
dance at the Chapel Inn on Friday 
evening, Oct., II. The affair wrs 
given in honor of Virginia Daily, Jo 
Campbell, Adda Smith. Mildred 
canor Watts, Myra Reinking, Con- 
stance Postlethwaite, and Mcxine 
Moore, the Hypatia pledges. The 
cuests were Lucile Conroy, Dorothy 
Shultz, Lavinia Gillis, Helen Elliot, 
Peggy Meston, Margaret Killian, 
Bob Sheehan, John Thurston, Elton 
Slate, Bill Van Dyke, Dick Vander- 
hoof, Humphrey Scunders, George 
Anderson, Bill Anderson, Bruce 
Gray, Tommy Tate, Bill Twilley. 
George Robinson, Jim Keyser, Hrr- 
ry Peterson, Bill Walters, Ward 
Lester, Art Bishop, Burton Pad- 
dock, Bill Hillhouse, Loren Chaney, 
Pat Patterson, Howard James, and 
Clark Schnurr. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Sackett, 

from Fort Collins, visited their 

daughter, Marianna, Saturday, Oc- 
tober 12. 

Miss Fredda Wootton entertained 
her sister-in-law, Mrs. S. Wootton, 
and her nieces, Ruth Joy and 
Ethel Mae, of Pueblo, October 12 
and 13. 



Elizabeth Hayden, Bemis Hall, 
had as guests during the week-end 
her mother, Mrs. M. H. Hayden, 
Breckenridge, Colo., and A'ma 
Owens and Eva Anderson of Fort 
Collins. 



Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Kruse and 
their son, Gleason, of Kiowa, Colo- 
rado, were in Colorado Springs 
Saturday, October 12, to visit their 
daughter, Mildred, at McGregor 
Hall. 



The Minerva pledges were guests 
of honor at a dance held at t h e 
club house, Friday evening, Octo- 
ber II. Mrs. C. A. Hibbard and 
Mrs. A. G. Sharp chaperoned the 
affair. The Minerva pledges are 
Alyce Ireland, Marian Weinberger. 
Mary Gallagher, Velma Rose, Gar- 
land Prather, Sonia Benderoff. 
Betty Landsdown, Frances Willis, 
r.nd Martha Catherine Sharer. The 
guests were Harold Harmon, Field 
Bohart, Phelps Dodge, Gilbert 
Rice, Albert Cuzonne. Mark Per- 
kinson. Marion Russell. Jim 
Thompson, Chauncey Blodgett, Tex 
Ferris, Jack Denney, Selby Young, 
Marks Jaillete, Jerry Cogan, Har- 
old Weaver. Charles Wilgus. Arthur 
Baylis. Carl Burke. Roland Ander- 
son. Lrwson Sumner. Walter Fors- 
lund. Winthrop Crouch. Bill Fnles. 
Bill Truby. rnd Milton Sprenger. 



HOLLY SUGAR 

is 
the Best 

Sugar the essential food. 

HOLLY SUGAR 
CORPORATION 



Quality 

Cleaners and Dyers 

SUITS, O'COATS 

HATS $1.25 

U-Fone 1-8-1-1 We'll Call 

H. A. Thompson 
10 E. Kiowa 



j DUTCH 

? for touchdowns and DUTCH 

i (Hammond) for new driver- 

I less cars. 

I New Fords 7c per mile; 

t 30c per hour. 

I New Cheve Six's 8c per mile; 

i 35c per hour. 

I Office 

ELK HOTEL 

Phones M. 346 and 2065 
Free Delivery 



WHY NOT 

Learn Typewriting 
while attending Col- 
lege? Your teachers 
will appreciate type- 
written work to be 
checked. We can ar- 
range hours to suit 
your convenience. 






THE TIGER 



Anthropology Is New 
Course This Semester 



An announcement has been made 
that a new course, deaHng with An- 
thropology and Archaeology, will 
be offered this year in the regular 
curriculum. Dr. W. Lewis Abbot 
will have charge of the new subject 
and will be assisted by Mr. W. W. 
Postlethwaite and several visiting 
lecturers. Dr. Abbott has an- 
nounced that the course will be 
open to sophomores and will give 
three hours credit each semester. 

With special reference to the 
American Southwest, t h e subjects 
studied in the first semester will 
consist of the origin of the races, 
the evolution of man, and the cul- 
ture of pre-ihistoric peoples. 

Continuing the second semester, 
the course will deal with the an- 
thropology of the American South- 
west and the samatology of the peo- 
ples, architecture, pottery, designs, 
crafts, and social institutions of that 
section. 

All phases of the subject will be 
illustrated by museum specimens 
and lantern slides will be shown 
from time to time to make the 
course more interesting. 



"Open him up again," said the 
surgeon to his assistant, as he re- 
turned hurriedly to the operating 
room. "I just found out this fel- 
low is a humorist and I forgot to 
leave a sponge inside." 



SOCIAL CALENDAR 1929-30 
FOR FIRST SEMESTER 




Plays a 
Smart Game 

a Phenom when it comes to 
blockmg out chilly winds. 

It's the Emesco Knitted 
"All-Occasion" Topcoat. Nev- 
er takes time out in any kind 
of weather. 

Emesco Knit 

Topcoat 

$30 

"Trade with the Boys" 
Pikes Peak at Nevada 



Friday, October 25— 

Student Government Costume 
Dance. 
Saturday, October 26 — 

Kappa Sigma party. 

Contemporary Honorary Tea 

Crescent Club Dance. 

Zetalethian Pledge Dance. 
Friday, November 1 — 

Town Girl's Dinner. 
Friday, November 8 — 

Hypatia Tea for Societies. 
Saturday, November 9 — 

Society Homecoming Breakfast 

Contemporary Tea. 

Kosihare Play. 
Thursday, November 14 — 

Contemporary Birthday Dinner. 
Friday, November 15 — 

Phi Delta Theta Dance. 

Minerva Dance. 
Saturday, November 16 — 

Phi Gamma Delta Dance. 

Contemporary Dance. 
Friday, November 22 — 

Beta Theta Pi Dance. 

Delta Alpha Phi Dance. 
Saturday, November 23 — 

Glee Club Concert. 
Wednesday, November 27 — 

Sigma Chi Dance. 
Thursday, November 28 — 

Kappa Sigma Breakfast Dance. 
Friday, December 6 — 

Minerva Party. 
Saturday, December 7 — 

Hypatia Party. 

Zetalethian Christmas Party. 
Friday, December 13 — 

Phi Delta Theta Dance. 

Kappa Sigma Dance. 

Phi Gamma Delta Dance. 
Saturday, December 14 — 

Pi Kappa Alpha Dance. 

Contemporary Christmas Dance. 
Tuesday, December 17 — 

Beta Theta Pi Christmas Formal 
Dance. 
Friday, January 10 — 

Sigma Chi Apache Dance. 
Saturday, January 11 — 

Exclamation Club Dance. 

The president of chairman of 
each organization giving a dance 
or bridge (social function) at a 
fraternity house, society house or 
public hall must notify the dean of 
women of the chaperones at least 
four days before the scheduled 
part is to take place. 



ORDER 

"SALLY ANN" 

CAKES AND CANDIES 

223 E. Yampa Main 1547-W 



One Society Dance Lacks Punch 
As Other Is Crashing Succesi 

By Heminway 
Something must be done. Yes, for this wave of crime which has 
threatened other parts of our nation has at last come home to us. We 
must make a strong effort to combat this lawlessness and cunning des' 
perateness. 

All of you have doubtless read of the conditions existnig today ir 
New York City, Chicago, and Her- 
rin. 111. Due to a laxity of t h e 
forces of the law or an inability on 
their part to cope with the situation, 
crime has burst all bounds of moral 
restriction and established a rule 
of its own in these places. This, in 
itself, shows the necessity of quick 
action in the suppression of a n y 
breaches of the social code. There- 
fore I say, there is a well defined 
need for protection for the interests 
of Colorado College. 

What, haven't you heard of these 
outrages of which I speak? Hasn't 
your paper printed it? Well that 
just goes to show how powerful and 
influential these opposmg forces 
are. But I'll give you the lowdown 
on this. 

Last Friday night was one of the 
most hectic in the history of Colo- 
rado College. I chanced to be on 
the scene of the disorders and 
folks it was just awful. As it hap- 
pened my honey invited me to her 
society hop. However as she is an 
officer we must needs go first to 
one of her sister society dances also 
held that night. Sort of a Ramsey 
McDonald mission so to speak. 

We got there and danced once 
or twice when all of a sudden there 
was a noise outside and the high- 
jackers were upon us. Not liquor 
highjackers but girl lifters. Of 
course the men of the party put up 
a valiant struggle but were over- 
powered. Then these gangmen 
proceeded to dance with all the 
dates. What were we to do but 
dance likewise. 

After a while my sugc.r and 1 
managed to escape and hurried to 
her own stronghold to spend a less 
riotous evening there. As we fled 
slowly through the Jungle I asked 
if she didn't think it a narrow es- 
cape. It burned me up when she 
replied that she thought it was 
quite a lot of fun to dance with 
the mutineers. I retorted that I 
didn't see it in that light where- 
upon she cracked wise about my 
dancing wth so many of the girls 
and that I didn't look a bit bored. 



The College Inn 

will be open at 6 A. M. Saturday Morning, 
eat Here before starting for Denver. 



Well, as the driller said, finall) 
we arrived at the other jig anc 
started all over again. After three 
or four hot dances we felt the neec 
of refreshment. But then came the 
blow which climaxed the evening 
Someone had taken the punch anc 
quietly departed. We all just sal 
right down and wept, and vowec 
that if ever we found the thieve; 
we would take their lives (anc 
also the punch). But try as we 
might we could find not a clue. Ii 
was, from that time on, a dry af- 
fair. 

No mercy should be shown sucf 
—(What? — Take that containei 
and hide it in the barn). — INc 
mercy should be shown su — 
(There's some left in it? I'll be 
there in a moment). — No mercj 
should be shown such vandals bu 
if they are ever caught it shoulc 
go hard with them. — (Its hard al 
ready? Oh I wasn't talking to you 
— But let's drink it anyway). — 
Please excuse me a moment folk 
but one of my fraternity brother 
just .happened on something un 
expected. I'll be right back. 



AMERICA 



SUNDAY FOR 4 DAYS 



n 



JiSTICt >^ 

11-//// ^sf 




THE TIGER 



SPORTS 



Tigers Defeat Aggies 
In Hard Fought Game 

By Chauncy H. Blodgett, Jr. 

Led by almost perfect inter- 
ference, with a pair of speed merch- 
ants in the backfield, Dutch Clark 
and his teammates on the tawney 
eleven, defeated the Colorado Ag- 
gies by a one point margin, 14-13, 
last week. After four years of dis- 
appointment. Coach Bully Van de 
Graaff saw his product come off 
the grid with the heavy end of the 
score — the first time that they had 
defeated the farmers since 1924. 

The flying Dutchman was the 
feature of the game with his bril- 
liant end runs, dead shot passes, 
c.nd heady generalship. Bus Day, of 
the up-state eleven was the thorn in 
the Tigers' side, getting away for 
substantial gains, especially in the 
second half, and appearing to be 
every place on the field at once. 

Under the name of Clark, the 
name Jones appears in capital let- 
ters. When called on to take the 
oval thru the line, the new recruit 
for the eleven did it-whether there 
was a hole there or not. He could 
be banked consistently for gains of 
from two to ten yards, and headed 
the interference for Clark, along 
with Hinkly. 

Hinkly made the first score pos- 
sible when he cleared a path for 
Ingraham, who snagged one of 
Clark's passes, and got away for 55 
yards and the first counter. 

Dutch scored the other touch- 
down early m the second heat, 
running around an end, after the 
eleven had marched up the field 
from an Aggie punt out. 

The line proved to be a threat for 
any team in the conference when 
they outcharged the Aggies in prac- 
tically all instances. 

Without Day, the Aggies would 
have been in a bad hole. He was 
their big threat, and led the attack 
with the aid of his three teammates 
Ball, Freauff, and Vaughn. Beat- 
tie, one of their big threats was 
evidently bothered by his game leg, 
but nevertheless managed to snag 
some passes for good gains, and 
bother the Tigermen with his de- 
fensive play. 

The Aggies kept up their des- 
perate rally until the last few min- 
utes of play, and the game was safe 
only when Clark intercepted a 
Farmer pass, and gave the Tigers 
an opportunity to hold the ball un- 
til the final gun. 



INTERFRATERNITY SPORTS 



There will be an important meet- 
ing of the Inter-Society Council on 
Tuesday, October 22, at 3:30 P. M. 
in Bemis. 



(Continued on page 3) 

I & 2 of first round vs. losers 

3 & 4 of first round. 
Friday, October 25, (tennis and 
horseshoe Singles) 

Losers of 5 & 6 vs. losers of 

7 & 8. 
Saturday, October 26 

Final consolation tournament. 
Points are divided accordingly: 

Winner of Doubles, 500 points. 

Winner of Singles, 500 points. 

Runner up of Doubles, 300 

poinas. 

Runner up of Singles, 300 

points. 
Consolation tournament: 

Winner of Doubles 200 points. 

Winner of Singles 200 points. 
Rules: 

1 . The team failing to appear 
within twenty minutes of scheduled 
time forfeits to the team ready to 
play. 

2. No letter men eligible. 

3. A single man may play 
doubles. 

4. One man cannot enter both 
horseshoes and tennis tournament. 

5. First two rounds will be best 
two out of three sets of games 
three out of five. 

6. No fighting on the courts. 



C. C.-DENVER GAME 



(Continued from page 3) 

state said this week that the Pione- 
ers played the type of ball that the 
game required, had a passing at- 
tack that was perfection itself, and 
gave perfect interference when run- 
ning back punts. 

With a recommendation like that 
from one who knows his football, it 
is not hard to see that the game 
Saturday is going to be a much 
tougher assignment than fans have 
thought. 

A block of seats is the west 
stands have been reserved for C. 
C. fans that are going to make the 
trip. 500 seats have been set aside 
for the Tiger followers, and are on 
sale at the Colorado Sporting 
Goods. 



HOMECOMING CHAIRMAN CHOSEN 



Richard Vanderhoof was chosen general chairman for Homecom- 
ing, at a meeting of the Associated Students Wednesday afternoon. This 
places the responsibility for a successful reunion 
very largely on his shoulders. His past record, 
however, demonstrates that he will entertain more 
alumni in bigger and better ways than ever has 
been done before. "Doc" staged the All-College 
mixer in Cossitt last month, enabling the freshmen 
and older students of the institution to get ac- 
quainted. During his days at the Colorado Springs 
high school he was manager of King Terror Day 
and Brown and White Day. Last year he was in 
charge of the Sophomore Barbecue. He is a mem- 
ber of Phi Gamma Delta. 

Appointments of the various committee chairmen was announced 
by Vanderhoof this morning. These six persons will work under Dick's 
direction, but will be independently responsible for their performance. 
Those named are Glenn Wade in charge of Enthusiasm, Margaret Pre- 
witt handling program; Trell Nowells as HospitaHty chairman; Duke 
Tucker, managing the parade; Ellsworth Richards as publicity director; 
Lorna Dorlac and Lois Seebach are co-chairmen of Decoration. 




Vanderhoof 



A SERVICE 
for Every Purse 



THE 
PEARL LAUNDRY 



EAT 'EM UP TIGERS 

Then come down and eat 
that tasty 
Confection 

AL'S FRENCH 
FRIED POPCORN 

114 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 



%OjdWadt 



TENT £: AWNING CO 



Awnings and Camp Suppli 



HERE'S THE HOSE 

THE FAVORITE OF AMERICA 
THE INSPIRATION O F PARIS 
THE CREATION O F KAYSER 



Kdyser 

"Slendo" Heel 

Hose 

There never vi^as a 
heel in a hose that 
enjoys the popular- 
ity o f "Slendo." 
147X is the popu- 
lar Kayser hose. The 
pure thread silk 
gives plenty of wear. 
Silk to the top. 
A Classroom 
Necessity. 



$1.^0 




~f<(U^ 



NOTICE 

6 College Girls 
wanted to assist 
in Fashion Show. 



We Giy* iJj*/.' Green Discount Stamps 



. italHwi In Our Oom uta r t Otfi* 



10 



THE TIGER 



HUGHES' 
CHOCOLATES 



Try our Saturday 
SPECIALS 




THE 

WHITE WAY 

SYSTEM 

Open Until 2 A. M. 

Try our delicious White 
Way Chili 

Snappy Curb S^rice 

1 1 N. Tejon St. 



Broken Lenses Duplicated 

Save the Pieces 

Eyes examined Lenses Ground 




THE LAUTERMAN-DUGAN 

JEWELRY AND OPTICAL CO. 

Jewelers, Optometrists and 

Mfg. Opticians 

Fine Watch, Clock and Jewehy 

Repairing 
121 N. Tejon St. Rhone Main 674 



LOOK YOUR BEST 

Have your hair cut in the 
approved manner. 

Pete's Barber Shop 

8 E. Cucharras St. 

PAUDRE-PAUFFE 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Permanent Finger and Water 

Waving 

Manicure and Scalp Treatments. 

Marcels 50c. 



Services for your 
car that includes 

Proper Lubrication 
100% Alenute 

LEADING MOTOR OILS 
Weaver ized Washing 

Tire Repairing Road Service 

Drive in Today 



FIRESTONE TIRES 
117 N. Nevada Phone M. 202 



og^/p 



McGregor hall guests 

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Ward, Jim 
and Mary Ann Ward, of Monte 
Vista, and Mrs. Russel Ward and 
Mary Dorcas, from Del Norte, 
Colorado, visited Miss Frances 
Ward at McGregor Hall, Saturday 
and Sunday, October 12 and 13. 

Mrs. Lemuel Pitts, Pueblo, Colo- 
rado, spent Saturday, October 12, 
with her daughter, Mary Elizabeth, 
at McGregor Hall. 

Miss Helen .Hummel was visited 
by her father, Mr. R. C. Hummel, 
and her sister, Kathryn, of Monte 
Vista, October 12 and 13. 

Dorothy Shultz of Pueblo vis- 
ited at Bemis Hall, last week-end. 
Miss Shultz attended Colorado col- 
lege during the last two years. 

Virginia Graham had as her 
guest last week-end, her sister, Sar- 
ah Graham, a student at the State 
Agricultural college in Fort Col- 
lins. 

Grace Gridley Wilm very kindly 
presented on the pianoforte, at the 
Coffee Hour, on Sunday, October 
13, the following program: 

Sonata Scarlatti 

Gavotte Gluck 

Andante in F Beethoven 

Three Preludes Chopin 

Polonaise in C Sharp Minor..Chopin 

Miss Marjorie Gilmore has been 
pledged to the Alpha Gamma Del- 
ta sorority at the University of 
Kansas. Miss Gilmore attended 
Colorado College for the past two 
years. 

Miss Alma Owens and Miss Eva 
Agricultural College in Ft. Collins 
were the guests of Miss Elizabeth 
Hayden over the week end. 

Aunt Kate, the Fiji house mother 
is rapidly recovering from the 
sprained arm which she received 
during their last dance. 



Wear a Tiger "Woolie" and "Mum' 
to the Game. 




30 N. Tejon 



Phone M. 214 



IN PRAISE OF OUR BAND 



By Marjorie Ferguson 

For the past two years there has 
been nothing but crabbing about 
the band. In every "cat" or "bull" 
session the band has been brought 
up for it's share of hard knocks. 
Everybody, including most of the 
faculty and all of the students have 
been of the opinion that things have 
come to a pretty bad pass when 
a college C. C.'s size can not even 
get up a decent band. Every one 
has been terribly disgusted because 
we have had to call on the local 
High School when music has been 
needed. 

But all of this is behind us. What 
about this year? What about the 
fine black and gold musical parade 
Saturday? Certainly we do not lack 
talent, for these men had only had 
time for two or three short practice 
periods. We are going to be rather 
poor sports if we start crabbing and 
criticizing this group of boys who 
are doing this for our College. Any 
organization is going to become dis- 
couraged and incidentally defunct 
if the people it depends on most for 
support constantly pick it to pieces 
just for past time. 

I think it is up to the student 
body to get behind the band in the 
same manner it does it's football 
team if it would have personal 
honor and glory fall on it's College. 
With a little encouragement it ought 
to become an up and going organ- 
ization. Let it play at our pep 
meetings and student assemblies in- 
stead of calling in out-siders. Show 
it we are all for it. Men will want 
to belong to it. They shall not be 
doing it for pledge duty; they shall 
be doing it for C. C. 

Besides mere praise the band 
ought to be. given some sort of rec- 
ompense for it's loyalty to the Col- 
lege. The men give up a great 
deal of time to practice. They put 
in many more hours of hard work 
than most of us realize. They 
ought to be given some sort of hon- 
orary key for three years' service 
in the band, or they ought to be 
given one hour's credit for each 
year in the band as some Colleges 
give for this service. This would 
serve as an incentive to keep the 
right kind of men in the band, for 
certainly they ought not to be 
asked to do so much for nothing. 

Let's get behind our band, Tig- 
ers, and show them we are all for 
them and that we like their music. 
Let's show them we are ready to 
support them rnd help them to 
have the finest year they have ever 
had. For in the end it means fame 
and glory for Colorado College if 
we have a fine band to go with 
our mighty football team and high 
ideals and traditions. 




?fe 



Drive It Yourself; 



SYSTEM 



Fords — Desotos — Chryslers 

D- C. HUTCHINGS, Mgr. 

Phone Main 1800 

21 No. Cascade 



PLAZA HOTEL BEAUTY SHOP 

Finger wave — Mcircels 

Permanent Waves 

Phone Main 2515 



BUICK MOTOR CARS 



Strang's 



Harry D. MacDonald 
President 



THE J. S. BROWN 

MERCANTILE 

COMPANY 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



Made in Colorado Springs 

VAN BRIGLE 
ART POTTERY 

The world's most famous 
art pottery. 

Visitors always welcome. 



Rhone Main 1710 

IDEAL 

A CLEANERS 

5 West Colorado Ave. 



Valetor Pressing Service 



THE TIGER 



11 



When you consider that you 
can purchase any make t]rpe- 
writer on monthly payments 
as small as $5.00 it is not a 
question of affording it 

The essential question is if 
you can afford to be without 



x^ 




125 N. Tejon 



Main 95 



The Ice Cream 
that's a C. C. 
"Institution" 

The between Class "Cones", 
I h e sandwich materials and 
candy, the ice creams and ices 
for class and club functions. 

From Frosh to Grad it's t h e 
place every Tiger knows. 

MOWRY'S 

Across from Campus 

Main 1183, 1184 



SUPERIOR 

Dry Cleaning Co. 

Telephone 1364 129 N. Tejon 




Here's Your 

VICTOR RECORD 

Come in and hear the latest releases 
in our ventialted trial rooms. . 

Headquarters for RADIO ^^-^ | 

VICTOR, MAJESTIC, FREED- OfOPHo^Cl 
ATWATER KENT^ AND^CROSLEY ^.'rJIiVrE ^?. 



Write your friends on 

Crested 
Stationery 

Murray's have a complete line of station- 
ery with the Crest of your Fraternity or of 
the College. 

TheM^RRAY 

Drug Co. 

I Across from the Campus 
.■■.-.„.„....-.->.>.>....>.>.>^.^.-.-«-..^. 



Called For — Delivered — Laundered — 
and Ready to Use 

SHEETS 7 cents 

BATH TOWELS 2 cents 

NAPKINS 1 cent 

The Elite Way 

IS the Most Economical 

PHONE MAIN 82 

'^^ LAUNDRY and 
DRY CLEANING 




Subscribe NOW for the 



TODAY'S NEWS TODAY' 



GAZETTE-TELEGRAPH 

Morning — Evening — Sunday All The News All The Time 



Daily Only 
55c per month 



Combination 
$1.30 per month 



Daily and Sunday 
73c per month 



ELECTROL OIL BURNERS 
Plumbing Heating 



312 N. 
Custer 



JTarcjine.. , 



Phone 
Main 
1674 



BUILDING supplies of course include at the same time every- 
thing used in repairs, improvements, etc., with Mill Work 
of the highest class workmanship. 

CRISSEY-FOWLER 

LUMBER COMPANY 



117 W. Vennijo 



Main 101 



Phone Main 4671 



831 North Tejon 



A. L. STARK 

TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 

COLORADO SPRINGS 



12 



THE TIGER 





Violet Rays of Sunshine 

not ''artificial treatment'' — make Old Gold 
. . . a better and a smoother cigarette 



OLD GOLD brought about a great change in smoking 
habits. It gave smokers a new freedom of enjoyment 
. . . without any forbidden limits. 

Thefman who used to say "I can't smoke until after 
lunch . . . my throat is sensitive in the morning'* 
now finds that he can "light up" whenever he pleases. 
For his morning OLD GOLD has no more throat- 
scratch than his breakfast omelet. 

Likewise all those who have to guard their throats . . . 
salesmen, singers, actors, and the like ... no longer 



have to stint their smokes, for OLD GOLD is as free 
of throat irritants as a glass of spring water. 

Better tobaccos did it . . . naturally good tobaccos . . . 
extra-prime leaf made irritation-free by the violet 
rays of sunshine . . . not by "artificial treatment." 

If you like food that is naturally good, instead of 
food made good by "artificial treatment" . . . you're 
sure to prefer old GOLD'S natural tobacco smooth- 
ness. Try a package . . . and get a vote of thanks 
from both your throat and taste. 



© p. LorilUrd Co., Est. 1760 

JVlother JNature makes them smoother and better . . . with "not a cough in a carload" 

On your Radio, OLD GOLD— PAUL WHITEMAN HOUR. Paul Whlteman, with his complete orchestra, every Tuesday, 9 to 10 P. M., Eastern Standard Time 



The Colorado Planing 
Mill Co. 

MILL WORK OF ALL 
DESCRIPTIONS 

PADDLES 
Frank Mitchell, Manager 

Phone 2876.W 
525 W. Colorado Ave. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



11 



OWARD'S 
BARBER 
SHOP 



19 East Bijou Street 



Photographs of our Colorado 
mountains. Nicely made — 
attractively colored by hand. 
Moderate in price — framed 
or unframed. 

H. L. STANDLEY 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs 



CADILLAC 

and 

CHRYSLER 

MOTORCARS 

■ Adams Motor Co. 

Marksheffel Building 



4. 










Ob€ Colorado College ^^ 

mmmm 

Official Students Publication 

VOLUME XXXII Number 6 








THE JVNQLE BECKONS 











ONE OF THE MANY BY-WAYS 
(See page 3) 



iC J3^C J 



;.?^i 







Office of Publication: 23 West Colorado Ave, Colorado Sprines, Colo. 



October 25. 1929 



THE TIGER 



"FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE" 

We Dry Clean 

Ladies' ^^-^ "Phone US first 

Dresses 
Furs 
Gloves 
Hats 
Scarfs 
Etc. 

M. 2958 




Gents' 
Hats 

Topcoats 
Tuxedos 
Gloves 
Ties 

Sweaters 
Etc. 



PhoBe Main 4671 831 North Tejon 

A. L. STARK 

TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 

COLORADO SPRINGS 




^JMissed! 



An end run, good interference, a high-step- 
ping, elusive back — a missed tackle, he's clear 
— an open field, touchdown! 

Crisp October football days hold your inter- 
est now. If you're from out of town, perhaps 
you missed writing your weekly letter home. 
Telephone instead — it's quicker and costs but 
little. Reverse the charges if you like. Arrange 
with your family to call each week. 

Ask Our Local Manager for Rates on Calls by 
Number 



The Mountain States 
Telephone & Telegraph Co. 



PlGGlYkWlGCLY 



fe: 



ALL OVER THE WORLD 

FIVE BUSY STORES IN 

COLORADO SPRINGS 



Called For — Delivered — Laundered — 
and Ready to Use 

SHEETS 7 cents 

BATH TOWELS 2 cents 

NAPKINS 1 cent 

The Elite Way 

IS the Most Economical 

PHONE MAIN 82 

'^^ LAUNDRY and 
DRY CLEANING 




A New Vogue 

In Footwear 




This very fash- 
ionable Plaza 
Tie in the "Walk- 
Over" line. 

$10 



Black Mat Kid with black lizard inlay. 

Brown Kid with Brown Lizard Inlay 

Main Spring Arch 

The Wanda 
Strap Pump, wilt 
sole, contrasting 
colors 

$10 

Autumn Brown Calf, Brown Lizard Trim. 

Patent Calf, Black Lizard trim. 

Black Kid, Black Lizard trim. 

Mode Tan Calf, Brown Lizard trim. 

Main Spring Arch 

toeCb. 




^^/r^%"ofj'^ 



no So. Tejon St. 



V 



Issued Friday of each week. Entered at the Post Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter 



VOLUME XXXII 



gkMFd TieBR 



Colorado College Weekly News Magazine 



Number 6 



WYOMING TO PLAY 
FROSH TOMORROW 



Students Admitted For Two-Bits 

On Presentation Of 

Student Pass 



Tomorrow the C. C. yearlings 
play their last home game of the 
season. To Tigertown, Wyoming 
U. is sending their freshman team, 
fresh from a 20-0 victory over the 
strong Fort Russell warriors. 

Some forty men are still fight- 
ing for their positions, and such a 
squad means a good team. Coaches 
Vandenberg and Rossener an- 
nounce no line-up for Saturday, 
but they state that between twen- 
ty-five and thirty men will see ac- 
tion. You will see many future Ti- 
ger men performing against Wyo- 
ming. The frosh have no list of 
stars, but rather a steady, hard hit- 
ting bunch with plenty of speed 
that is timed into team work. A 
great game is the least we can ex- 
pect. 

The game is called at 2:30. Be- 
tween the halves the cross-country 
run finishes; so there will be dou- 
ble enlertauiment for Tiger »^ iters. 

SOCIAL CREDITS ADDED 
BY A. W.S. FOR ACMES 



Recent changes in the constitu- 
tion of the inter-society council 
were announced at the A. W. S. 
legislative board meeting held Mon- 
day evening, October 21, in Bemis 
Hall. Reports of the activities 
committee, plans for the girls' or- 
chestra, the new A. S. C. C. con- 
stitution, publicity, and finances of 
the A. W. S. were also considered. 

Randalin Trippe!, president of 
the A. W. S. and of the inter-so- 
ciety council, announced that par- 
ticipation in any of the following 
activities will give a girl one-half 
social credit, according to recent 
decisions of the inter-society coun- 
cil: Mcibership in Koshare, Mem- 
bership in Eta Sigma Phi, commit- 
tees appointed by the A. W. S. or 
the A. S. C. C, membership on the 
legislative board of A. W. S., par- 
ticipation in the May Fete or Pan 
Pan. Ihese activities are added to 
the already existing list in the con- 
stitution of the inter-society coun- 
cil. 

Miss 1 rippel also explained t s e 
plan for the four inter-sociely leas 
to be held during November, De- 

(Contiiiued from puBe 9) 



Bortree Talks ^ 
On Health Fee 



At a meeting held sometime ago, 
the Trustees and Faculty of Colo- 
rado College decided to initiate a 
new health program, t 

Doctor Bortree, a prominent phy- 
sician of this city, will be in charge 
of the new work. His training alone 
was enough to warrant his selection. 
.An alumnus of Colorado College, 
Doctor Bortree finished his educa- 
tion al the Harvard Medical School. 
He is also a member of the Board 
of Trustees. 

As yet no definite policy has 
been announced by Doctor Bortree, 
but it is understood that the super- 
vision of the students' health is the 
uiderlying principle. Certain ex- 
aminations will be required period- 
ically of every student; strength 
tests will be be made; and steps 
will be taken to prevent the out- 
break of an epidemic. The living 
conditions in the various fraternity 
houses and halls will be investigat- 
ed, insuring the utmost sanitary 
quarters. 

In case of illness, the Health Fee 
includes medical care, but the 
Health Department hopes to pre- 
vent sickness as well. One life 
saved or the prevention of a serious 
epidemic would well be worth the 
nominal cost of the Health Fee. 

Too many students are prone to 
neglect the important matter of 
their health, 



JUNGLE TEMPTS STUDENT OUT 
OF DOORS THESE AUTUMN DAYS 

By Mark Perkinson 
You haven't seen anything if you've missed the Jungle for the past 
week and a half. Its just a painted fairyland, presenting a galaxy of 
hues to the startled senses. Delicately shaded reds blend with the yel- 
lowest of yellows. Green and brown grow side by side, parts of the 
same basic structure. The landscape is just a giant pallette with great 
blobs of color scattered at random on its surface. For in the fall Na- 
ture holds a grand pageant for all her people besides which, the greatest 
~ ~~~" works of man are trivial 

C. C. Graduate Is New 
D. U. Dean of Women 



Miss Gladys Bell, a graduate of 
Colorado College in the class of 
1919, is the new Dean of Women 
at Denver University. Miss Bell, 
who is considered young for such a 
responsible position, has just fin- 
ished an extended course at Colum- 
bia University. 

In an interview with Margaret 
Smith of The Rocky Mountain 
News, Miss Bell said in part: 

"A girl must realize she is a vi- 
tal part of a university, but yet it 
isn't up to her to run it. Thru her 
responsiveness, the modern co-ed 
develops a responsibility that makes 
her realize the necessity of shifting 
for herself and other. They see 
for themselves the necessity of a 
social democracy based on their 
own efforts. While the academic 
puisuit is the most important, the 
physical, social and mental relaxa- 
tion is quite as necessary in whole- 
soi.ie expressions." 



Special Train For Utah Aggie Game 

On November 2 the Colorado 
College grid team will go to Logan, 
Utah, on a special train for the 
football game with Utah Agricul- 
tural College. Fans desiring to at- 
tend this game s,hould see "Swede" 
Roark and make arrangements. 

A special fare of $22.56 has been 
offered for this trip as far as Og- 
den, Utah. The train will leave 
Colorado Springs at 5 o'clock 
Thursday, October 31, and will ar- 
rive in Salt Lake Friday noon. The 
Tiger special will leave Salt Lake 
at I :30 o'clock that afternoon, ar- 
riving in Ogden at 2:30 o'clock. 
The Tiger football squad and 
coaches will remain in Ogden over 
night, and take busses for Logan 
Saturday morning. 

Of course the Tiger special is de- 
pendent upon getting enough fans 



to make up a party. However, 
nearly enough applications have al- 
ready been made to assure the 
train. 

The return train will leave Og- 
den at 9 o'clock Saturday night, 
November 2, after the game, arriv- 
ing in Colorado Springs at 7 
o'clock Sunday night, November 3. 

Pullman fares are as follows: 
For double lower berth to accom- 
modate two persons, $15 round 
trip; double upper berth, $12 
round trip; drawing room to ac- 
commodate five persons, $54, and 
compartment to accommodate four 
persons, $42. 

Everyone who can make the trip 
is urged to do so, as it is easily 
worth the cost. Those who went 
last year are planning on going 
this year. 



man are trivial in 
parison. 

Could you be so foolish as to re- 
main indoors now when you might 
bs walking up a gravel path under- 
neath the bluest of blue skys, to 
who cares where? Or shuffling 
along through leaves in quest of 
new adventure? For maybe if 
you were to hunt just a little you 
would find where a stream came 
dashing down over a rocky ledge 
to fall, through radiant trees, into 
the margin of a little lake. And 
maybe there 'd be a stone bench by 
the waterfall where you might sit 
down and see the wild ducks as 
they feed among the rushes on the 
lake. And watch the flight come 
honking in from the evening for- 
age in the surrounding fields. 

Or maybe there's a hill that chal- 
lenges you, and from whose summit 
the front range lies in one vast 

(Continued on Page 9) 



INTRAMURAL CONTESTS 
APPROACH FINAL ROUNDS 



The intra-mural tennis and horse- 
shoe tournaments are rapidly ap- 
proaching the final rounds. In the 
tennis matches the doubles teams 
representing Phi Gamma Delta and 
Kappa Sigma have reached the fi- 
nals, and the singles play has 
reached the semi-final round. I n 
the barnyard golf tourney the sin- 
gles play has advanced to the semi- 
final bracket and the Independents 
will oppose the Kappa Sigs in the 
singles finals. 

The finals in all events will be 
played Saturday morning starting 
at 9 o'clock. The winner of each 
event will be awarded 500 points 
and the runnerup will earn 300 
points toward the trophy to be 
awarded by the Interfraternity 
council. 

Results: 

Tennis singles 

Pi Kappa Alpha represented by 
Owens won by default from the In- 

(Continucd on Pajie 9) 



THE TIGER 



New Constitution Submitted by Council For Ratification By Students 



The new constitution, which was 
printed in the last issue of the Tiger 
as well as in this, is the work of 
the committee which the council 
selected to carry on this work after 
a similar document failed in the 
election of last year. It is to be con- 
sidered in the next compulsory 
student assembly and, if passed by 
them, it will be sent to the faculty 
for ratification. The constitution 
will be read, section by section, its 
significance discussed and the floor 
will be open to any who wish to 
make remarks. Then a written vote 
will be taken on each section as it 
is read and those sections which re- 
ceive the necessary vote will be the 
constitution while those that fail 
will be presented at a later date in 
a revised form. 



CONSTITUTION AND REVISED 
CHARTER OF THE ASSOCI- 
ATED STUDENTS OF COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE 
Preamble — In order to effect a 
permanent organization and out- 
line a plan for the government for 
the students, we, the men and wom- 
en of Colorado College, adopt the 
following constitution : 
ARTICLE I — NAME AND MEM- 
BERSHIP— 
Sec. 1 — ^The name of this organ- 
ization shall be the Associated Stu- 
dents of Colorado College. 

Sec. 2 — All registered students 
in full academic standing shall be 
active members of this association. 
ARTICLE II— PURPOSE— 

The purpose of this association 
shall be to provide an effective 
means of communication between 
the undergraduate body and the 
college authorities, to exercise gen- 
eral supervision over student activ- 
ities, organizations, and customs, 
and to crystallize and activate the 
best of student opinions, doing all 
this for the good of Colorado Col- 
lege, 

ARTICLE III — THE STUDENT 
COUNCIL— 
Sec. I — The Associated Students 
of Colorado College shall be repre- 
sented by the Student Council, 
elected by popular ballot from 
among its members. 

Sec. 2 — The official membership 
of the Student Council shall con- 
sist of three Senior men, three Sen- 
ior women, two Junior men, two 
Junior women, one Sophomore 
man, one Sophomore woman, and 
one faculty member. 

Sec. 3 — Nominations — A com- 
mittee on nominations and elections 
shall be composed of the existing 
senior members of the Council, 
and they shall arrange for and con- 
duct annual nominations and elec- 
tions. 



Clause 1 — By April 15, of each 
year, the nominating committee 
shall publish a list of nominees in 
the Official Student Publication, 
such list to contain at least two 
nominees for each vacancy to be 
filled. 

Clause 2 — Following publication 
of the above list, other members of 
the Associated Students may be 
nominated by written petition, 
«igned by twenty qualified mem- 
bers of the Associated Students. 
Sec. 4 — Elections. 

Clause 1 — The Members of t h e 
Student Council shall be elected 
from the nominations submitted, by 
a secret balloting of the whole stu- 
dent body. 

Clause 2 — The time of elections 
ihall be the first week in May of 
each year. 

Clause 3 — A President, Vice- 
President, Secretary and Treasurer 
of the Student Council shall be 
chosen from among the Senior 
members, by the Student Council. 

Clause 4 — Vacancies in the 
Council shall be automatically 
filled by the candidate of the ap- 
oropriate group who received the 
text highest score in the previous 
election. 

Clause 5 — Recall of any member 
■•nay be effected by a majority 
vote in a special election called by 
the Student Council, on its own 
initiative, or upon receipt of a pe- 
tition bearing the signatures of 
fifty or more of the students. 

Sec. 5 — Organization and pro- 
cedure shall be left to the discre- 
tion of the Student Council, pro- 
vided that: 

Clause I — The President, Vice- 
President, Secretary and Treasurer 
shall constitute an executive com- 
mittee which shall be directly re- 
sponsible for the proper working 
of this constitution and such legis- 
lation as shall be enacted under it. 

Clause 2 — Permanent Officers 
and committees shall be established 
to carry on the business of the 
Council. 

Clause 3 — ^The legislation of all 
meetings of the Student Council 
shall be given official publication. 
Sec. 6 — Meetings — 

Clause 1 — The first meeting of 
the newly elected Council shall be 
held jointly with the retiring Coun- 
cil within one week after its elec- 
tion. 

Clause 2 — Regular meetings of 
the Student Council shall be held 
the first week of every month. 
These sessions shall be open to any 
student or faculty member unless 
special exception is taken by a two- 
thirds majority vote of the Coun- 
cil. 

Clause 3 — Special meetings of 



the Council may be called at the 
discretion of the President, or by 
petition of five members of the 
council. 

Sec. 6 — Powers and Duties — 

Clause 1 — The Student Coun- 
cil shall have the power to act for 
the Associated Students in legisla- 
tive, executive, and judicial matters 
pertaining to student affairs, which 
are not under the supervision of 
the college authorities, and not ex- 
pressly given to some other body. 

Clause 2 — ^The Student Council 
may enact temporary or permanent 
regulations appHcable to any and 
all student activities, not otherwise 
duly regulated. This clause shall 
be construed to mean that all leg- 
islation passed by the Council shall 
not be interferred with by the col- 
lege authorities, unless they be- 
lieve it to be endangering the wel- 
fare of Colorado College. 

Clause 3 — Administration of af- 
fairs shall be secured by the Stu- 
dent Council, the responsibility be- 
ing centralized in the executive 
committee. Persons may be en- 
listed from the faculty or Alumni 
as official or advisory members to 
serve on committees, etc. 

Clause 4 — The Student Council 
shall stand responsible for the ac- 
tions of the student body as a 
whole, toward the Faculty, the 
City, and toward other Institutions, 
and shall endeavor to maintain the 
best possible relations between it 
and other persons and organizat- 
tions. 

The Council may take reasonable 
measures to enforce proper conduct 
of the students, and may advise 
action on the part of the college 
authorities. 

The interpretation of this con- 
stitution is left to the Student 
Council. 

ARTICLE IV — INITIATIVE AND 
REFERENDUM— 

Sec. I — Referendum — Any 
action taken by the Council, or any 
actions proposed by it, but not car- 
ried out, judicial matters excepted, 
may be subjected to a vote of the 
Associated Students, whose decision 
shall be effective for the ensuing 
school year. Suoh vote may be re- 
quired by a petition signed by ten 
students, or by resolutions passed 
by two classes. It shall become ef- 
fective upon a favorable vote of a 
majority of the total members of 
the Associated Students. 

Sec. 2 — Initiative — A legis- 
lative measure shall become effec- 
tive if initiated by a petition bear- 
ing the names of ten students, and 
accepted by a majority vote in a 
special election. 
ARTICLE V— AMENDMENTS— 

Sec. I — Amendments to this 
Constitution may be proposed i n 



writing at any meeting of the Stu- 
dent Council by not less than IC 
students, or not less than 5 facult}! 
Tiembers, or they may originate 
within the Council itself. 

Sec. 2 — Such proposed amend- 
ments shall be discussed in the Stu- 
dent Council, which may act as a 
body of revision, and presented for 
discussion in a meeting of the Asso- 
ciated Students. It shall be given 
official publication at least once 
before a final vote is taken. 

Sec. 7 — The amendment shall 
become effective if accepted by a 
two-thirds majority of the students 
participating in a balloting held for 
the purpose, and by a favorcble 
vote of the faculty. 
SPECIAL ENACTMENT— 

Section I — This constitution 
shall be established upon ratifica- 
tion by a two-thirds majority vote 
of the Student Body, and a favor- 
able vote of the faculty. 

Section 2 — Upon ratification of 
this Constitution as provided above, 
it shall supersede the existing Con- 
stitution, and By-Laws of the As- 
sociated Students of Colorado Col- 
lege. 



'Better Equipped Than Ever 
To Handle College Trade " 



CAMPBELL'S 

BARBER SHOP 



109 East Pikes Peak Avenue 



T. J. Collier T. M. Collier 

V. L. Collier 

TheCOLLIER 

LUMBER CO. 

Phone Main 386 

543 W. Colorado Ave. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 



The Trip that Bankrupts the 
English Language 

CORLEY 

Mt. Highway 

Cripple Creek in high gear 



THE TIGER 



Grace Perkins 
Now President 
of Junior Class 

Ihe election of the officers of 
the lunior class was held in t h e 
Pit in Palmer Hall on Thursday 
moining. The meeting was called 
to Older by Harold Ingraham, and 
the nominations were made without 
difficulty. For president, Grace 
Perkins received 24 votes, and Lor- 
na Dorlac, 15. For vice-president, 
26 votes were cast for Charles Wil- 
gus, and 14 for J. Jacobs. Louise 
Wiley received 24 votes for secre- 
tary, and Lois Seeback, 17. For 
treasurer, 26 votes were cast for 
William Hinkley, and 15 for J. Ja- 
cobs. 



My Advice to College Boys: 
Stay in College. Ontside there is 
no place for a college man. — Will 
Rogers. 



-RIALTO— 

ALL WEEK 
STARTING 
SAT. OCT. 26TH 
"HOLLY- 
WOOD 
REVUE" 

with 

25 STARS 

and 

CHORUS OF 

200 

SINGING 

TALKINK 

DANCING 



— ♦ 

The Ice Cream 
that's a C. C. 
"Institution" 

The between Class "Cones", 
I h e sandwich materials an d 
candy, the ice creams and ices 
for class and club functions. 

From Frosh to Grad it's t h e 
place every Tiger knows. 

Movs^Ry's 

Across from Campus 

Main 1183. 1184 



HDLBERT WRITES ANOTHER 
CHAPTER OF SERIAL BOOK 



Professor Archer B. Hulbert's 
book "The Romance of American 
Rivers" running serially in NA- 
TIONAL WATERWAYS reached 
chapter ten in the August issue with 
the chapter "The Steamboat on 
Western Waters". The September 
number carried the chapter "Trans- 
portation as a Factor in the Growth 
of Chicago". The October number 
will be devoted to Centennial of 
the completion of Slack-Water 
Navigation on the Ohio River; the 
leading article will be the twelfth 
chapter of Mr. Hulbert's book; 
"The Ohio River: A course of 
Empire". 



•'You're Sure They're Pure" 

Pecan Cream Loaf 
at 35c lb. 

One of the old favor- 
ites — white cream-can- 
dy loaves in which pe- 
can meats are blended, 
then cut into slices. 
Feature for Saturday, 
the 26th. 



26 S. Tejon 



Dern's 



You may save with this Associa- 
tion, any amount from one dollai 
up per week or month. 

We invite college students to caL 
at our office (Ground floor loca- 
tion) 1 16 North Tejon Street, Colo 
rado Springs. 




E. C. SHAKt:.R, President 
1 16 North Tejon Street 



When you consider that yon 
can purchase any make tjrpe- 
writer on monthly paymenb 
as small as $5.00 it is not a 
question of affording it 

The essential question is if 
you can afford to be without 



/ U Typewriter 

(J/ Man 

125 N. Tejon Main 95 



Euterpe Society Holds 
First Meeting Of Year 

The Euterpe Musical Society met 
at the home of Dean Hale, 1302 N. 
Weber St. on Tuesday night, Octo- 
ber 1 5th, with 38 members and 
guests present. 

The Euterpe Musical Society is 
an organization for all students in 
the Colorado College School of 
Music and Dramatic Art. The meet- 
ings are held twice a month at the 
homes of the members and friends 
of the society. At each meeting, 
in addition to a program represent- 
ing the various departments. Dean 
Hale gives a lecture on some phase 
of music which will be interesting 
and (helpful to all. The officers for 
the year are: Florence Pickett, 
President; Dorothy Crews, Vice- 
President; Esther Stuewe, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer. 

The following program was giv- 
en Tuesday night: 
Piano — Arlequin - - Chaminade 

Billy Layton 
Reading — Her Good Day - Phelps 

Marian Ferril 
Voice — 

Slyvelin Sinding 

When the House is Asleep - 
Haigh 

Blackbird's Song - - - Scott 
Helen Huffman 

Accompanist — Mildred Hazlitt 
Violin — 

Nobody Knows De Trouble 
I've Seen - - - - White 

Madrigal - - - - Simonetti 
Rebecca Todd 

Accompanist — Dorothy Crews 

The following new members and 
and guests were present: Mrs. Fau- 
teaux, Mrs. Trevrorow, Ethel Bley 
Smith, Mildred Iliff, Marion Gret- 
zinger, Dorothy Underwood, Elinor 
McCleary, Jack Kintz, Margaret 
Woliver, La Cleta Shoemaker, Hel- 
en Thompson, Lois Frederick, 
Georgia Pickett, Rebecca Todd, 
Robert Speegle, and Alive Gillett. ] 

Mt. Manitou Scene 

Of First W. A. A. Hike 



Mrs. Morrows Elected To 
Job In National Group 

At a recent meeting of the Col- 
orado Wyoming Branch of the 
American Association of Collegiate 
Registrars, Mrs. J. R. Morrow, Reg- 
istrar of Colorado College, was 
elected Secretary Treasurer for the 
ensuing year. 



^Om^M 




TENT PAWNING CO 



Awnings and Camp Supplies 



Couture's 

French Cleaning and Dyeing Co. 

Phones 1288-1289 
218 N. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 



Go To 

Miller Music Cp. 

"Where Music Is Sweetest" 
13 North Tejon Street 
for Records and Music 

GEORGE L. MILLER, Prop. 




The first W. A. A. hike for this 
year was held Saturday morning, 
October 12, up Mt., Manitou, Hik- 
ing is open to all girls in the school 
who wish to earn W. A. A. points 
in this way, one point being given 
for each mile hiked. It also counts 
as one hour of gym credit, with 
the same requirements as other 
gymn classes. The hiking schedule 
for the remaining part of the semes- 
ter follows: 

October 26 — Seven Falls. 

November 2 — Waldo Canon. 

November 16— Mt. Cutler. 

December 7 — Red Rock Canon. 

December 14 — Garden of the 
Gods. 

January 4 — Point Sublime. 



Leather 
Jackets 

From the kick-off to the fi- 
nal gun nothing compares to 
Town and Country Leather 
Jackets f o r warmth and 
good looks. Soft leathers in 
Brown, Tan and Grey. 



$13.50 

and more 



"Trade with the Boys" 




Pikes Peak at Nevada 



THE TIGER 



Member of Rocky Mountain 

Inter-Colleeiate Press 

Association 




The Colorado CoUesrc 

Newspaper, 

Published Weekly by the 

Students. 



LLOYD H. ELLIS Main 1975 Editor 

Chauncey H. Blodgett, Jr Sport Editor Margaret Gillen Society Editor 

JAMES PATTERSON Main 2575 Manager 

Glenn F. Wade Head Newsboy 



Arttclea intended for publication should be left in the Tiger Box, on the first 
floor of Coburn library, by Wednesday noon. No unsigned contributions will be 
published. 



THE NEW CONSTITUTION. 

In this time of law violations through the weaknesses of our laws, 
it has been the custom of well meaning educators and some conscien- 
tious legislators to criticize the laws, statutes, and constitutions of both 
our national and state governments. There are too many laws and too 
many holes through which violators of the law may get by. In Colorado, 
a group composed of state senators, state representatives, and political 
science professors from Colorado schools including Colorado College, 
are attempting to revise the state constitution, and to give Colorado a 
new modern constitution which will fit the needs of the legislative bodies. 

It is, therefore, not out of place for the Colorado College students 
to join this reform movement, and rewrite a new constitution for the 
student body, revising old forms and articles, and giving the Associated 
Council, a constitution not bound by old provisions and numerous 
amendments. After much labor, a new constitution was drawn up last 
year and placed before the student body. Forgetting the true worth 
of the constitution by magnifying the probability of a woman president 
and equal representation of men and women, the students raised such 
a hubbub that only a bare majority voted for the constitution, and this 
was finally called void through a technicality. Tired of the fight, the 
council recommended to the new council that there be a new constitu- 
tion. Only a reminder of last year's results should be enough to the 
new council concerning the technicalities of submitting a new con- 
stitution. 

And now we have a new constitution submitted by this year's coun- 
cil. When one looks at the document, he at once notices its extreme 
brevity. All powers are given to the student council. Not one of the 
old amendments is listed. Will not the new council have to list these 
provisions sooner or later? Who will decide the membership of all 
committees, the appointment of the manager and editor of the Nugget, 
the length of their service? Will this not be listed? Government of a 
few is proper for a group who can not govern themselves, but to give 
a council unlimited powers over a supposedly educated group of col- 
lege students seems to be a farce. There is not a democracy in the 
world that does not have limited and listed powers, and certainly there 
should be some check on the Associated Student Council besides an 
initiative and referendum which has worked only partially in the United 
States. 



INTERFRATERNITY SPORTS. 

One of the criticisms of modern educators in regard to the present 
day college and its activities is the over emphasis of inter-collegiate 
athletics. It is too often the case that the play of numerous men in in- 
tramural sports is sacrificed for participation of a few men who repre- 
sent the college in conference contests. 

In one case, at Reed College, there are no inter-collegiate ath- 
letics. Instead, every man is expected to belong to some intramural 
team just as every Freshman and Sophomore at Colorado College is re- 
quired to take physical education. But a movement either to have only 
a football team and no athletics for the school at large or to have only 
intramural athletics may be carried too far. Any college student sees 
the great worth of inter-collegiate athletics. A good balance would 
be strong intramural sports and good inter-collegiate athletics. 

Inter-fraternity sports at Colorado College have taken on a new 
lease of life. In the past, there have been only basketball and baseball 
tournaments. This year, the inter-fraternity council has started an am- 
bitious intramural athletic program. Tennis matches and horseshoe 
matches have been played for the championship of the campus. Soon, 
a swimming meet is to be held. Later in the year, there wall be the 
basketball and baseball tournaments. Such contests should be devel- 
oped and held every year. The best way to answer critics of our col- 
lege system of athletics is to support the intramural athletics . The in- 
terfraternity council should be commended for its present activity. 



Are Modern Colleges Educating Us? 



Dr. E. C. Wilm has an article m 
The Nation, issue of October 9, en- 
titled, "The College and Main 
Street." The monograph when as- 
signed to me, was to be a review 
of that article. If I should stray to 
other current treatises please par- 
don my transgressions. 

But first I must concern myself 
with "The College and Main 
Street." I cannot read it without 
seeing back of the sheet, as it were, 
Mr. Wilm sitting there in his chair, 
legs crossed, talking to me. He is 
urging us, by the means of familiar 
examples and personal pleading, to 
study for learning's sake alone. 
How singular it is that we should be 
expected to learn for learning 
alone! Theoretically, I am his dis- 
ciple. This review, then, wall tenc^ 
to be favorable. 

Prof. Wilm suggests eight con- 
structive changes in college life. 
First, he says, "in planning a suc- 
cessful college stiffen considerably 
the entrance requirements, admit- 
ting only such students as are qual- 
ified in intelligence and purpose to 
profit from a thorough college 
training." Undoubtedly there are 
too many people going to college 
today that have no right to be 
there. How are we to weed them 
out? "The entire problem of ad- 
mission can best be handled," 
writes President Wilkins of Oberlin 
College, "by a college which has 
definitely limited the number of 
students it will receive." Its board 
of examiners will strive then to get 
the best of applicants, rather than 
take them all and hope for a thin- 
ning out process farther along the 
road. 

"Advance the salaries of profes- 
sors," Mr. Wilm continues, "to a 
point where they will attract men 



By Barratt O'Hara, II 



as able as any to be found in law, 
medicine, engineering, or invention. 
As a concrete bases, I suggest that 
a college of a thousand students 
should have on its staff at least ten 
men drawing a minimum salary of 
$12,000." Certainly, no teacher 
should receive as little as some of 
the assistants in our overgrown 
state institutions of higher learning 
do receive, and simultaneously be 
expected to give masterly instruc- 
tion. Aristotle, if I recall correct- 
ly, was of the opinion, however, 
^hat true philosophers and success- 
ful teachers were not dependent up- 
on monetary rewards. What effect 
modern civilization, with its insis- 
tent commercial demands, has upon 
tutorial salary I do not know. Per- 
haps twelve thousand is the proper 
mean. 

"Abolish intercollegiate athlec- 
ics," Dr. Wilm asks, "and foster 
intramural sports and games for all 
students," This, perhaps, is a 
bombshell to some. It is now au- 
tumn, the football season; may I 
quote from Earnest Hatch Wilkins, 
former dean at The University of 
Chicago: "Intercollegiate football 
is on trial . . . We are not greatly 
concerned today with the effect of 
football upon the men who play 
the game. Even for them it has its 
disadvantages, which should be les- 
sened; but for them it has also 
great advantages, which often do 
outweigh its disadvantages. But 
the men who play the game are but 
a tiny fraction — somewhere be- 
tween I and 2 per cent — of t h e 
total college population of the 
country. What happens to any 2 
per cent in their college training is, 
of course, important; but it is ob- 
viously far less important than what 

(Continued on page 8) 



DEATH 
CRITICAL NOTE: This anonymous poem, "DEIATH", may be 
loosely placed in the category of the imitative ballad, with a universal 
philosophical appeal. Its strict adherence to the conventional tends to 
give a bit too prosy a flavor. Let's leave the beaten track a little more 
the next time. — John W. Haussermann, Jr. 



Softly the shades of night drawn round 
The mighty chieftan's bier. 

No longer will his shouts resound. 
To strike the earthly ear. 

Once mightiest of all his band 

He now recumbent lies. 
His name still echos thru the land. 

To dry his mourners' eyes. 

Is death the end of valor then? 

Death the reward of fame? 
Or is it just a turning point 

To another kind of game? 



— ^Anonymous. 



THE TIGER 



W. I. Lucas 

HAS 

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SPORTING GOODS 
"Tigers always welcome" 

119 N. Tejon St. 
Main 900 



for hot, clean 
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Breakfast Luncheon 

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SOCIETY 



Delta Alpha Phi held a dance at 
the chapter house, Friday evening, 
October 18, in honor of their 
pledges, Richard Ellison, Edgar 
Gregory, John Langum, Donald 
Horton, W. M. Metzler, James 
Turner, Kenneth Peterson, and 
Henry Wershing. The guests were 
Irena Slane, Virginia Marbut, Mar- 
jorie Ferguson, Ruth Stevens, Cly- 
dette Higgenbottom, Mildred Arm- 
strong, Emmalou McBroom, Ruth 
Griffin, Virginia Freudenberger, 
Margaret ^issonnette, Marie Kemp, 
Kay Poland, Muriel Johnson, Es- 
telle Montgomery, Helen Mather, 
Doris Shoffner, Margaret Mather, 
Neva Walters, Norma Holmquest, 
Freda Mooton, Eleanor Barnhart, 
Elizabeth Stewart, Josephine Dic- 
kinson, James Dodson, Bennie Fil- 
ler, Jack Checknolvik, Dan Santry, 
and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Potter. 
The chaperons were Dean and Mrs. 
C. B. Hershey and Mr. and Mrs. 
Rae Hope. 

Exclamation club announces the 
pledging of Phyllis Ormsby, Mar- 
tha Herbert, Catherine Herbert, 
Jean Horan, Adda Smits, Mildred 
Strachan, Frances Willis, Myra 
Reinking, Alyce Ireland, Margaret 
Killian, Edith Blotz, Genevieve En- 
gel, Carol Edwards, Evelyn Stub- 
blefield. 

BEMIS COFFEE HOUR 

Miss Virginia Marbut and Mr. 
Gaetano Dennessi will furnish the 
music for the Coffee Hour at Be- 
mis on Sunday, October 27. 
Tenor — 

A Dream Bartlett 

My Arcady Strickland 

Gaetano Dennessi 
Piano — 

Melodic Rachmanioff 

Waltz Chopin 

Arkansas Traveler Guion 

Virginia Marbut 
Tenor — 

Consecration Manney 

I Hear You Calling Me, Marshall 
Gaetano Dennessi 

Twenty-two members of Phi 
Gamma Delta, social fraternity at 
the University of Colorado were 
placed under quarantine last night. 
Quarantine followed removal of 
Francis Beeler, law student, to the 
community hospital. Beeler was 
reported to have had diptheria but 
this later was denied. The exact 
nature of his illness was not an- 
nounced. 

Nine members of the fraternity, 
playing on the C. U. football team, 
were removed from the house Sun- 
day when Beeler first became ill, 
and therefore escaped the restric- 
tion now in force. 



Student Government, the organ- 
ization of dormitory women at 
Colorado college, will entertain all 
of the girls of the school at a party 
c.t Bemis Hall, tonight. The affair 
will be a "kid party." Eleanor 
Watts is in charge of arrangements. 

Announcement has been made of 
the marriage of Miss Mary Moore 
to Mr. Fred Hammer. Miss Moore 
attended Colorado College for the 
past three years and is a member 
of the Contemporary society. The 
wedding took place, Saturday, Oc- 
tober 19. Mr. and Mrs. Hammer 
will make their home at Woodland 
Park. 

The Zetalethian Society will hold 
an open house at their new home 
on Friday, October 25 between 
four and six o'clock. 

Helen Hummel has not been at- 
tending school the last few days. It 
is rumored that soon she shall 
make her appearance with a new 
pair of glasses. 

SHIEKS TAKE THEIR DATES 
TO ARABIAN TENT 

College men have big advantages 
in struggle to gain feminine approv- 
al. They take their dates to the 
New Arabian Room at the Cosmo- 
politan where charming oriental at- 
mosphere IS combined with unsur- 
passed music. 

Here with all the magic splendor 
of Aladdin's Palace is a huge ara- 
bian tent beautifully draped, softly 
lighted — a mirror-like floor. Atmos- 
phere to the nth degree. 

Dancing to the music of the 
"Seven Aces" Columbia Recording 
Artists and winners of the 1928 
Broadcasting Popularity contest 
coming direct to the Cocmopolitan 
from the Mulebach Hotel, Kansas 
City, Missouri, the Peabody Hotel, 
Memphis, Tennessee. 

Besides regular dances Friday 
and Saturday night the manage- 
ment announces luncheon dancing 
every day from 12:30 to 2 in the 
Cosmopolitan Dining Room and 
dmner dances every evening from 
7 to 10. 

The Saturday evening dance at 
the Broadmoor Hotel was attended 
by a large number of college peo- 
ple. Included in the number were 
Josephine Campbell, Marian Fee, 
Betty Fuller, Katherine Pollen, 
Alice Aaby. Dorothy Faus, Mary 
Gallagher, Betty Skidmore. Eva 
Crowder, and Max Keyle. Bob 
Doyle, Trell Nowels. Albert Gieske, 
George Robinson, DeWitt Tucker, 
Harold Ingraham, John Thurston, 
Ellon Slate, and Alvin Griffith. 



HOLLY SUGAR 

is 
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Sugar the essential food. 

HOLLY SUGAR 
CORPORATION 



Quality 

Cleaners and Dyers 

SUITS, O'COATS 

HATS $1.25 

U-Fone 1-8-1-1 We'll Call 

H. A. Thompson 
10 E. Kiowa 



DUTCH 

for touchdowns and DUTCH 
(Hammond) for new driver- 
less cars. 

New Fords 7c per mile; 
30c per hour. 

New Cheve Six's 8c per mile; 
35c per hour. 

Office 

ELK HOTEL 

Phones M. 346 and 2065 
Free Delivery 



WHY NOT 

Learn Typewriting 
while attending Col- 
lege? Your teachers 
will appreciate type- 
written work to be 
checked. We can ar- 
range hours to suit 
your convenience. 



^latr« 






THE TIGER 



DO MODERN COLLEGES 
TEND TOWARD CIVILIZATION 



(Continued from page 6) 

happens to the 98 per cent. And 
the new indictment against inter- 
collegiate football is precisely this, 
that intercollegiate football ... in- 
terferes seriously with the educa- 
tion of the 98 per cent." Commit- 
tee G of the American Association 
of University Professors finds that 
in its opinion intercollegiate foot- 
ball interferes to an intolerable de- 
gree with the attainment of the pur- 
pose of the American college. In 
tercollegiate athletics necessarily 
enforces the feeling that high 
school athletes are the most desir- 
able of all possible college fresh- 
men. And sportsmanship is a 
mockery when the students know 
that players on their teauns are be- 
ing financed. Perhaps the best so- 
lution has been advanced by Dr. 
Edgar Fauver, of Wesleyan Uni- 
versity. He suggests that no man 
should be allowed to engage in in- 
tercollegiate competition in a given 
sport for more than one year. 

"Abolish fraternities," continues 
Prof. Wilm, "allowing the social 
life of the institution to establish it- 
self on the natural basis of exis- 
tence outside the college walls." 
Fraternities, within the last five 
years, have done much to raise the 
scholastic average. On numerous 
campuses, fraternity averages have 
been higher than the non-fraternity 
figures. Davidson, within the last 
year, has forbidden fraternities to 
have houses, but feeling that there 
is something to be gained by t h e 
members in their society co-opera- 
tion, permits them to have a one 
room cabin, where they may repair 
several times a week. 

"Correlate the courses of 
study," Mr. Wilm suggests, "in a 
manner to avoid duplication, and 
to secure an orderly advance in 
knowledge and proficiency in the 
line of a self-chosen department of 
study. Reduce free election to a 
minimum." 

Don Gordon, in his article "Col- 
lege — Five Years Later," writes 
"Our first vain regret is that, 
though college gave us many 
things, it failed signally to corre- 
late them with each other and with 
the life we have to live. It cut all 
knowledge into segments and then 
forgot to put them together again. 
We beheld a series of unrelated 
fragments instead of a living force. 
Naturally the division of the world 
into comprehensible parts could not 
be avoided. Thus we learned his- 
tory and put that in one pigeon- 
hole. We studied economics and 
gave it a niohe. We followed the 
(Continued on page 9) 




THE TIGER 



DO MODERN COLLEGESQ 
TEND TOWARD CIVILIZATION 



(Continued from page 8) 

mysterious windings of philosophy 
and applied another label. Ethics 
was in the next tier. We were 
never informed that history and 
economics sometimes touched 
hands, even fused and became one 
upon occasion. There are some 
segments missing yet. These are 
accounted for by the fact that we 
were not judiciously guided and we 
were too indolent and too ignorant 
to be our own Virgils." 

"Abolish the traditional unit and 
marking system," he requests, 
"which diverts the students mind to 
an extraordinary degree from t h e 
matter of instruction itself, substi- 
tuting therefore final examinations 
to be held by examining boards, 
preferably from outside the college 
teaching body, all degrees and di- 
plomas to be awarded only on rec- 
ommendations of such boards." 

The modern college has been 
minutely dissected by the expert 
and by the layman. Neither has 
been backward in telling the world 
what he found, or even hesitant in 
whispering he thought he had 
found. No month passes without 
magazines featuring a college ex- 
pose. To me these articles, are ex- 
tremely interesting. Everyone 
should read Dr. Wilm's article. In 
addition I would suggest that you 
read two or three from the follow- 
ing list. They are all recent works, 
and may be obtained, I hope, at 
Coburn library. Let us keep in- 
formed of what the world thinks of 
us! 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 
E. Lyman, "Putting it up to the 
College," The Atlantic Monthly, 
November, 1929. 
Henry R. Carey, "Sterilizing t h e 
Fittest," North American Re- 
view, November, 1929. 




Janet Gaynor scores a 
speaking triumph i n 
her initial talking film 
role. 

AMERICA 

4 Days Starting 
SUNDAY, NOV. 27TH 



Phi Gams and Kappa Sigs 
Play Finals on Saturday 



(Continued from page 3) 

dependents. 

Murray playing for Phi Gamma 
defeated Grant, Phi Delta Theta, 
6-2, 6-3. 

Tennis doubles 

Blodgett and Brandborg, Kappa 
Sigma, won by default from t h e 
Jelta Alphs. 

Cogan and Murray, defeated 
Smith and Grant, Phi Delta Theta. 
6-2. 

Cogan and Murray, Phi Gam, de- 
leated Owens and McArthur, Pi 
vap, 6-1, 6-0. 

Horseshoe Doubles 

Phi Gam defeated Phi Delt. 

Kappa Sigma defeated Beta and 
independents won from the Phi 
Gams. 

Horseshoe Singles 

Phi Delta Theta defeated the In- 
iependents. 



"I Wish I'd Never Seen a College 

Campus," American Magazine, 

April, 1929. 

Meiklejohn, "Who Should Go To 

College," New Republic, January 

16, 1929. 
"What Profit Education," Survey, 

May 15, 1929. 
"Collegians in College", Outlook, 
^^ April 24, 1929. 
"Collegians in College," Outlook, 
^^ April 24, 1929. 
"Moral Confusion in the Colleges," 

Literary Digest, December 22, 

"Right to Dismiss a College Stu- 
dent," School and Society, July 

6, 1929. ^^ 

Hibbard, "Utopia College: a Pros- 
pectus," Outlook, February 27, 
1929. 

Davies, "What Colleges Might Be," 
The New Republic, June 5, 
1929. 

W. M. Proctor and E. J. Brown, 
"Is a Uniform Plan of College 
Admission either Feasible or De- 
sirable?" School Life, April, 
1929. 

C. C. Little, "Mass Production in 
the Colleges," New Republic, 
June 26, 1929. 

Don Gordon, "College — Five Years 
Later," North American Review, 
August, 1929. 

Ernest Hatch Wilkins, The Chang- 
ing College, Chicago, 1927. 

W. Beran Wolfe, "Why Educate 
Women?" Forum, March, 1929. 

Clarence C. Little, "Women and 
Higher Education," Scribner's, 
August, 1929. 

Mac McConn, "When is a Teacher 
Not a Teacher?," North Ameri- 
can Review, October. 1929. 

William Allan Neilson, "Should 
Women Be Educated Like 
Men?," Forum, February, 1929. 



A. W. S. Activities 



(Continued fi-om page 3) 

cember, January, and April. The 
teas will be sponsored by the four 
girls' scocieties, but will be for all 
girls in college who desire to at- 
tend. Speakers will be secured to 
make talks concerning different 
types of colleges. Definit announce- 
ments regarding the affairs will be 
made from time to time. 

Jo Hildrich, chairman of the ac- 
tivities committee, discussed the A. 
W. S. float for the Homecoming 
parade. Louis Hilswick is chair- 
man of the sub-committee which is 
working under the direction of the 
activities committee and making ar- 
rangements for the float. 

Evelyn Stubblefield, senior rep- 
resentative on the Student Govern- 
ment board, urged the members of 
the A. W. S. board to remind the 
girls in their respective groups that 
all of the girls of the college were 
invited to attend the costume party 
sponsored by S. G., to be held on 
Friday evening, October 25, in Be- 
mis Hall. 



Frank Geddy Says— 

Drop in and chat with me 
Tigers Always Welcome. I 

specialize in sole repairing 
and fine leather work. 

The Shoe Shop 

Across from the High School 
^ 



JUNGLE IS BEAUTIFUL 
IN THE AUTUMN SEASON 



(Continued from page 3) 

sweeping panorama before you. 
On the lower slopes of these moun- 
tains the forces of color are re- 
treating before the white host from 
the highlands. And surmounting 
all, the mightiest of the monarchs, 
Pikes Peak, looms majestic. And 
the wind is cold but you don't 
care, for your sweater is warm and 
your blood runs hot. And your 
hair's all windblown, and your 
cheeks burn, and your eyes sting, 
and you like it. For you're young 
and free, and the world is all right, 
and you like the people in it. 

That's life. It makes you feel 
that maybe after all you are a part 
of the Great System. For surely 
all these things about you are your 
friends. All this beauty is for your 
pleasure; Nature is kind to all. 
And as you turn homeward through 
the gathering dusk, amid gently 
falling showers of leaves, you feel 
a bond which draws you always in- 
to closer relationship with mankind. 
An intangible something which 
bears you up and inspires in you 
a new sense of comradship. 

When you walk in the jungle. 



ORDER 

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Finger wave — Marcels 

Permanent Waves 

Phone Main 2515 



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We believe that most students consider their work 
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possible working materials, especially when the useful- 
ness and satisfaction in them makes them cost no more. 

So we offer such good things as geunine Irving- 
Pitt Note Books and Filler, K. & E. Drawing Instru- 
ments and Supplies and other materials of equally good 
quality. 



DIES for the various frater- 
nity emblems are part of 
our stock so that we can die- 
stamp stationery, cards, an- 
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short notice. 



Printing Cr 
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Colonado Springs Cola 



10 



THE TIGER 




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Good tobaccos . . . made good by Nature, not by "artificial 
treatment," That's the secret of OLD GOLD'S goodness 



A chef may be able to make a doubtful steak 
taste good by artificial flavoring and sauces , , . 
But it's still dangerous to your stomach. 

So it is with cigarette tobaccos. "Heat-treat- 
ing" is useful to "set" and "sterilize" the to- 
baccos . . . and all cigarette makers have used it 
for years. But "heat-treating" cannot take the 
place of good tobacco in making a honey- 
smooth cigarette. 



OLD GOLD tobaccos are naturally good. Care- 
fully selected from Nature's best for smooth- 
ness, flavor and freedom from throat-scratch. 

You have only to try a package to get the thrill of 
this smoother and better cigarette. That vt^ill 
tell you why old gold's sales are ALREADY 
THREE TIMES GREATER than the combined 
sales of three leading brands during a like 
period of their existence. 



JSetter lobaccos make them smoother and better . . . with "not a cough in a carload** 

On your Radio. OLD GOLD— PAUL WHITEMAN HOUR. Paul Whiteman. with his complete orchestra, every Tuesday, 9 to 10 P. M., Eastern Standard Time 



The Colorado Planing 
Mill Co. 

MILL WORK OF ALL 
DESCRIPTIONS 

PADDLES 
Frank Mitchell, Manager 

Phone 2876-W 
525 W. Colorado Ave. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



n 



OWARD'S 

BARBER 
SHOP 



19 East Bijou Street 



Photographs of our Colorado 
mountains. Nicely made — 
attractively colored by hand. 
Moderate in price — framed 
or unframed. 

H. L. STANDLEY 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs 



CADILLAC 

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MOTORCARS 

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! Marksheffel Building 



THE TIGER 



11 



COVERS 
ALL THE FIELD 



SPORTS 



FOOTBALL 
CROSS COUNTRY EQUITATION 



NEW MATERIAL MAKES 
TENNIS PROSPECTS GOOD 



Tennis prospects at Colorado 
College are bright for the first time 
in many years. Fighting for the 
four places on the teams will b e 
four lettermen, the former high 
school champions of two states and 
a large number of "racketeers" of 
unknown ability. 

Captain Koerner is the present 
city champion of Colorado Springs, 
and he is recognized as one of the 
outstanding players of the state. 
Koerner should make an excellent 
leader for the team as well as be- 
ing able to win many victories. Er- 
nie Waters, Dobson West, and Stan 
Geshell are all lettermen and cap- 
able of holding their own in any 
match. Owen Owens the former 
high school champion of Utah, and 
Hartley Murray, former holder of 
the same title in Colorado, should 
make strong bids for the team. 
Early indications point to a large 
squad and some of the pre-season 
favorites may never see action on 
the Tiger net team. 




Forty Entries In Cross Country Run 



GARAGE TIRE SERVICE 

CORDUROY CORDS 

Sidewall Protection 



FRANK SARLAS & CO. 

Shoe Shining and Repairing 

Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Quick Service 

132 E. Pikes Peak 



Forty men will compete in the 
cross country run to be held to- 
morrow afternoon. Each fraternity 
has entered a team to vie for (hon- 
ors. The race will be staged during 
the frosh-Wyoming game on Wash- 
burn field. This is the first event 
of this nature held since 1920. 
1 his year so much pressure was 
brought upon Jo Irish that he final- 
ly permitted those interested to ar- 
range this meet. Entries close at 
noon today, at wbich time all ap- 
plication blanks must be in the of- 
fice of the graduate manager. 

A large fifteen inch silver cup, 
donated by the Kendall Refining 
Company, w.ll be given the in- 
dividur.l winner. His name will be 
engraved upon it, and he shall have 
possession for one year. The first 
three-time winner shall have per- 
manent claim to it. 

The wining team will receive a 
jolid silver cup donated by Chuck 
Simons. This will not revert to 
future winners. 

The first ten placers will each 
receive a medal, first place getting 
a gold one, second place silver, and 
the next eight qualifiers, bronze. 
All of the awards are on display 
at the Colorado Sporting Goods Co. 

The distance of the run is ap- 
proximately two and one-half miles 
It will start about ten minutes be- 
fore the end of the first half of the 
end of the eastern straightaway. 
The runners will procede around 
the track to the gate and out there 
to the jungle, where they will en- 
circle the lake, and then return, 
.:r£t passing the starting point, and 
hen proceding around the track as 



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before. The finish line will be 
identical with that ordinarily used 
for the hundred yard dash — at the 
south end of the western straight- 
away. It is planned that the run- 
ners will finish between the halves. 

Jo Irish announced that the run- 
ners will use the second floor dres- 
sing room exclusively, and that 
every runner must wear a number 
on his back. These numbers, he 
said, would be obtained in the dres- 
sing room just before the race. 

Sigma Chi, Pi Kappa Alpha, and 
the Independents are the only 
groups on the campus not to have 
a team entered. Each of these or- 
ganizations, however, has one en- 
trant. Marvin Russell is carrying 
the Sig Chi colors, Jim Thompson 
will represent the Tejon street boys 
and Dolphus Stroud will run for 
the Independents. 

Kappa Sigma fraternity is send- 
ing five men into the combat. They 
have Ralph Dial, Joe Rohrer, Jack 
Kintz, Joe Brady, and Louis Yard. 
Ed Parker, varsity track captain, 
was entered, but has withdrawn. 

Phi Delta Theta is banking 
largely on Jim Magruder to run off 
with first prize. But backing him 
up, they have William Haney, 
James McElvain, Mervin Gulick, 
and William Neumarker. 

Delta Alpha Phi is ably repre- 
sented by R. J. Woodward, Earl 
Cochran, Clifford Brice, and James 
Craig. Woodward is expected to 
give Magruder the best race. 

Beta Theta Pi has entered a four 
man team composed of H. L. 
Wood,, Albert Giesecke, Gilbert 
Rice, and Winthrop Crouch. Crouch 
is a varsity high jumper, but it is 
doubtful if that will be any advan 
tage 'o him in this contest. 

Phi Gamma Delta has not as yet 
made known its team. Bill V; 
Dyke, the Fiji captain, says that 
undoubtedly Chuck Cogan will b 
thtir mainstay. 



This week's Candy Special 

40c lb. 



Assorted 
Chocolates 



BartherS 

Tejon Street at 
Acacia Park Comer 



TIGERS WIN FROM D. U. 
BY LAST-PERIOD RALLY 



By C. H. Blodgett, Jr. 
Denver University, the possible 
dark horse of the conference, turn- 
ed out to be definitely that w,hen 
they battled the Tigers to a 3-2 fin- 
ish in the D. U. stadium last Satur- 
day. C. C. had beaten Aggies-Den- 
ver had done nothing so spectacular 
and fans thought that the usual 
mediocre eleven would again re- 
present the up-state school. The 
Tigers went there and found their 
offense had been doped out to a 
'T', and the great Clark's attack 
was well bottled up. 

Over 16,000 persons witnessed 
the game, which will go down in 
grid history as one of the greatest 
ever fought on any conference field 
Both teams were giants on defense, 
and the greater part of the game 
was taken up with a kicking duel 
between the two captains of the 
elevens. Dutch held the edge in 
this department, but it was balanced 
by the greater driving strength of 
the Pioneers. 

Both teams went thru the first 
period without any sensational 
gains or plays. The Pioneers' first 
break came when Rea, rookie cen- 
ter on the Tiger crew, snapped a 
high pass to Clark who was to 
kick from behind his own goal. He 
was tackled behind his ovs^n line, 
scoring two points for the Pioneers. 
Neither team made any progress 
from that time until the last min- 
utes of the game, when Ingraham 
flipped a pass to Clark who got 
away for 14 yards. Two more 
passes gave the Tigers the ball on 
Denver's 38 yard line. The Tigers 
lost the ball, but Denver was forced 
to punt to Pomeroy, who had been 
sent in for Ingraham. He was 
downed on center field. Dutch 
and Jones lugged the ball for two 
yards, and then a pair of passes, 
two end runs, and a loss when 
Akin was tackled by Ketchum, gave 
the Tigers the ball on the 18 yard 
line. Clark dropped back, and 
booted the oval for a field goal. 
After a heated argument the goal 
was declared good, and the game 
was sewed up, with less than a 
minute to play. 

This game put Colorado College 
on top of the scoring column for 
the conierence. Aggies, D. U.. 
and Mines however have played 
three games to the Tigers' two. C. 
C. has a week of grace until they 
go to Logan to play Utah Aggies, 
in their third encounter of the sea- 
son. 



12 



THE TIGER 



BE 
POPULAR 




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Saunders System car. Drive one 
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Fords — Desotos — Chryslers 
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You Must Have 
Good Developing 
and Printing 

No print can be better 
than its Kodak nega- 
tive. So we first do 
Good Developing for 
every film. 

Then we use the type 
of Velox paper best 
suited to the negative. 
In this way we help you 
get best possible pic- 
tures. 

Sheaf for, Whal and 

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and Pencils to Match 

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I7N. Tejc 



ARCHAELOGICAL LECTURE 
PRESENTED THIS EVENING 



The Colorado Springs branch of 
the Archaeological Institute o f 
America will hold its first meeting 
tor the coming season on Friday, 
October 25, in the Pit at Palmer 
Hall, at 8:15 in the evening. The 
lecture will be an illustrated one 
and will be delivered by Dr. E. B. 
Renaud, Professor of Anthropology 
and Archaeology at the University 
of Denver. 

Dr. Renaud, who is a graduate 
of the University of Paris and re- 
ceived his higher degrees at t h e 
University of Colorado, has had 
many years experience in his work, 
both abroad and in the American 
southwest. His subject will be, 
"Prehistoric and Modern Pueblos" 
and the illustrations will include 
many photographs of unusual inter- 
est. There is no charge for admis- 
sion, and the public is invited to 
attend. 

W. W. Postlethwaite, President 
of the local society, announces a 
lecture by Dr. Louis E. Lord, of 
Oberlin College, in January; and 
one in March by Dr. Edgar L. He- 
wett. Director of the School Of 
American Research at Santa Fe. 
There is a possibility, also, of se- 
curing several other lectures by lo- 
cal men. 



They sat together 
Worked together 
All semester long. 
Played together, 
Strolled together, 
Happy as a song. 
Then— 

Crammed together. 
Flunked together. 
Wondering what was wrong 
A girl 



A date 



Perhaps 



A class 

A quiz 



No 



Out late. 



Gee Whiz. 



Colorabo 
Electric 

28 N. Tejon 

EDISON MAZDA LAMP 

Book Lamps, 
Clamp on Book $3.00 



4|i <ii iiiiiMiurNiiJii iiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijiNiiiiiiiniiiiiiijiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiii4> 



Petition Presented 

To Student Council 



Ten students of Colorado Col- 
lege petition the Student Council of 
the Associated Students of Colo- 
rado College to insert into the 
clause pertaining to the member- 
ship of the Council in the new con- 
stitution that one of the three Sen- 
ior women members shall be the 
President of the Associated Women 
Students of Colorado College. 



Sign on swampy road in Missou- 
ri: When This Sign is Under Wat- 
er this Road is Impassable. 



There is this advantage about 
drinking bootleg whiskey — if it is 
poison the blindfold test will be 
easy. 



To acquaint the public with the new 

GOLDEN CYCLE SHINE PARLOR 

We are offering a First Class 

SHINE FOR 5c 

By Presenting this Coupon 

(Todd) COLBERT BROS. (John) 

Lobby of the Golden Cycle Bldg. 

Tejon and Pikes Peak Avenue 



DR. DRUCKER WRITES 
ARTICLE ON BUDGET 



The September issue of "Th 
Accounting Review" contains ai 
article entitled "Budgeting and Th 
Sales Quota", written by Professo 
A. P. R. Drucker of the J. M. Be 
mis Department of Business Ad 
ministration and Banking of Colo 
rado College. In this article Profes 
sor Drucker discusses the advantag 
es to business concerns of settini 
up a budget at the beginning of th 
fiscal period, and calls attention t 
the fact that criticism of this sys 
tem usually comes from those wh( 
have failed to use scientific meth 
ods. "The Accounting Review" i 
a quarterly published by The Amer 
ican Association of University In 
structors in Accounting. 



Under New Management 

The College 
Barber Shop 

Ralph Schildknecht, Proprietor 

103 E. Cache la Poudre 
Colorado Springs 



Stthscrihe NOW for the 



"TODAY'S NEWS TODAY' 



GAZETTE-TELEGRAPH 

Morning — Evening — Sunday All The News All The Time 



Daily Only 
55c per month 



Combination 
$1.30 per month 



Daily and Sunday 
75c per month 



BUILDING supplies of course include at the same time every- 
thing used in repairs, improvements, etc., with Mill Work 
of the highest class workmanship. 

CRISSEY-FOWLER 

LUMBER COMPANY 



117 W. Vermijo 



Main 101 



Knorr's Market 

FOR YOUR PARTIES OR PICNICS 



Let us supply you with 
good things to eat 



123 North Tejon 



Phone 2602 



THE TIGER 



13 




Here's Your 

VICTOR RECORD 

Come in and hear the latest releases 
in our ventilated trial rooms. 



Headquarters for RADIO 
VICTOR, MAJESTIC, FREED, 
ATWATER KENT AND CROSLEY 
113-115 N. Tejon 



g>„ 



ggfIgss 

FVRNITVRE tU. 



ELECTROL OIL BURNERS 
Plumbing Heating 



312 N. 
Custer 



^"^'feki 



Phone 
Main 
1674 



SUITS & OHRCO ATS 

CLEANED and PRESSED 
$1.00 




_aundry 

".".'' Dry Cleaning 



Quality 



Service 



STUDENTS 

Why not replace that old scratchy foun- 
tain pen, with a new and better pen. We of- 
fer the three leading makes to choose from 
and all styles in each line. Also you will 
find several makes of pencils to select from 
if you don't care to use a pen. 

TheJvlURRAY 

Dru^ Co. 



21 S. Tejon 



832 N. Tejon 



LIBRARY IS CRITICIZED 
FOR LACK OF SYSTEM 

I deplore those persons who is- 
sue epithets hurriedly, insisting that 
there is no room for them being 
wrong. In behalf of this article, 
may I say that I have been almost 
a year composing it. That is, sev- 
eral months ago some incidents 
took place at Coburn library, be- 
tween the personnel and myself, 
that inspired me to attempt an ex- 
pose. But it was only an attempt, 
for no sooner had I started it than 
I thought that I might have been 
in error, and so let it drop. A few 
months later, however, another oc- 
curence, somewhat similar to the 
previous one, riled me to such an 
extent that I used the public library 
almost entirely the remainder of the 
semester. 

And now comes the start of a 
new year, and evidently the start of 
another year which will be known 
for its library inefficiency! With- 
out harking back to the past, please 
permit me to introduce three exhib- 
its, each less than a week old: 

Exhibit A: I ask the girl at the 
desk for a copy of the Bible. "I'm 
sorry, but we do not keep the Bible 
here," was her reply. "What," I 
exclaimed, "no Bible in the libra- 
ry!" "No", this young woman in 
charge repeated, "we .have separate 
copies of some parts of it, but no 
whole edition." Remembering that 
all lists of 'Twenty Most Important 
Books' that I had ever seen includ- 
ed the Bible as one of the primary 
inclusions, I was unable to compre- 
hend her statement, so I repeated 
my question, and she again told me 
that there was no Bible in the li- 
brary. Now I ask you, is this ef- 
ficiency and or intelligence? For 
those of you who might believe this 
young librarian's word, allow me to 
say that later by reference to the 
catalog we were able to locate 
one. 

Exhibit B: I obtain from the 
card catalog the call number of a 
certain book, and give this slip to 
the librarian, asking her where that 
number would be. Evidently im- 
bibed with a little spirit to assist 
one, she led me around the laby- 
rinth, and finally remarked that "it 
should be around here." Then, 
presumambly, s,he espied it, jerked 
it from the shelf, and handed it to 
me. I gratiously thanked her — 
and then found that she had been 
just a shelf higher than the book I 
had requested. Again I ask you, 
in this efficiency or intelligence? 

Exhibit C: It was prescribed 
that I read a certain book. Realiz- 
ing that I would have no time to 
do so during the day. I early made 
reservations al the library to take 



Tiger Club Selects 
Fourteen New Members 



At a special meeting held Tues- 
day morning by the C. C. Tiger 
Club, 14 new girls were elected in- 
to membership, bringing the enroll- 
ment up to 30. 

A slightly new system of selecting 
members was used this year. The 
Club alone choses its members and 
they consist of six girls from each 
society and six Independent girls. 
Formerly, each organization sent 
its own representatives. 

During the coming year, it is the 
purpose of the club to cooperate 
more with the Growlers than it has 
done before. At pep meetings as- 
semblies, and parades, it will take 
as active a part in stirring enthusi- 
asm as will the men's club. 

Beth Smith, president, stated that 
it was the ultimate aim of the club 
to turn the organization over to the 
Sophomore girls, thus making it a 
purely class group. However, all 
former activities and traditions will 
be carried out. Plans are also be- 
i'.g put under way to apply for a 
charter to the Women's National 
Pep organization, the Spur. It is 
thought that application will be 
sent during the year '29-'30. 

I he girls newly elected are Ma- 
rie Benning, Bettie Lansdown, Eliz- 
aiieth Kennedy, Carol Edwards, 
Clydette Higginbottom, Virginia 
Graham, Hilda Burch, Mary Stra- 
chaii, Hazel Biddlecomb, Katherine 
Powell, Louise Wiley, Evelyn Stub- 
blefield, Eleanor Watts, and Alyce 
Ii eland. 



the book out overnight. I was as- 
sured that mine was the first appli- 
cation and therefore would obtain 
the volume. My preparation for 
the next day's lecture was planned 
with that arrangement in mind. But 
Lo! when I called for my book that 
evening, I was informed that it had 
been given to someone else. How, 
I inquired, could that happen, when 
it was supposedly reserved for me. 
"Well, you see," the young woman 
told me, "the librarian that took 
your slip misfiled it. It was way 
off from where it should have 
been." And then I recalled that 
the girl to whom I had given the 
reservation slip was the same one 
that look the book from the wrong 
shelf for me. Again I must ask 
you, is this efficiency or intelli- 
gence ? 

— Jay Howard Russell. 



CHOCOLATES 
Good as Made 

Box Goods a Specialty 
WALLACE CANDY COMPANY 



14 



THE TIGER 



HUGHES' 
CHOCOLATES 

Try our Saturday 
SPECIALS 




THE 

WHITE WAY 

SYSTEM 

Open Until 2 A. M. 

Try our delicious White 
Way Chili 

Snappy Curb Service 

1 1 N. Tejon St. 



Broken Lenses Duplicated 

Save the Pieces 

Eyes examined Lenses Ground 




THE LAUTERMAN-DUGAN 
JEWELRY AND OPTICAL CO. 

Jewelers, Optometrists and 

Mfg. Opticians 

Fine Watch, Clock and Jewelry 



1 2 1 N. Tejon St. Rhone Main 674 

LOOK YOUR BEST 

Have your hair cut in the 
approved manner. 

Pete*s Barber Shop 

8 E. Cucharras St. 



PAUDRE-PAUFFE 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Permanent Finger and Water 

Waving 

Manicure and Scalp Treatments. 

Marcels 50c. 



S ervices for your 
car that includes 

Proper Lubrication 

100% Alemite 

LEADING MOTOR OILS 
Weaverized Washing 

Tire Repairing Road Service 

Drive in Today 



FIRESTONE TIRES 
117 N. Nevada Phone M. 202 



Russell Henritze, Dave Moffett, 
Fred Nichols, James McCluskey, 
and Rupert McClung drove to 
Trinidad over the week-end. 

Mrs. Walter Slane and daughter 
Barbara of Saguache stayed at Mc- 
Gregor Hall Thursday night while 
visiting Irene Slane. 

Mr. Lennuel Pitts of Pueblo vis- 
ited his daughter Mary E. Pitts at 
McGregor Hall on Saturday. 

Lorayne Dean returned to Mc- 
Gregor Hall Saturday afternoon 
after spending a week in the in- 
firmary at Ticknor. 

An "antique," somewhat resem- 
bling a nineteen twenty-four model 
Chevrolet owned solely by "Fat" 
Hayden, received a major "injury" 
Monday to the extent of a broken 
rear axle. Anyone in the market 
for a Chevrolet rear axle should 
see Hayden at once. He states 
that he will let it go at a real sac- 
rifice. 

Jack Conley and Gordon Minter 
are in Torrington, Wyo, working 
for the Holly Sugar Co. They will 
be back in school next semester. 

A notice of recent books com- 
piled by Harry M. Hubbell for the 
Classical Journal includes a book- 
let, "Two Types of Thirteenth Cen- 
utry Grammatical Poems" by John 
Paul Heironimus and Josiah Cox 
Russell. Mr. Russell was in instruc- 
tor in history at Colorado College 
for several years. 

Dean A. P. R. Drucker, presi- 
dent emeritus of the Labor college, 
was the speaker at the meeting of 
the Open Forum at the district 
courtroom of the county courthouse 
on Sunday afternoon. Professor 
Drucker spoke on "The Aims of the 
Labor College." 

Dr. Barton Hoag is the author of 
a book entitled "Electron Physics" 
which has just been publisihed by 
D. Van Nostred Company, Inc. of 
New York City. Dr. Hoag gradu- 
ated from Colorado College in 1921 
and then did graduate work at the 
University of Chicago, obtaining 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
in 1927. He was a major in Phys- 
ics and also an Instructor in t h e 
Army Radio School of Colorado 
College in 1918. 



"A History of Music" written by 
Mrs. E. C. Wilm will soon be off the 
press. This is not Mrs. Wilm's first 
book. Reports from the MacMil- 
lan Company which published Mrs. 
Wilm's book, "The Appreciation of 
Music," last year, show a large sale 
both in the United States and Great 
Britain with scattered sales on the 
continent. 

Many college students attended 
Mrs. Wilm's lecture recitals en- 
titled "How to Listen to Music", in 
the fall of 1927. The material for 
her new book was taken from these 
recitals. Mrs. Wilm presented a 
program at the Coffee Hour on 
Sunday, October 13. 

Mrs. John Speed Tucker, instruc- 
tor in voice in the department of 
music, went to Denver on Saturday 
to act as one of the judges in the 
Atwater Kent radio audition which 
was held Saturday. There were 
nine judges chosen for the con- 
test. There were so many contes- 
tants that two auditions had to be 
held. The programs were broad- 
cast over K A. 

It is the business of every loyal 
Colorado College student to learn 
their College's songs. All Fresh- 
men women are required to learn 
them by Thursday evening. 



WHITE HOUSE GAVEL 



Professor Gordon Parker, Dir- 
ector of the Colorado School of 
Forestry, has just received from 
National Lumber Manufacturers As- 
sociation an interesting souvenir in 
t h e form of a gavel made from 
timber removed from the White 
House in process of remodelling The 
wood from which this gavel was 
made is Longleaf Pine which was 
originally built into the mansion 
during the residence of President 
James Madison in 1815. It has help- 
ed to support the roof of the ex- 
ecutive mansion for 112 years dur- 
ing the residence of twenty-six Pres- 
idents of the United States. 

Professor Parker was invited to 
deliver an address on the Colorado 
School of Forestry before the Den- 
ver Hoo Hoo Club on Friday, Sept- 
ember 20, on which occasion the 
presentation was made by the Pres- 
ident of the Club. The gavel will 
be placed in the collection in the 
rooms of the Forestry School. 



A SERVICE 
for Every Purse 



THE 
PEARL LAUNDRY 



BUICK MOTOR CARS 



Strang's 



Harry D. MacDonald 
President 



THE J. S. BROWN 

MERCANTILE 

COMPANY 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



Made in Colorado Springs 

VAN BRIGLE 
ART POTTERY 

The world's most famous 
art pottery. 

Visitors always welcome. 



Wear a Tiger "Woolie" and "Mum' 
to the Game. 




30 N. Tejon Phone M. 214 



Phone Mam 1710 

IDEAL 

1 CLEANERS 

5 West Colorado Ave. 



Valetor Pressing Service 



THE TIGEH 



15 



COSSITT 
DINING HALL 



Back your College 

in every good thing 

— even in eating 




THE COST IS MODERATE 
FOR THE BEST OF MEALS 



WEEKLY RATE $7.25 
Credit for Single Meals 



V 



^ \ 



16 



THE TIGER 







. .in the revue 



its Pep/ 




in a 



cigarette it's |AS T E / 



"True merit is like a river; th© 

deeper it is, the less noise it makes." 

There is nothing sensational about Chester- 
fields; good tobaccos, blended and cross-blended, 
the standard Chesterfield method, to taste just 
right. But — haven't you noticed how smokers are 
changing to Chesterfield, for that very reason — 

"TASTE above evert/thing ^' 





MILD ... and yet 
THEY SATISFY 



hesterfield 

FINE TURKISH and DOMESTIC tobaccos, not only BLENDED but CROSS-BLENDED 



1929, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



SUPERIOR 

Dry Cleaning Co. 

Telephone 1364 129 N. Tejon 



Our Specialty 



CHILI 



25c Shident Lunches 



COLLEGE INN 



Dancing 



Radio 



Special Annual Homecoming Edition 





9bc Colorado College ^^ 

f \\\\\d\f\W% 





VOLUME XXXII 

Number 7 



Official Students' Publication 

November 1, 1929 



i TiiiiiMiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiniiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiirinniiiiiiiiiiriiiiiriiiJiMiiiiiiiMiiiui 



CHAMPIONSHIP TIQEF, TEAM 






m 




THE UNDEFEATED TIGER team of twenty years ago which claimed the cham- 
pionship of the Rocky Mountain Conference by wins over the Colorado Springs High 
School, the University of Wyoming, the University of Utah, the School of Mines, the Kan- 
sas Aggies, the Colorado Aggies, and Denver University. 

In 1909, C. C. beat the Utah Redskins by a score of 21 to 17. What will be the 
result of the championship battle this year? 







;-;^l 




Office of Publication: 23 West Colorado Ave.. Colorado Springi, Colo. 



THE TIGER 



We Outfit the 
Tiger Teams. 

Beat Utah/ 

— and make 

HOMECOMING 

one grand and glorious time 

C. C. Alumni know that the logical place 
for the best selections in every kind of 
outdoor clothing is at the Colorado Sport- 
ing Goods Company. We would like to 
make the acquaintance of new C, C. stu- 
dents as well as renew the acquaintance 
of the home-coming Alumni. 



The rOLORADO SPORTING 
^ GOODS 
pOMPANY 

\^ "Outdoor Outfitters" 

Otis E. Mclntyre, Pres. 
107 North Tejon Street 




Too Busy to Write? 

Another college year has started — football 
holds the spotlight now — in the Conference and 
throughout the nation. If you're from out of 
town you probably have already found there is 
little time to write home. 

Try weekly telephone chats. Tell your fam- 
ily when you will call, then just give the oper- 
ator the number of the telephone at home. You 
and your family will agree it's far more satis- 
factory than letters and not expensive. Call 
every week — charges can be reversed if you 
prefer. 



THE Mountain States 
TELEPHONE & Telegraph Co. 



WELCOME ALUMNI 

HOMECOMING! 

What memories it brings — what a 
pleasure to mingle with former class- 
mates and reenact old times — and the 
thrill — especially this year when the 
"Up and at 'Em" Tigers come from 
their lair to feed on Utah. 



We're backing the Tigers. 




_^ utidry 

and j)f.jf Cleaninq 



Quality 



Service 



Welcome 
Home! 
Old Grads 







It's Homecoming at "The Boys", too. 
We'll be expecting you and we'll all be 
boosting for a Tiger Victory. 



"Trade with the Boys" 

Pikes Peak at Nevada 
Final football results at our store after the game. 



Issued Friday of each week. Entered at the Post Office at G)lorado Springs as Second-Class Matter. 



VOLUME XXXII 



GTHEo TieFoR 



Colorado College Weekly News Magazine 



Number 7 



FANS LOOK FORWARD TO 
C. C. UTAH STATE GAME 



Game Promises To Be The Make 

Or Break Encounter of Schedule 

Each Have Impressive Record 



With the C. C. Homecoming 
game but a week off, fans are al- 
ready focusing their interest on the 
Utah Contest — the game of the 
season that promises to be the 
'make or break' encounter of the 
Conference. Utah will have a per- 
fect average when they enter the 
game, and the chances are good 
that the Tigers will also be on top 
of the percentage column. Both 
teams .have impressive records for 
the season. Both have defeated 
Colorado Aggies, considered one of 
the formidable contenders for the 
title, on this side of the hill — and 
both teams are being primed for 
what will undoubtedly be the cru- 
cial tilt of the season. 

Colorado College will throw 
their full strength on the field. 
"Dutch" Clark will lead his Tigers 
in ihis last game against the Utes. 
Lyle Jones, consistent ground gainer 

(Continued on papre 11) 



NEARLY 200 ALUMNI 

TO ATTEND 

LUNCHEON 



The annual Homecoming lunch- 
eon of Colorado College is to be 
served in the dining-room at Bemis 
Hall, November 9 at 12:20. It is 
expected that nearly 200 former 
students of C. C. will be present. 

After a three-course luncheon, 
the grads will have a regular old- 
fashioned pep meeting, before the 
scheduled game in the afternoon. 
Ex-football stars are going to make 
speeches, after which the group 
will sing some College songs. 

The committee in charge of 
preparations includes Miss Dorothy 
Roberts, dietician of Colorado Col- 
lege, Miss Ruth Morrison, Colo- 
rado Springs, who was president of 
the Alumni Association last year, 
and Mr. D. L Boyes, of Colorado 
Springs, now president of the Asso- 
ciation. 



Copeland Recovering 

From His Operation 

William D. Copeland, secretary of 
Colorado College, who recently un- 
derwent an operation for appendici- 
tis, is recuperating very satisfac- 
torily. He will remain in Denver 
till fully recovered at the home of 
Mr. Stannard, his father-in-law. 



Alumni to Make 
A Large Parade 
For Homecoming 



Another great Homecoming Day 
is almost here, and with it comes 
one of its most successful events — 
the Homecoming Parade. For many 
years the enthusiasm and friendly 
rivalry shown by the various frater- 
nities and societies have contributed 
greatly to the parade, and this 
year's exhibition promises to sur- 
pass them all. 

According to Duke Tucker, chair- 
man of the Homecoming Parade 
committee, the line will form at 
Murray's about 10:30 o'clock. As 
the Alumni Association has prom- 
ised to double the length of any 
parade the college can produce, it 
is necessary that every man be in 
the line and all girls who have cars 
are requested to decorate them 
with black rnd gold streamers and 

BEAT UTAH signs. 

Following the plan so • success- 
fully adopted last year, the Home- 
coming committee will again offer 
prizes to the best fraternity float 
and to the best society float. It has 
already been rumored that various 
secret arrangements are being 
made, for each group is intent on 
beating all rivals. 

At the next meeting of the Inter- 
fraternity Council, the various fra- 
ternities will draw for their places 
in the parade. 



ALUMNI WILL RETURN TO C. C. 
FOR THIR TEENTH HOMECOMING 

By Mark Perkinson 
Foremost in the minds of all students and alumni of Colorado Col- 
lege, comes thoughts of that greatest of all traditions — the Homecoming. 
The celebration this year will be the thirteenth in the history of the 
school. It is interesting to recall the origin and previous history of this 
now famous event. 

Contrary to the opinion of many. Homecoming day, as a distinct 
date on the social calendar, is of relatively recent origin. The first 
gathering of alumni, known as 



KOSHARE PRESENTS 

PLAY FOLLOWING 

GAME 



Work on "The Wild Duck", Ko- 
share's first production of the year 
is advancing rapidly with an effi- 
cient cast working long and hard to 
make the performance of outstand- 
ing growth. A good performance 
of this production, usually thought 
beyond the ability of amateurs will 
put Koshare on a firm foundation 
for a dramatic season such as Colo- 
rado College has seldom known. 
The set for the play is being built | 
by the director, Mr. Arthur Sharp, ! 
assisted by Kenneth Peterson, stage 
manager, who is in turn assisted by 
Arthur Bishop and Gene Lague. 
I As is the tradition, Koshare will 
I again present a play on the Satur- 
day evening of Homecoming Week. 
j This year Lord Dunsany's "A Night 
I at an Inn", a thrilling mystery mel- 
odrama will be presented. 



Programme for Thirteenth Homecoming 



Program 
Friday, November 8 

Registration — Administration Build- 
ing 
Morning and Afternoon 
Hypatia Tea for Alumni and Socie- 
ties 
Bemis Hall 4 until 6 p. m. 
Pep meeting — Cossitt Stadium — 
7:30 p. m. 
Saturday, November 9 
Society Breakfasts 8 a. m. 

Minerva Chapel Inn 

Contemporary .... Antlers Hotel 

Hypatia Antlers Hotel 

Zetalethian . ...Broadmoor Hotel 
The Big Parade— 10:30 a. m. 
Alumni Luncheon — Bemis Hall — 

12 Noon 
Colorado College vs. Utah Univer- 
sity — Washburn Stadium — 2 
p. m. 
President and Mrs. Mierow will 
be at Home to the Alumni and 
Friends of the College at 24 Col- 
lege Place immediately after t h e 



game. 

Informal Dinner 



Bemis Hall 6 



yj. III. 

Buffet Suppers at Society and Fra- 
ternity Houses 6 p. m. 
Minerva, Hypatia, Contemporary, 

Zetalethian. 
Beta Theta Pi, Phi Delta Theta, 
Delta Alpha Phi, Phi Gamma 
Delta, Kappa Sigma, Pi Kap- 
pa Alpha, Sigma Chi. 
Koshare Club Play — 8 p. m. — 

Cogswell Theatre. 
Open House for Alumni and 
Friends at Bemis Commons 
8:30 until II p. m. 
Committees 

General Chairman 

Richard Vanderhoof 

Program Margaret Prewett 

Publicity Ellsworth Richards 

Pep Meeting Glen Wade 

Parade DeWitt Tucker 

Hospitality Earnest Nowels 

Decoration — Lois Seebach, Lorna 
Dorlac 



"Homecoming Day", was started in 
1915. On November 13 of that 
year the custom was inaugurated at 
an alumni luncheon held in Cossitt 
hall. That year the Tigers played 
Aggies and were defeated 24 to 13. 

One hundred alumni came back 
November II, 1916 for the second 
Homecoming. Though hampered 
by one of the worst snow storms in 
history the Tigers defeated Boul- 
der that day 58 to 0. After the 
game an alumni luncheon was held 
at which Miss Lillian Johnson pre- 
sided. 

Due to the effect of the World 
War no Homecomings were held on 
the years of 1917 and 1918. 

But in 1919 Homecoming was a 
definitely recognized social date. It 
was held that year on October 31- 
November I . Colorado College was 
victorious that day, winning from 
Mines by a 7 to 3 score. An alum- 
ni banquet and a parade downtown 
in which the alumni participated 
were the outstanding events of the 
day. 

Playing a hard game through 
mud and snow, the Tigers held 
Boulder to a to tie on the 
fourth annual Homecoming in 
1920. Alumni banquets were held 
this year at Cossitt and Bemis. 

In 1921 the Homecoming cele- 
bration took place October 28-29. 
The outcome of the game that year 

(Continued on page 13) 



Woodbridge And Zeitlin 

Publish Two Volume 

Work 

Homer Woodbridge, formerly 
professor of Englis,h at Colorado 
College is co-author with Professor 
Jrcob Zeitlin of a two volume book 
published by Farrar and Rinehart 
on the "Life and Letters of Stuart 
P. Sherman", who in 1926 was at 
the Colorado College summer 
school and gave a series of lectures 
on English literature. Professor 
Woodbridge is now a professor of 
English at Wesleyan University in 
Connecticut. 



THE TIGER 



Colorado College Coaching Staff For 1929 





PICKHARD 



HERIGSTAD 



VANDENBURG 



Every plunge, dash, tackle, block, 
or any other football capers that 
the Tigers cut, brings out in no 
mean way, the results of days and 
weeks of untiring effort on the 
part of the Bengal pilots — the three 
coaches. 

"Bully", who needs no introduc- 
tion to any man in this part of the 
country has, through his gridiron 
mastery, made himself stand out as 



a maker of teams to be feared by 
all. His work in putting Colorado 
College on the football map is of 
the caliber that few may equal and 
none excel. 

This year, we have one "Olie" 
Herigstad, recruited from Pueblo 
Central High School and brought 
here as director of physical educa- 
tion. During his six year's seance 
in the Smelter City, Olie turned out 



^ 



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Come in and hear 
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"Better Equipped Than Ever 
To Handle College Trade." 



CAMPBELL'S 

BARBER SHOP 



109 East Pikes Peak Avenue 



ALUMNI RESERVE MANY 
SEATS FOR HOMECOMING 



By Kendrick Stone 
According to present indications 
the big Homecoming day game 
with Utah University will be a com- 
plete "sell out". Tickets were 
placed on sale last September, and 
an ever increasing demand has kept 
the pasteboards going fast. Mail 
order requests are steadily increas- 
ing and it is fair to prophesy that 
one of the largest crowds that ever 
witnessed a football game will 
crowd into Washburn Field, on the 
afternoon of November 9. Jo Irish, 
graduate manager, has received 
many requests for tickets from 
alumni, and he has accordingly re- 
served the north half of section 5, 
and all of section 7 except the last 
five rows, for them. All seats are 
reserved and sell for $2.00. There 
will be no reduction in this price 
before or during game time. 



ROESSNER 

three league championship football 
teams and one state title-holding 
eleven. A record for any coach to 
shoot at. His time with the Tiger 
aggregation goes mainly to the 
backfield, where the Bengal backs 



VAN de GRAAFF 

are being primed to gallop over the 
rest of the conference. 

From 'way down South where the 
University of Alabama holds forth, 
"Freddie" Pickhard, primed for a 
cold winter and ready to build a 
football line that will teach them all 
something. The way in which he 
has succeeded shows that his coach- 
ing days at Spring Hill College were 
not idly spent. 



Our Specialty 



CHILI 



25c Student Lunches 



COLLEGE INN 



Dancing 



J. C. CULLEY, Prop. 



Radio Music 



Just E^eceived — 

A shipment of Ladies street and 
novelty footwear in brown, black, 
and midnight blue. 

From $5 to $7.50 

SHIIBtDS J&OOTERT 

111 E. Pikes Peak 

A complete line of ladies 

Goloshes $2.50 to $3.50. 



THE TIGER 



Official Notices 



The Euterpe Musical Society will 
meet in Room 13, Perkins Hall on 
Tuesday, November 5. Mrs. Reutl- 
inger will be the hostess. 



THE 

WHITE WAY 

SYSTEM 

Open Until 2 A. M. 

Try our delicious White 
Way Chili 

Snappy Curb Service 

1 1 N. Tejon St. 



Phi Belt Tea Dance To 
Have Direct Utah Wire 



As there will be no radio broad- 
cast of the Tiger-Farmer game to- 
morrow, Rhi Delta Theta will spon- 
sor a tea dance, with arrangements, 
which are being completed, that 
will hook-up the Phi Delt house on 
the press wire, furnishing a running 
story of the game, play by play. 

Glenn Wade announces that it 
will be a subscription affair, to help 
defray the expenses of the service. 
All students are invited. The con- 
tribution will be seventy-five cents 
per couple. 

Bob Shonsby and his orchestra 
will furnish music for the after- 
noon. 



A large fleet of white Zip Service trucks serve our 
many customers faithfully. 

^(/MBERWG alongsince /87^ 



Newton Lumber e^ mfg.Co. 



PHONE MAIN 62 



COLORADO XPRING-T 



PiCCLY&WlCCLY 



^ 



ALL OVER THE WORLD 

FIVE BUSY STORES IN 

COLORADO SPRINGS 



Tucker-Dodson's 



is still THE Men's 

shop of Colorado Springs. 

Welcome 
C. C. Alumni to the Home- 
coming. We would be 
pleased to have you call on 
us. 

Wear one to the game. Col- 
legiate Snap Brim Hats. 
$2.50 



C. C. Meets Utah Aggies in Game 
Which Decides Standing of Team 



The fighting Tiger squad will en- 
ter the third close contest of the 
hardest schedule in the conference 
Saturday, at Logan, Utah, with the 
choice of the winner narrowed 
down to two teams in the popular 
mind — the Tigers, or Utah Aggies. 
Beyond that uncertain statement, 
nothing definite may safely be fore- 
cast regarding the battle. 

The Farmers will line up with a 
team ranking near the peak in 
weight, and a name for a danger- 
ous passing game also, one Call be- 
ing their star hurler. They expect 
to show even more than in past 
games, since there are some regu- 
lars back in the lineup after a sea- 
son on the injured list. With only 
one defeat against them, they are 
grinding their teeth in preparation 
for a chance to tear down the per- 
fect percentage of their guests. 

Colorado College offers the hard- 
est scrapping line in several years, 
considerably reinforced over last 
week by the recovery of Weaver 
and Hayden from injuries which 
kept them on the bench two weeks 
ago. The backfield is also in better 
condition, with Hinkley's ankle and 
Ingraham's knee in the best shape 
of the season, and ready to boost 
tacklers out of Clark's path, or run 



drive. Everything points to a tip- 
top performance from the Black 
and Gold. 

Reports have it that Logan is in 
a cycle of bad weather, but two 
evenings of rompmg in the snow on 
Washburn field have toughened the 
Tigers to cold and slush, and they're 
ready to beat the Aggies' best. 



LOOK YOURBEST 

Have your hair cut in the 
approved manner. 

Pete's Barber Shop 

8 E. Cucharras St. 



"You're Sure They're Pure" 

Chocolate 
Creams 35c lb. 

For Saturday, the 2d, 
we'll offer as our feat- 
ure assorted Derngood 
Chocolate Creams — the 
feature that's always a 
treat. 

Another good one for 
Homecoming Day, too. 

26 S. Tcjon DCm'S 



the ball toward the line, on 



pass or 



TIGER FANS GIVE TEAM 
ENTHUSIASTIC SEND OFF 



Twenty-four Tiger football play- 
ers accompained by Coaches Van 
de Graaff and Pickhard, and a 
number of managers, trainers, and 
a few Tiger fans, left Thursday at 
10:55 for Logan, Utah. School 
was dismissed at ten-thirty in order 
that the student body might escort 
the team to the train. In spite of 
the weather, a large number of stu- 
dents and all of the band paraded 
the street and down to the station. 
A hearty send-off was given t h e 
Tiger warriors. 



This week's Candy Special 

35c lb. 



Bitter 
Sweets 



Barthel'S 

Tejon Street at 
Acacia Park Comer 



REX HOTEL 

Colorado Springs 




^ 



^ 



We deliver sandwiches and Soda fountain drinks at 
all times to the halls. We also have hot plat lunch- 
eons. 

JOHNSON-ENGLISH DRUG CO. 
134 N. Tejon Phone M. 1400 



Football weather — Big Game. No Pipe to 
Sasieni — Lewis — Kaywoodie Pipes. 



OsfeORM CiGtARd Go 



Smoke? What! You're out of the picture. 
The leading pipes of the world. 



d) 32 Years your tobaccoist. 



THE TIGER 



Member of Rocky Mountain 

Inter-Colleg:iate Press 

Association 




The Colorado College 

Newspaper, 

Published Weekly by the 

Students. 



LLOYD H. ELLIS Main 1975 ...Editor 

James Keyser Associate Editor Barratt O'Hara Desk Editor 

Chauncey H. Blodgett, Jr Sport Editor Margaret Gillen Society Editor 

Mark Perkinson Feature Editor John W. Haussei-mann, Jr Lit. Editor 

REPORTERS 



Melba Adams 
William Baker 
Margery Barkley 
Art Baylis 
Arthur Bishop 
Carl Burke 



Marjorie Gilbert 
Frances Glau 
Clifford Goodson 
Marjorie Ferguson 
Wayne Campbell 
Effie Gilbert 



Marie Hagemeyer 
Wilmoth Harris 
Archie Hess 
Don Horton 
Hei-mina Kahn 
Fred Nichols 
T. E. Nowels 



Hartley Murray 
Velma Rose 
Ivan Schweninger 
Ralph Smith 
Kendrick Stone 
Tom Tate 
Clifford Vessey 



JAMES PATTERSON Main 2575 Manager 

Frank Dentan, Jr Advertising Manager 

Advertising — Harry Wood, Nelson Brown, Max Schmidt, Byron Whaley, Doc Gulick 
and Homer Bruce 

Merritt Ritter Circulation Manager 

Assistants — Glen Wade, Jack Fisher, Charlotte Pipkin, Elsie Winship, Marguerite 
Smith, Ruth Griffin and Margaretta Barr 



Articles intended for publication should be left in the Tiger Box, on the first 
floor of Coburn library, by Wednesday noon. No unsigned contributions will be 
published. 



THE DENVER CLARION 

In the Tuesday, October 22, edition of the Denver Clarion, there 
are several statements which appear to many to be a rather sland- 
erous and personal stand for seemingly broad minded college journal- 
ists. To devote over one fourth of a newspaper to the discussion and 
opinions concerning the "robbers of the game" and personal remarks 
concerning "Dutch" Clark and "Bully" Van de Graaff would seem to 
have fitted some yellow sheet much better than the Denver Clarion. 

The students of Colorado College would prefer that such com- 
ment come directly from the editor, and not from the news writers 
of the paper. Such journahsm, written hastily in the heat of anger 
and dissappointment, brings neither a closer fellowship between two 
colleges nor does it correct any evils. 



A PERMANENT STAFF 

In the past six weeks, the editors of the Tiger have been assigning 
articles to prospective candidates for the Tiger staff. From week to 
week, the names of those who contributed to the publication have 
been printed on the editorial page. In this week's issue, a more or 
less permanent staff has been announced. Although the number of 
reporters is larger than was anticipated it is believed that every mem- 
ber fully deserves his position on the staff. 

In the hubbub of getting the paper organized, some students, 
who have wanted to work on the Tiger, have been neglected through 
no fault of theirs. ( Applications for the staff of the Tiger will be 
taken until the mid-semesters. After that time, no person will receive 
recognition or social credits except in exceptional cases. 



HOMECOMING. 

: The stage is all set for the thirteenth Homecoimng celebration of 
Colorado College. For the past month, the Homecoming committee has 
been working out plans for the best celebration in the history of the col- 
lege. With the football team, still undefeated, and with a likely pros- 
pect of beating Utah Aggies at Logan tomorrow, the C. C.-Utah State 
game is expected to be a championship game. 

Freshmen have been collecting wood for the biggest bonfire ever. 
The Booster's Club have planned an evening of fun and Tiger spirit for 
the Friday evening preceding the game. The business men of Colorado 
Springs have promised a float for every decorated float produced by 
college students. None of the alumni will go hungry considering the 
number and plans for the fraternity and society dinners and the Home- 
coming lunohecn. 

The plans have been made, and they are being carried out. The 
only addition to the present program to make the 1929 Homecoming 
the greatest in the history of the school, is to have the greatest number 
of alumni that has ever returned to Colorado College. It remains for 
the alumni alone to support the student body for their work is com- 
pleted. Nothing would please the Homecoming committee better than 
lo be swept under by a record breaking crowd. 



Former Editor 
Congratulates 
Tiger Editor 

Editor, The Tiger, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 

My Dear Sir: 

Enclosed find my check for $2.00 
for this year's subscription to the 
Tiger. I am very much pleased 
with the new Tiger. As an Editor 
way beck in 1895 you can imagine 
what a great kick I get out of the 
progress you are making. In my 
private opinion you are putting out 
the best paper Colorado ever 
published. It gave me great joy to 
see that Colorado College beat the 
Aggies October 12th. I read the 
score in the New York Tribune. You 
are going to have a good football 
year. Don't get overconfident 
though. 

I have been teaching in the Med- 
ical school at Yale for about fif- 
teen years. We have hard days 
ahead with Dartmouth, Army, 
Princeton and Harvard so there is 
plenty to worry about here in New 
Haven. 

Best regards to everybody, 

W. E. Hartshorn, '95. 



Hour Glass 



October 19, 1928 

Koshare held its annual try-outs. 
Those selected included Maxine 
Moore, Mowbray Drummond, Mil- 
dred Strachan, and Edith Blotz. 
October 17, 1927 

Tigers defeat Montezuma by an 
82-0 score. 

Hypatia held their annual pledge 
dance. 

October 19, 1926 

Booster Club pays one-half of 
the band expenses, in order that the 
band might accompany the football 
team to Fort Collins. 

Ticknor girls gave a party for 
their sisters in McGregor. 
October 29, 1910 

The fighting Tiger spirit enabled 
C. C. to defeat the University of 
Utah at Salt Lake City last Satur- 
day by a score of 21-17. 

Louise Kampf (now librarian) 
has been given a part in the junior 
class operetta. 

There is in process of organiza- 
tion a new club to be known as the 
Quill Club. 

Louise Auld entertained Hypatia 
at a sewing party last Thursday 
afternoon. 

November 8, 1907 

The Kappa Sigma freshmen en- 
joyed a social evening with their 
lady friends at Bruin Inn last Satur- 
day. 



LARGE ENDOWMENT AND 
BUNG PLANS MADE 



By Melba Adams 

The trustees of Colorado College 
with the cooperation of the officers 
of Alumni Association and Alumni 
adopted an Expansion Program to 
include the following objectives: A 
student body of a 1000, additional 
endowment funds of $2,500,000, 
new building funds of $1,000,000. 
This is a careful estimate of the 
needs of Colorado College with the 
aim for a greater Colorado College. 

Tuition fees of students of Col- 
orado College cannot keep C. C. 
going. Students pay 40% of what 
it costs to educate them and the 
College must supply the difference 
of about $300.00 for each student. 
This must be supplied through in- 
come from endowment or invested 
funds. As the endowment funds 
of Colorado College amount to ap- 
proximately $2,500,000, there is an 
annual deficit of $25,000 in operat- 
ing expenses. It is the aim of this 
Expansion Program to procure an 
additional endowment of $2,500,- 
000 which will take care of this an- 
nual deficit, strengthen and enlarge 
the faculty, and make available an 
enrollment of 1000 students. 

The building needs of Colorado 
College include the following: A 
modern dormitory for men, a girls' 
gymnasium and swimming pool, a 
modern power plant and a new li- 
brary building. Just recently E. P. 
Shove of Colorado Springs, a trus- 
tee, gave $250,000 for a memorial 
chapel which will be erected here. 

Alumni groups in important cen- 
ters are making plans for the en- 
dowment and building campaign. 
Denver alumni with Don C. Mc- 
Cleery acting as chairman were the 
first to get started. They have just 
finished their campaign with very 
good results. Chicago is trying to 
do a similar thing and will stage a 
pep banquet on December 3rd to 
start off the drive. Following the 
same policy Grand Junction will 
have their banquet on November 
8th. Colorado Springs' campaign 
will be held November 19-22 inclu- 
sive, preceded by a banquet on No- 
vember 15th. Dr. Mierow will 
address all of these receptions. 



NOTICE 

Women students who need to 
borrow money to help them through 
the college year and who wish to 
avail themselves of the Loan Fund 
of the Women's Educational Society 
may do so by asking Dean Fau- 
teaux for particulars. 

The committee of the Society 
meets the first Thursday of each 
month. Applications should be 
made before that date to be acted 
upon for the current month. 



THE TIGER 



W. I. Lucas 

HAS 
EVERYTHING IN 

SPORTING GOODS 
"Tigers always welcome" 

119 N. Tejon St. 
Main 900 



for hot, clean 

clinkerless fuel 

— call the "coal phone' 

M 577 




COAL/ 



^' 



^ 



Strachan's 
Sweet 
Shop 

Bijou and Nevada 

Try our Malts and Toasted 

Sandwiches 



OT 



CITY COAL 

15 East Pikes Peak Avenue 

Phone 

Main 67 or 120 



PLAZA 

DINING 
ROOM 

'The Place to Eat" 

Breakfast Luncheon 

Dbner 



SOCIETY 



Crescent club held its annua! 
formal at the Broadmoor hotel on 
Saturday evening, October 26. The 
affair was held in honor of the fol- 
lov/ing pledges — Ruth McDonald, 
Dorothy Chamberlain, Jean Horan, 
Elizabeth Skidmore, Martha Her- 
bert, Gretchen Sherk, Dorothy 
Horn, Serena Williamson, Mar- 
guerite Smith, Martha Sharer, Phyl- 
lis Ormsby, and Isabel Conroy. The 
guests included Pat Patterson, 
Winthrop Crouch, Burton Paddock, 
Harry Wood, Albert Cruzan, Jim 
Killian, Alvin Foote, Dean Triggs, 



Stewart Wilson, Bill 
Gilbert Rice, Roy 
Nelson Brown, 
son Jackson, 
Bill Hillhouse 



Van Dyk 
Vandenberg, 
Elvin Griffith, An- 
Dick Vanderhoof, 



Harold Harmon, 
Harry Peterson, Henry Perkins, 
Tommy Jones, Joe Rohrer, Mow- 
bray Drummond, Art Bishop, Bill 
Anderson, Forest Danson, John 
Thurston, Elton Slate, Chauncey 
Blodgett, Humphrey Saunders, 
Ralph Conroy, Franklin Emery, 
Dan Santry, Gene Wienberger, and 
Don Davis. Mr. and Mrs. Loring 
C. Lennox, Mr. and Mrs. E. C. 
Sharer, end Mrs. Louise W. Fau- 
teaux chaperoned. 

■^ ■^ >— 

Zetalethian society held a dance 
at the club house, Saturday even- 
ing, October 26, honoring Mary 
Strachan, Alice Gillette, Helen Hult- 
man, and Elizabeth Sweetman, 
pledges. Dean and Mrs. Charlie B. 
Hershey, Mrs. Gordon Parker, and 
Professor Archer B. Hulbert chap- 



eroned the affa 
Marian McCleary 
Margaret Enyart, 
Sidney Harding, 
Ha 
Ak 



The guests were 
Elinor McCleary, 
Dave McArthur, 
Bud Robinson, 
Id Rea, Loren Chaney, Harold 
Harry Matheson, Jim Thomp- 



son, Bill Bell, John Coward, Charles 
Page, Ted Peck, Paul Vestal, 
Thomas McCrory, Lawson Sumner, 
and Bill Beatty. 



Miss Virginia Marbut, pianist, 
and Mr. Gateano Dennessi, tenor, 
furnished the music for the coffee 
hour program at Bemis Hall, Sun- 
day, October 27. 

College students who will take 
part in the American Legion Follies 
of 1929 to be presented at the 
Burns theater m late November in- 
clude DeWitt Tucker, Elvin Grif- 
fith, Johnny Thurston, Clare 
Jencks. 

Beta Theta Pi will entertain at 
dinner at the chapter house, on 
Saturday, November 9, following 
the Homecoming game. A number 
of Alumni are expected to attend. 



"Open house" was held by Zeta- 
lethian society at the club house on 
Friday afternoon, October 25. 
About two hundred visitors called 
during the afternoon to see the new 
home of the society. Mrs. Charles 
Sisam and Mrs. G. B. Lefwenhagen 
served. Honorary members of the 
society include Mrs. William D. 
Quackenbush, Miss Jane Quacken- 
bush, Mrs. A. E. Davies, Mrs. C. 
C. Mierow, Mrs. Herbert Mierow, 
Mrs. William Frances Drea, Miss 
May Howbert, Miss Edith C. Bram- 
hall. Miss Jessie Hutsinpillar, Miss 
Marjorie Crouch, Miss Genevieve 
Turner, Mrs. Charles Sisam, and 
Mrs. William Mason, Jr. 

The Contemporary tea for honor- 
aries will be held at the club house 
tomorrow afternoon, from four un- 
til six. 

The Town Girl's association will 
not have its annual fall dinner this 
evening' as was previously an- 
nounced. The affair will probably 
be a Christmas party which will be 
held some time before the holidays. 
Definite announcement of the date 
will be made later by Marjorie Fer- 
guson, president of the organiza- 
tion. 

Three former Colorado College 
students are enrolled in Leland 
Stanford University. Preston B. 
Albright '28 is doing graduate work 
in History, Frank T. Lewis '29 is 
taking a business course, James 
Watson Montgomery is registered 
for regular undergraduate work, 
in Antomy. 

Frank J. Figge '27 after spend- 
ing a year at the University of Colo- 
rado Medical School as assistant in 
anatomy and graduate student, has 
gone to the University of Maryland 
where he will continue work in An- 
tomy. 



When you consider that you • 
can purchcue any make type- 
writer on monthly payments 
as small as $5.00 it is not a 
question of affording it. 

The essential question is if 
you can afford to be without 



C//y ' The 

Typewriter 
Man 

125 N. Tejon Main 95 






HOLLY SUGAR 

is 
the Best 

Sugar the essential food. 

HOLLY SUGAR 
CORPORATION 



Q' 



[uality 

Cleaners and Dyers 

SUITS, O'COATS 

HATS $1.25 

U-Fone 1-8-1-1 We'll CaU 

H. A. Thompson 
10 E. Kiowa 



DUTCH 

for touchdowns and CKJTCH 
(Hammond) for new driver- 
less cars. 

New Fords 7c per mile; 
30c per hour. 

New Cheve Six's 8c per mile; 
35c per hour. 

Office 

ELK HOTEL 

Phones M. 346 and 2065 
Free Delivery 



WHY NOT 

Learn Tjrpewriting 
while attending Col- 
lege? Your teachers 
will appreciate type- 
written work to be 
checked. We can ar- 
range hours to suit 
your convenience. 



%' 



a 







THE TIGER 



BEAT UTAH 




SPORT 



1. 



TRO 




Largest Homecomi 



TWO VIEWS of the Utah-C. C. game of 1924 when the Tigers nosed out the Redskins 
seven to six. This picture shows the last kick-off of the game. 






FIELD PHELPS, left, and Roy 
Vandenburg, right, captains respec- 
tively of the Tiger warriors of 1927 
and 1 928. Phelps i s well known 
for his sterling drop kicking ability 
which decided many a game. Van- 
denburg, now Freshman coach, 
played quarterback and did much 
to further Tiger victories. 



1925 HOMECOMING LUNCHEON 







CAPTAIN HEAVY LINGER, on the 
tain Waiss, on the right, leader of the 






THE TIGER 


9 


(UTAH 


PHOTOS 


BEAT UTAhJ 



|/ Ever In Washburn 
















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T- 


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A PASS to MacDougall from Schoonoever placed the ball on the Utah two-yard line 
/here Burghart went over for a touchdown and Greiner kicked the goal for the deciding tally. 



the Tiger football team in 1921, and Cap- 



UTAH 



FRANK JORY, on the 
right, captain of the Tiger 
in 1926, will long be re- 
membered for his leader- 
ship and ability. The in- 
terior decorations on tke 
left, of the Kappa Sigma 
fraternity house, which 
took first place, in the 
contest for the best dec- 
orated fraternity house at 
last year's Homecoming. 




UTAH HANGED IN EFFIGY IN 1925 




10 



THE TIGER 



Alumnus Elected Head 
Of Univ. Of Arizona 



Dr. Homer L. Shantz, '00, is 
president of the University of Ari- 
zona since 1928. After attending 
Cutler academy and graduating 
from Colorado College, Dr. Shantz 
went to the University of Nebras- 
ka, then to Columbia, and finally 
to the University of Louisiana. 
Working as the head of the depart- 
ment of agriculture plant life de- 
partment, he made two expeditions 
into Africa. While in Africa, Dr. 
Shantz made an intensive study of 
all plant life in the African terri- 
tory explored, collected new speci- 
mens, and made a study of African 
Agricultural methods. 

Leaving government work. Dr. 
Shantz, became head of the agri- 
cultural department of the Univer- 
sity of Illinois. In 1927, he re- 
ceived a call to the presidency of 
the University of Arizona, and in 
1928 took up active work there. 



The Ice Cream 
that's a C. C. 
^Institution" 

The between Class "Cones", 
t h e sandwich materials and 
candy, the ice creams and ices 
for class and club functions. 

From Frosh to Grad it's t h e 
place every Tiger knows. 

Mo WHY'S 

Across from Campus 

Main 1183, 1184 



FRATERNITIES PLAN 
HOUSE DECORATIONS 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



As the time for Homecoming 
draws near, each fraternity is be- 
ginning to make plans for their 
scheme of house decorations. As 
yet, these plans are incomplete, and 
no definite idea can be obtained 
from the various groups about the 
Homecoming appearance of their 
houses. 

In accordance with the usual 
custom a cash prize will be given 
this year for the best decorated 
fraternity house, the prize itself, 
which is usually small, does not 
count as much as the honor and 
publicity which is bestowed on the 
winning group. Last year Kappa 
Sigma won first prize and will no 
doubt be in the running again. 
Each of the other fraternities are 
putting forth added efforts in or- 
der to secure first place. The 
amount of the first prize has not 
yet been determined, but according 
to "Doc" Vanderhoof, chairman of 
the Homecoming Committee, the 
winner this year will receive a 
larger sum for their efforts than 
has been given in the past. 

This Homecoming will undoubt- 
edly be one of the biggest and best 
in the history of the school; the 
Homecoming football game should 
draw one of the biggest crowds in 
the history of Washburn Field, and 
in order to keep pace with the other 
affairs, the fraternities will have the 
best house decorations they have 
ever had. 



Zetalethians Hold 
Open House Friday 

The Zetalethian society of Colo- 
rado College held "open house" at 
their attractive new club building, 
16 W. Cache la Poudre street, Fri- 
day afternoon. Mrs. Charles Sisam 
and Mrs. G. B. Lefwenhagen served. 

Inspection of the new club house 
called forth the admiration of the 
guests. The furnishings are very 
attractive and the house is one of 
the most convenient erected for 
college entertaining. The Zeta- 
lethian society raised the funds to 
build the club house, a sufficient 
portion of the budget being raised 
in the last three years to make the 
building possible. Many lovely 
gifts were presented by friends of 
the society. 

Miss Frances Glau is president of 
the society; Emma Lou McBroom 
vice president, Carol Edwards, sec- 
retary; Lois Brown treasurer. The 
honorary members of the society 
are Mrs. William D. Quackenbush, 
Miss Jane Quackenbush, Mrs. A. E. 
Davies, Mrs. William Francis Drea, 
Mrs. Herbert Mierow, Mrs. C. C. 
Mierow, Miss May Howbert, Miss 
Edith Bramhall, Mrs. C. B. Hershey, 
Miss Jessie Hutsinpillar, Miss Mar- 
jorie Crouch, Miss Mabel Bay, Miss 
Genevieve Turner, Mrs. Charles 
Sisam, and Mrs. William Mason, 
Jr. 



ORDER 

"SALLY ANN" 

CAKES AND CANDIES 

223 E. Yampa Main 1547-W 



Tufts Gives Address 
For Freshman Womer 



T. J. Collier T. M. Collie. 

V. L. Collier 

TheCOLUER 

LUMBER CO. 

Phone Main 386 
543 W. Colorado Ave. 



Miss Helen Tufts of the Collegi 
ate Bureau of Occupations in Den 
ver spoke Tuesday to the Freshmai 
women on the various occupationa 
opportunities which are open t< 
them. This week, every girl w i 1 
be given an opportunity to havi 
personal interviews with Miss Tufts 
Miss Tufts will endeavor to givi 
helpful advice regarding the variou 
positions open to the girl who ha 
the background of a liberal Art 
education. According to Miss Tuft 
the day has passed when the grad 
uating women believes it necessar 
to either marry or teach school. Thi 
modern girl is invading the busines 
world of men and she may choose < 
career for herself from the numer 
ous modern developments. 



REX HOTEL 

Colorado Springs 




?gfe 



rSAUNDERS 



Drive It Yourself 



SYSTEM 



Fords — Desotos — Chryslers 

D. C. HUTCHINGS, Mgr. 

Phone Main 1800 

21 No. Cascade 



We are old "Grads" at the game of 
Cleaning Pressing 



Dyeing 
'Eat 'em Up Tigers' 



Repairing 




WEL- 
COME 
ALUMNI 



We will be closed during the gami 
and Rooting for the best team in thi 
conference. 



*Eat 'em Up Tigers' 




"Phone us first" Main 2958 




THE TIGER 



11 



COVERS 
ALL THE FIELD 



SPORTS 



FOOTBALL 
CROSS COUNTRY EQUITATION 



KINTZ LEADS KAPPA SIG 
TEAM TO MARATHON WIN 



The marathon track classic, stag- 
ed between halves of the C. C.- 
Wyoming Frosh game, played Sat- 
urday, was won by Jack Kintz, who 
led his fraternity, Kappa Sigma, to 
the team championship. Kintz ran 
the course, which is little better 
than two miles, in 15 minutes, 
35''^' seconds. Dolphus Stroud, 
colored distance runner, came in 
second. 

Kintz will keep possession of the 
McDougal Trophy, awarded to the 
winner, for one year, as the trophy 
must be won three times to become 
the permanent possession of an in- 
dividual. The first ten finished re- 
ceived medals, and Kappa Sigma 
received permanent possession of 
the team cup. 

Team champinship was awarded 
to the team finishing and .having 
the numbers of their finish- 
ing order add to the least total. 
Kappa Sigma led the Independents 
by five points, and Delta Alpha Phi 
was third with 48 points. 

Final standings were as follows: 
First, Kappa Sigma with 30 points 
(Kintz I; Dial, 4; Yard. 7; Rohrer, 
18). Second, Independent with 35 
points (Stroud, 2; Hammer, 5; 
Hess, II; and Ayers, 17). TTiird, 
Delta Alpha Phi with 48 points 
(Cocharne, 8; Woodward, 10; 
Brice, 12; and Craig, 16). 

Individual places were taken in 
the following order: Kintz, Stroud, 
Cogan, Dial, Hammer, Thompson, 
Yard, Cochrane, Russel, and Wood- 
ward. 



REX HOTEL 

Colorado Springs 



The Trip that Bankrupts the 
English Language 

CORLEY 

Mt. Highway 

Cripple Creek in high gear 



Tigers Tackle Utah 

(Continued from page 3) 
when given a slit in the line, will 
be one of Clark's three running 
mates in the backfield. Ingraham 
and Irwin are the two other mem- 
bers of the quadruple threat that 
Coach "Bully" Van de Graaff will 
throw at the Utes. 

The same old line, that battled 
the stubborn D. U. wall for four 
quarters, will put its greatest effort 
into the encounter. 

Reid and Heter, two boys that 
starred in earlier games this season, 
will hold down the wing positions 
in all probability. Both have been 
doing high calibre work on offense, 
and will prove to be tough obstacles 
to the Utah attack. The Starbuck 
duet will be back at tackle berths. 
'Fat' Hayden, stock guard of last 
year will be at it again for the big 
game, with McGrory or "Squato' 
Southard on the other side of the 
line. 

Rea, big center who received ihis 
baptism under fire in the D. lU. 
game, will run 'Doc' Weaver a close 
race for the call for center. Weaver 
has been troubled with a game 
shoulder most of the season, and 
the chances are that it will keep 
him for the encounter next week. 

The Crimson Horde will bring a 
team that promises to be one of the 
'fightingest' crews that the confer- 
ence has seen in years. 

Last week they walloped Aggies 
with a pass combination, and a stiff 
line attack. They can be banked 
on to do the same next week. They 
marched down the Aggie field for 
a touchdown, 13 plays after the 
kick-off, all of which goes to show 
that they have a stream of attack 
that will take a foxy eleven to 
fathom. 

Watkins on one end and Clark on 
the other offer a double threat to 
the Tiger passing defense. Olsen 
and Simpkins, tacklemen, opened 
holes of sufficient width to allow 
one of their backfield men to slice 
thru for three and four yards at a 
crack. Welch, Lybbert, and Jonas 
were the mainstays in the center of 
the line 

Should the Tigers get thru this 
week's game with Utah Aggies, the 
Homecoming game next week will 
decide which one of the two elevens 
will have to come down from the 
top of the heap. 



WYOMING AND C. C. 
PLAY TO SCORELESS TIE 



PLAZA HOTEL BEAUTY SHOP 

Finger wave — Marcels 

Permanent Waves 

Phone Main 2515 



By Ivan Schweninger 
Through four periods of defen- 
sive football the Tiger Cubs and 
the Wyoming Frosh battled to a 
scoreless tie last Saturday. The 
Colorado line stopped the shifty 
Wyoming backs time and time 
again, while the Tiger backfield 
slipped through gaps in the Cow- 
boy line for telling gains, but the 
team never developed an attack 
that could be concentrated into a 
score. 

Ray Ryan played a bang up 
game all the way through. His 
passes were accurate, and the cen- 
ter of the line proved to be no place 
for Wyoming backs. Dave "Big 
Boy" Moffat, at guard, spilled 
everything that came his way. The 
other guard position was filled, and 
filled adequately, by McClurg, who, 
with Ryan and Moffat, kept every- 
thing pretty well corked up. The 
keystone positions were held down 
by Weidman and Roark. Both 
looked mighty fine. Weidman dis- 
played an uncanny ability to mess 
up interference and nail the Wyo- 
ming runner before he was sure he 
was started. Rahm at one of the 



Tennis Entrants Must 
Get Entry Applications 

Entries for the fall varsity tennis 
tournament may still be received. 
Those interested in tennis are urged 
to hand in their names before next 
week in order that provision may 
be made for meeting other players. 
Names should be handed to either 
Captain Koerner or Prof. Penland. 



wing positions played a hard game, 
and in his anxiety to get the tackle, 
he was sucked in on Wyoming's 
triple pass play which worked only 
too often. Stillman on the other 
end played "heads up" all the 
while. Hall showed himself an end 
that demanded attention. The 
whole line functioned viciously for 
that hour Saturday afternoon. In 
the backfield Schnurr, Butterfield, 
Bradshaw, Owens, De Holtzer, 
Deutsch, and Schweninger saw ac- 
tion. Each gained substantially at 
intervals but never could mass 
enough yardage to cross the final 
marker. The interference was not 
rotten, or even bad. We would say 
the ball toters gained in fine fash- 
ion if we consider how an end was 
waiting on every end run, and the 
secondary defense was charging in 
to boot. 



Fight 'Em Tigers 

it* Go After the Championship 

iC Everyone Admires a Champion 

i* REMEMBER 

j STUDEBAKER 

t is the World's Champion Automobile 

I VAN DYKE MOTOR CO. 



To Alumni of Colorado College— 

Wouldn't you like to know what's going on around the Colo- 
rado College Campus? The Tiger, our new weekly magazine, 
contains news of every type pertaining to C. C. and its multitu- 
dinous activities. 

Mail the blank with your check for $2.00 to The Tiger, 
Colorado Springs, Colo., and you will receive this publication 
each week. 



Name.. 



Address. 



12 



THE TIGER 



wwwwwwwwwww^wwwwwwwwwwm 



Home Coming-Saturday, Nov.9th 

TIGERS versus UTAH 




Entends an invitation to you to make 
their new Store your meeting place 
that day and all other days. 



College Party Frocks 
in the New Silhouette 



Charming frocks with the new 
and modern trend of higher 
waistHnes and longer skirts — 
skirts with uneven hemHnes 
that flow and trail in most 
graceful manner. These are 
the frocks you will be happy 
to wear to college parties. 
Chiffon in blackberry, blue 
haze, dahlia, flame, eggshell, 
cantaloupe and black. Also 
washable satin in several 
shades. 



$22-50 



TCKIRKWOOD-K 




• *- 



STUDENTS 

Why not replace that old scratchy foun- 
tain pen, with a new and better pen. We of- 
fer the three leading makes to choose from 
and all styles in each line. Also you will 
find several makes of pencils to select from 
if you don't care to use a pen. 

ThelvfURRAY 
Drug Co. 



21 S. Tejon 



832 N. Tejon 




THE TIGER 



13 



Cogan, Anderson, Willis, 

Perkinson Head 

Germans 



The second meeting of the Ger- 
man Club will be held at Ticknor 
Study at 7:30 on Wednesday, No- 
vember 6. The first meeting was 
held on October 9 when the follow- 
ing officers were elected: Jerry 
Cogan, president; Roland Ander- 
son, vice president; Matilda Willis, 
secretary; and Mark Perkinson, 
treasurer. Mrs. Sutton gave a very 
interesting talk on "Old Heidel- 
berg". Songs were sung with Mrs. 
E. C. Wilm at the piano. All Ger- 
man students are urged to come to 
the meetings which are held on the 
second Wednesday of each month. 



Ask your dealer for Smith's 
Packing Co.'s package bacon 
Sliced fresh every day. 
Smith's tiny breakfast saus- 
age made fresh every day. 



T'^^ Smith's 

Packing Co. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 



ALUMNI WILL BE ENTER- 
TAINED BY FRATERNITIES 



Homecoming Dinners? Yes, 
and Bigger and Better than ever! 
Such was the word of the day at 
the latest meetings of the various 
fraternities of C. C. 

Every fraternity is concoctmg 
plans for a Homecoming dinner that 
will assume an important role in 
making this year's Homecoming 
the best ever. The general ten- 
dency of the festivities, as evi- 
denced by the plans, is toward 
something with more originality 
than has been prevalent in past 
years. 

Some organizations plan to hold 
their dinners within the corridors of 
their respective houses, while others 
aspire to celebrate elsewhere. 
Dancing seems to be popular on the 
after-dinner programs. 

Every Homecoming dinner is 
scheduled to take place after t h e 
football game, Saturday, Novem- 
ber ninth. 



Under New Management 

The College 
Barber Shop 

Ralph Schildknecht, Proprietor 

103 E. Cache la Poudre 
Colorado Springs 



THIS SEASON 
YO U SIM PL Y MUST HA VE A 

RUMBLE SEAT 
COAT 



24.95 



Of course, you've seen them — 
those soft snuggly beaverlike 
coats — a favorite with those 
smart young people who ride 
about and do things. They're 
as smart as a fur coat, as warm 
—and as practical — but so in- 
expensive that they'll fit a school 
allowance. They're just the coat 
you want. 

FASHION WITHOUT EXTRAVAGANCE 

We Gitrt iJ.'Jl/* Green Discount Stamps. 



ICiHTS 



^ 



ALUMNI WILL RETURN TO 
THIRTEENTH HOMECOMING 



(Continued from page 3) 

was a 24 to victory for the in- 
vading Aggies. About four hun- 
dred alumni were present for the 
annual banquet. 

November 10-11, 1922, was the 
date of the next celebration. The 
Bengals defeated State then 15 to 
3. A big barbecue was held the 
previous night and alumni suppers 
for both men and women were giv- 
en after the game. 

All but two classes since the 
founding of the institution were 
present at the Homecoming lunch- 
eon held in 1923. At that time the 
Tigers took a great battle from 
Utah by a score of 7 to 6. (This 
is the only previous Homecoming 
on which Tigers played Utah) . 

The next year, 1924, Boulder 
beat the Tigers 26 to before a 
great gathering of alumni. In 
spite of the defeat a mammoth dem- 
onstration took place after the 
game. 

In 1925, during the last four 
minutes of play, the Aggies suc- 
ceeded in winning a great game 
from Colorado College by a 7 to 3 
score. The Homecoming turned 
out well in spite of the reverse in 
fortune. 

Nineteen twenty-six marks a ban- 
ner year for the celebration. At 
the dedication of the new stadium, 
before a crowd of 6000, the Tig- 
ers defeated Colorado University, 
21 to 0. It was the greatest Tiger 
day in history. 

Colorado College defeated Mon- 
tana State 28 to 7 at the Home- 
coming in 1927. Every year now 
was seeing an increasing number 
of "old grads" attending this an- 
nual event. 

Last year, on a snow swept field, 
the Tigers lost to Boulder 24 to 19. 
Despite the inclement weather the 
greatest crowd of alumni in the 
history of the school were present. 
An alumni luncheon was held after 
the game and a big All-College 
dance in the evening at Bemis Hall. 
Thus we see that Homecoming 
has made rapid strides from t h e 
time of its founding. Parades, 
alumni luncheons, dances and many 
other social affairs mark the alum- 
ni week. Of course the most im- 
portant feature of this time is the 
game. Tabulating the outcome of 
these previous contests we find that 
in twelve Homecoming games: 

Tigers have won 6 games 

Tigers have tied 1 game 

Tigers have lost 5 games 

In conclusion it is needless to 
say that this year's Homecoming 
will exceed any of the previous 
events both in respect to social suc- 
cess and to Tiger teamwork. 



ALUMNI WISH C. C. WILL 
BEAT UTAH 



According to reports from the 
Secretary's office, a large number 
of old grads will be present at the 
Homecoming celebation on Novem- 
ber 9. Invitations have been sent 
to the alumni, and replies from all 
sections of the country are coming 
in. Although quite a large part of 
the alumni are unable to come on 
account of the distance, about two 
hundred have already asked for 
reservations for the Homecoming 
luncheon. 

In practically all of the regrets, 
the same sentiments are expressed: 
"Here's to a big victory for C. C. !", 
"Best wishes to C. C", "So sorry 
I can't be there with the rest of 
the grads", and others of the same 
tone. 



AMEWeA 

WEEK OF NOV. 3 

The First $1,000,000 
All-Talking 
Picture— 




I)ROADWAT 



RIALTO — 

Starts Sat. 

DOUGLAS 
FAIRBANKS 

and 

MARY 
PICKFORD 

Together for the 

First Time 

in 

"TAMING 

OF THE 
SHREW" 

lOO'r TALKING 
The Immortal 
Comedy 
Sensation of 
WILLIAM 
SHAKESPEARE 



14 



THE TIGER 



Broken Lenses Duplicated 

Save the Pieces 

Eyes examined Lenses Ground 




THE LAUTERMAN-DUGAN 

JEWELRY AND OPTICAL CO. 

Jewelers, Optometrists and 

Mfg. Opticians 

Fine Watch, Clock Jind Jewelry 

Repairing 
121 N. Tejon St. Phone Main 674 





S er vices f o r y our 
car that includes 

Proper Lubrication 

100% Alemite 

LEADING MOTOR OILS 

Weaverized Washing 

Tire Repairing Road Service 

Drive in Today 



FIRESTONE TIRES 
117 N. Nevada Phone M. 202 



Called For — Delivered — Laundered — 
and Ready to Use 
SHEETS 7 



The Plaza Hashers take pleasure 
in announcing that their annual 
promenade will be held on Friday, 
December 6, in the main dining 
room of the Plaza Hotel. Guests 
of honor will include the Cossitt 
slingers. Bob Shonsby and his ten 
piece orchestra will furnish the 
music. 

Have you noticed the group of 
sweet girl graduates still hanging 
around Murrays, trying to compete 
with the girls in school? 

I suppose like the villian in the 
play, they are drawn back to t h e 
scene of former crimes. 

Things I Would Like to See: 

1 . An improvement in the Cutler 
bell ringing. 

2. The coaches sit still at t h e 
game. 

3. One of our freshman women 
smoke a big black segar. 

4. Taller girls and sihorter skirts. 

That famous kick of Dutch's may 
have been only a drop, but it made 
an awful splash. 



Your Own Photograph Made to your liking IN a Handsome 
Frame — Any Price you choose to pay. 

Exclusive photographers for the Pikes Peak Nugget. 

Wagner -Fults Studio 

Bums Bldg. 



YOU'LL BE THANKFUL ON 

THANKSGIVING DAY 

IF YOU WILL LET 

TOMPKINS & LEOPOLD 

Look After Your New Suit And Overcoat 

NOW IS THE TIME FOR ACTION 

Come in and see What We Have To 
Offer At 

$25 $30 $35 

TOMPKINS LEOPOLD 

1231/2 N. Tejon 



BATH TOWELS 

NAPKINS 

The Elite Way 

IS the Most Economical 

PHONE MAIN 82 



cents 
cents 
cent 




LAUNDRY and 
DRY CLEANING 



WiltTltou Be Saved? 

To Save you or not to 
save you — 

"THAT'S THE QUESTION 
WITH US" 

We cannot do so against 
your will — any more — than 
you can feel the thrills of a 
good football game without 
seeing it. 

LET US MAKE A BARGAIN 
You visit our new store and 
we will go to your football 
games. 

"Well, we go anyway" 
You too, be a Good Sport. 

If you come here and buy 
we give you thrills and save 
you besides — The difference 
between $40,00 and $45.00 
and our price which b 

$22.50 

Choice of more than 
a thousand — 

WHY — HOW AND 
WHEREFORE? 
Because we are conference 
champions — a link of a 
mighty chain — which lays all 
competitors low from New 
York to California. — by sell- 
ing direct from factory to 
you. 



i ^s © 



$22-50 

Every Kind of Suit 

Every Kind of Overcoat 

And Tuxedos 



Your manly form is 
improved 100 fold in 
one of ours — Show her 
your better self on oc- 
casions — "a thrill for 
her." 

They don't make 'em 
any finer under the 
half-century mark. 

Remember the 

'Furmbilt' 

CLOTHES 
for men 

at 20 N. Tejon 



<f 



Your home-coming Bonnet is here. — SPECIAL DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS 

Fisk — Gage — Budwig Ltd. and others. 

Better quality, Better Styles and lower prices— Guaranteed. 

MISS OSRORM, Par/or M///(-ner, ~ HI Morth Te/on glreet 



THE TIGER 



15 



A SERVICE 
for Every Purse 



THE 
PEARL LAUNDRY 



BUICK MOTOR CARS 



Strang's 



Harry D. MacDonald 
President 



THE J. S. BROWN 

MERCANTILE 

COMPANY 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



Made in Colorado Springs 

VAN BRIGLE 
ART POTTERY 

The world's most famous 
art pottery. 

Visitors always welcome. 



Ve; r a Tiger "Woolie" and "Mum' 
to the Game. 




N. Tejon 



Phone M. 214 



Phone Main 1710 

IDEAL 

I CLEANERS 

5 West Colorado Ave. 
Valetor Pressing Service 



Couture's 

French Cleaning and Dyeing Co. 

Phones 1288-1289 
218 N. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 



Go To 

M:iller Music Co. 

"Where Music Is Sweetest" 
13 North Tejon Street 

for Records and Music 
GEORGE L. MILLER, Prop. 



You may save with this Associa 
tion, any amount from one dollar 
up per week or month. 

We invite college students to call 
at our office (Ground floor loca 
tion) I 1 6 North Tejon Street, Colo- 
rado Springs. 

E. C. SHAKLK, President 
1 16 North Tejon Street 




toan 
anon 



CADILLAC 

and 

CHRYSLER 

MOTORCARS 

Adams Motor Co. 

Marksheffel Building 



%OMtUk^ 



TENT 6^ AWNING CO 



Awnings and Camp Supplies 



Frank Geddy Says— 

Welcome back 01' Gradsl 
EAT 'EM UP TIGERS 

The Shoe Shop 

Across from the High School 



FRANK SARLAS & CO. 

Shoe Shining and Repairing 

Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Quick Service 

132 E. Pikes Peak 



BUILDING supplies of course include at the same time every- 
thing used in repairs, improvements, etc., with Mill Work 
of the highest class workmans,hip. 

CRISSEY-FOWLER 

LUMBER COMPANY 



117 W. Vermijo 



Main 101 



COSSITT 
DINING HALL 

for Men 




Front view of Building 



THE COST IS MODERATE FOR THE 
BEST OF MEALS — IN CHARGE OF 
EXPERT DIETICIAN. 



16 



THE TIGER 



:?= 



Kaufmans l^tlf^r^^rrj Is First in Colorado 
Springs to Sponsor This 7\!ew Vogue 



Kaufman's, ever style-alert, welcomes fashions from 
this newcomer among the world's foremost style cen- 
ters. We have established California connections 
through which we now receive the newest fashions 
originated in this sparkling locale, as soon as they are 
produced, just as we receive Paris fashions from 
New York. Daringly different, flatteringly lovely, 
gayly original, these "Cinema Fashions" will delight 
Colorado College women. 





MARGARET LIVINGSTON 

chose this adorable dress of Spanish red crepe jolli, emphasizing 
the new high waisted silhouette. Note the smart cape effect and 
the overdrape edged with narrow scalloped pleatings. Clever bows 
of galyak add a touch of fur at neck and hipline - - - $45 

DALE WINTER 

lovely screen star, is shown wearing a distinctively smart coat for 
Winter sports wear. It exemplifies the feminine demand for warmth 
without weight. Miss Winter appreciated the superior quality of 
this imported tweed coat, and was charmed into choosing it be- 
cause of its interesting fashion points — flat caracul standing collar, 
patch pockets and raglan sleeves. $59.50 



Shown in 

Frocks, C^dts, 
Snsembles, 

7\legligees & 
Cingeric 

ALUMNAE and wives of ALUMNI are cordially invited to 
come and view these clever fashions — and see our photo- 
graphs of screen stars wearing them. 




JANEREID 
Hollywood movie star, is simply ravishing in this nebulous 
chiffon dance frock. Decollete of course, with lovely rose 
petal effects on the shoulders. The bodice is trimmed with 
tiny tucks and the full ruffled tier skirt touches the floor. 
Price $59.50 



V 



J 




VOLUME XXXII 

Number 8 




Obc Colorado College ^^ 

mmmm 

Official Students' PaUication 

November 8, 1929 



IIIIIIIIIMIIIMIMIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIlrlMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIII 



^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 



iiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiii 



STVDEJ^TS TUKN SOLDIEIiS 




A BATTALION PARADE of the Colo lado College Students Army Training Corps 
on Washburn Field during the period of instruction in 1918. Guard mounts, parades, 
and reviews were regularly held. In seven months, 355 men had graduated from the 
radio school and had landed in France; 200 had just completed their radio work and 
another 22 had received two months of intensive training in the collegiate section of 
the S. A. T. C. 




Office of Publication: 23 West Colorado Ave, Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE TIGER 




ROTHMOOR COATS 

Loads of Qirls will wear them 
to the game Saturday 

Naturally they will. They want 
to look their best. At football 
games, for motoring and all out- 
door occasions, Rothmoor's gay- 
ly colored imported fabrics, 
smartly tailored Parisian lines, 
exceptionally luxurious furs, 
will make any girl look her best. 

Camel Pile Coats 

$79.50 

Fur Trimmed Coats 

From $59.50 



6 East Pikes Peak Ave. 



"FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE" 

We Dry Clean 
Ladies* ^P-^^^'Thone US first" Gents' 

Dresses 1 ^ iT**'!!*^-— *^ ^^'^ 

Furs IV^OllCgg'" ^'^^^^^ Topcoats 

M. 2958 ^Etl^'' 



Called For — Delivered — Laundered — 
and Ready to Use 

SHEETS 7 cents 

BATH TOWELS 2 cents 

NAPKINS 1 cent 

The Elite Way 

IS the Most Economical 

PHONE MAIN 82 

LAUNDRY and 
DRY CLEANING 





They Miss You at Home 

— but letters take time to write — particu- 
larly after a long day in class, or with j'our in- 
terest centered in Saturday's game. 

It's easy to telephone home instead. It's 
quick, costs little — and, if you want, you can 
make the call "collect." Telephoning is more 
satisfactory than several letters. Try calling 
tonight — just give the operator j'our home tele- 
phone number, then tell your folks you will call 
every week. 



The Mountain States 
Telephone & Telegraph Co. 



Issued Friday of each week. Entered at the Post Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter 



'lOJT m 



(THQEd TieBR 



VOLUME XXXII 



Colorado College Weekly News Magazine 



Number 8 



UTAH A6G!E$ DEFEAT 
TIGERS BY SCORE 10-0 

By Wayne Campbell 
The Logan Farmers stopped the 
Tigers' undefeated march toward 
the conference championship last 
Saturday proving that the dopesters 
— and, alas, some of the Tiger play- 
ers, as well — .had underrated their 
offensive. Continual injuries to 
the visiting team so handicapped 
them that when they were ready 
in spirit the body was weak, so 
that the improved fight of the 
Tigers was insufficient to win back 
the game. 

Weaver was forced to retire with 
a drooping right wing after a score 
or so of plays, due to the incomplete 
healing of his collar bone sprain 
of two weeks before. Rae, how- 
ever, is fast improving with game 
experience into one of our most 
consistent linemen. During t h e 
middle of the game it began to 
appear that the supply of ends 

(Continued on page 11) 



Women Hold Session 

And Discuss Plans 



Activities and plans of the A. W. 
S. C. C. were discussed at the reg- 
ular meeting of the legislative 
board held in Bemis hall, Monday 
evening, November 4. It was an- 
nounced that the first inter-society 
tea for the girls of Colorado Col- 
lege will be held Friday, November 
22, in Bemis hall. Miss Sarah 
Evarts will speak. The tea is the 
first of a series being sponsored by 
the girls' societies, but all girls are 
invited to attend. Other matters 
discussed included the revision of 
the budget, girls' orchestra, plans 
for Homecoming, and publicity. 



Postlethwaite To Lecture 

At University of 

Iowa 



Lectures on archeology will be 
given at the University of Iowa in 
1929-30 by four men of reputa- 
tion in that field, according to an- 
noucement by Prof. Roy C. Flick- 
inger, head of the department of 
Latin and Greek. 

Heading the quartet is W. W. 
Postlethwaite, president of the 
American Archeological Institution, 
who will speak Dec, 3 on "Arch- 
eological Wanderings in the South- 
west." — University of Iowa News 
Bulletin. 



Fraternities Plan 
After Game Spreads 

Although Homecoming plans in 
the fraternity house are not definite- 
ly known by those in charge, there 
are indications thai th°ie will be 
plenty doing for everybody, actives 
and alumni. 

The Phi Gams, and the Betas will 
have their traditional buffet supper 
at their respective ihouses for all 
alumni and their families. This will 
be held immediately following the 
C. C.-Utah game. Al Giesecke is in 
charge of Beta plans while "Fluke" 
Van Dyke is the head man at the 
Fiji house. 

The Pi Kaps will have dinner that 
night after the game for their re- 
spective alumni, as will the Delta 
Alpha Phis. Dick Sanderson is in 
charge for the Pi K. A's. 

Although the Sigma Chis have 
not definitely set their plans, it is 
understood that a dinner at the 
house is in order for that night with 
their alumni as guests. Jim Keyser 
is the guiding star for the Sigs. 

The Phi Delts under the direction 
of Whit Sutton are planning the 
same thing with open house at the 
same time. Their plans have not 
definitely been made yet. 

At the same time of this writing 
the chairman at the Kappa Sigma 
house ,had not been able to be 
reached, but their plans are prob- 
ably the same. 



Labour College Uses 
Three C. C. Professors 



By Gregory Hoffman 
Ice cream! soda water! lemonade! 

pop! 
Tigers! Tigers! Always on top! 

Right this way, folks; see the 
frat boys' vodvil show! Get your 
money's worth for only one dime, 
two jitneys, ten cents. You can't 
go wrong here; step right in before 
the next show starts! 

Pleasure and loyalty, if you fol- 
low our advice, will thusly converge 
into one. For like the story back 
of the Spanish phrase reproduced 
above the big gala carnival at the 
Auditorium tonight will be an im- 
mense source of pleasure for a I I 
the merrymakers in attendance; 
but one's presence will also be a 
service to our alma mater inas- 
much as this gay entertainment was 
planned by those that have the wel- 
fare of the college in mind as a 



STUDENT ARMY TRAINING CORPS 
DISBANDEDELEVEN YEARS AGO 

By Fred Nichols 
Eleven years ago, on November llth, a stroke of Marshal Foch's 
pen ended the Great War. And on that day the thoughts of the stu- 
dents and alumni of Colorado College must inevitably turn to the part 
their school played in the great struggle. 

The first men were drafted for military work in Colorado College 
in May, 1918. The gymnasium and locker rooms of Cossitt were turned 
into barracks. In the dining room the fumed oak tables gave way to 
the long, bare pine boards of an 
army mess. The physics labora- 
tory wes equipped with special tele- 
graph apparatus. 

The collegiate section of the Stu- 
dent Training Corps officially came 
'nto being on the morning of Octo- 
ber 1 . The newly inducted men 
and candidates for instruction were 
assembled and billeted to the vari- 
our fraternity houses which had 
been taken over by the college as 
brrracks. During October, Mont- 
gomery and Ticknor were used as 
emergency .hospitals for influenza 
patients. 

Captain Rudd, the commanding 
officer, announced that his policy 
would strictly follow that of West 
Poir.t. This method of instruction 
seeks to ingrain in the soldier: dis- 
cipline, initiative and aggressive- 
ness, physical hardihood and con- 
fidence in the rifle. A large part 
of the training was close order drill; 
and guard mounts and parades 
were regularly held. Even during 
war-time, the men were encour- 
aged to maintain the usual autumn 
football work. 

In spite of the fact that the Col- 
lege was greatly handicapped, it 
achieved in a relatively short time 
a great and splendid war record. 



Three of the faculy of Colorado 
College will offer courses in the 
Colorado Springs Labor college 
which will be held every Wednes- 
day evening until February 5. A 
chautauqua course is being offered 
by the L-^bor college this year. The 
college is organized to promote 
adult education in this vicinity and 
all residents are eligible to attend 
without regard to previous educa- 
tion. 

Dr. Aubrey W. Goodenough, pro- 
fessor of English, will offer a course 
in "Sociology, the relation of man 
to man." Miss Amanda M. Ellis, 
assistant professor of English, will 
teach "English, the better use of 
our language." William D. Cope- 
land, secretary of the college, will 
take up "Public Speaking, the art 
c{ making a public address." 



Gala Carnival Spirit at And Tonight 



welcome home stunt for the alum- 
ni and a final gigantic pep meet- 
ng f'^r l,he Fighting Colorado Col- 
lege Tigers. 

It is planned th?t the entire stu- 
dent body, immediately following 
the formal pep meeting in the 
Greek theatre, will procede in a 
body down town to the city audi- 
torium. The townspeople will have 
assembled before that time. The 
rdmission price will be only twenty- 
five cents. 

And once inside! The entire 
floor space filled with every con- 
ceivable variety of carnival games; 
each fraternity, in rotation, present- 
ing a burlesque in the little theatre; 
and on the stage a continuous 
dance. What more, I ask, could 
you want for 



Sophomore President 

Foils Frosh Bandits 



Step up 
please? 



your money .•> 

folks! How many. 



Greeley, Colo.— R. M. I. P. A.— 
The freshmen at C. S. T. C. in up- 
holding their class honor felt that 
they should kidnap the sophomore 
president. They started an ex- 
haustive search for this individual. 
When t h e sophomore dignitary 
heard of the plan he got a smart 
idea. He mixed in with them and 
proceeded to help them attempt to 
find the sophomore president. The 
Mirror believes, "That the reason 
they failed to recognize him was 
because of his una.ssuming. youth- 
ful manner, and this hoodwinked 
the youthful desperadoes." 



THE TIGER 



HART SCHAFFNER & MARX CLOTHES 

at 

Waymire Clothing Co. 

24 S. Tejon St. 




STUDENTS 



Why not replace that old scratchy foun- 
tain pen, with a new and better pen. We of- 
fer the three leading makes to choose from 
and all styles in each line. Also you will 
find several makes of pencils to select from 
if you don't care to use a pen. 



TheMURRAY 
Drug Co. 

21 S. Tejon 832 N. Tejon 




SCOTCH GRAIN 

A college man's oxford 

in black or tan' 

Stylish — Serviceable — Sensible 
A real Tiger oxford like cut — 

$8.50 



^n 



Alpha K Psi Alumni 

Will Meet At Banquet 

The Alumni of Alpha Kappa Psi 
will have a chance to meet with the 
chapter at dinner, Sunday noon, I 
o'clock at Cossitt Hall. This meet- 
ing is arranged so that all the 
Alumni from out of town may come 
and get acquainted with the active 
chapter. A very good program has 
been arranged with a few speeches 
and novelty stunts. It is planned 
to have all the Alumni from Colo- 
rado Springs there and as many 
from out of town as possible. 



Alumni Fund Founded 
Over Three Years Ago 

The establishment of the Alumni 
Fund Association three years ago 
and the plan to secure a regular 
annual contribution to Colorado 
College demonstrates the loyalty of 
C. C. Alumni. There are approxi- 
mately five thousand graduates and 
former students of Colorado College 
from forty-eight states and twenty 
foreign countries and they will do 
their part. 



Faculty Members Attend 
Educational Meeting 

Four members of the Colorado 
College faculty are to take part in 
the meetings of the Colorado Edu- 
cational Association to be held in 
Denver Thursday and Friday of th'is 
week. 

Miss Susan F. Leaming, profes- 
sor of the history of art, will speak 
at the luncheon of the industrial 
arts section at Pueblo, Friday. 

Miss Vera Buck, as Colorado 
College Delegate to the seven hun- 
dredth anniversary of the founding 
of the University of Toulouse will 
speak at the meeting of the foreign 
language section at Pueblo, Thurs- 
day. 

William V. Lovitt, dean of men, 
will speak on "What it Takes to 
Make a Successful Teacher" at the 
meeting of the mathematics section 
at Pueblo, Thursday. 

In Denver, Dean C. B. Hershey 
will represent Colorado College in 
the presentation of the general 
topic, "The Articulation of the Pub- 
lic Schools with the Universities and 
Colleges of Colorado." Other in- 
stitutions represented in the group 
include the Colorado Agricultural 
College, The School of Mines, The 
Colorado State Teachers College at 
Greeley, The University of Colo- 
rado and The University of Denver. 



All applications for managership 
for Junior Farce must be handed to 
Grace Perkins before noon, Novem- 
ber 12. 



5Aoi;e Memorial 
Chapel's Plans 
Are Announcec 



At several conferences recentl; 
held between Mr. Eugene P. Shove 
the donor of the new Shove Me 
morial Chapel, President Charle 
C. Mierow and Mr. John Gray, Ar 
chitect, of Pueblo, several impor 
tant decisions were made regardini 
the program of construction an< 
the various items of equipment con 
templated for this important struc 
ture. 

The roof covering will be rougl 
cleft graduated slate of a sea-greei 
mottled color. 

The interior will have toolet 
stone trim, textured plaster walls 
and open timber roof construction 
with the use of color decoration oi 
same in the Chancel. The en 
trances and aisles of the Chape 
will ihave random slate slabs oi 
floors and the portion under th( 
pews will have cork tile or simila 
material. Wood panelling am 
furnishings wdll be of oak and wal 
nut. 

The Morning Chapel adjoinins 
the Chancel will have walls o 
tooled stone, wood beam ceiing witl 
color decoration, and floors of til( 
specially imported from Engbnd. 

The great Tower of the Chape 
which will dominate the Campus 
will have a large be'! of deep 
sonorous tone, in conjuj ction witl 
Westminster Chimes a n d a clocl 
with a single open bronre dial fac 
ing the West. 

it has been d'^vised by th( 
Architect to floodlight the Towe: 
after dark, with an arrangemen 
whereby, a few seconds before th( 
Chimes sound the quarters, th( 
Tower will be automatically flood' 
lighted and the lights automaticallj 
disconnected on the last stroke ol 
the great hour bell, with an arrange' 
ment also for continuous floodlight- 
ing on special occasions. 

The approach to the buildins 
from the West will be a mag- 
nificent one consisting of a broac 
avenue on the major axis of the 
campus, lined with trees and shrub- 
bery, and nearly two blocks long 
Preliminary work moving tree; 
preparatory to the construction oi 
the building will be done within the 
next few weeks by the College. 



All students, who wish to 
work on the Pikes Peak Nug- 
get staff, the Colorado Col- 
lege yearbook, should hand 
in their names and what type 
of work they wish to do in 
the Nugget box at the Ad- 
ministration building. 



THE TIGER 



WAR TURNED COLLEGE 
INTO MILITARY CAMP 



Gym Class Rolls Bandages; Ath- 
letes Tackle Dummies With Bay- 
onets; Discipline Exercised 



By Velma Rose 

It was the fall of 1918 at Colo- 
rado Colege. Every student was 
responding to the call for patriot- 
ism which was issued during t h e 
time of the preparation for the 
great World War. Ticknor and 
Cossitt Halls were being used a s 
barracks. Men, going to classes, 
marched in regular formation. No 
conversation was carried on be- 
tween the men and women. They 
sat in order in the class rooms. The 
campus had been turned into a stu- 
dent army training camp. 

Throughout the grounds, every 
activity of a military camp was dis- 
played. In place of football prac- 
tice in the stadium, men were 
marching in drills. Instead of he- 
roes of the squad tackling a dum- 
my, men charged it with drawn 
bayonets. 

Girls were excused from Gym 
classes to roll bandages and make 
hospital shirts. One of the traged- 
ies of the war was brought out vi- 
vidly when one of them, while 
wrapping bandages, discovered 
ground glass in the gauze. Every- 
where women were knitting and 
men were marching. 

All the men were held under the 
strictest discipline, and were not al- 
lowed to leave the campus. Daily 
one could see them seated in a line 
on the curb nearest Murray's wait- 
ing for a friend to bring a sandwich 
from across the street. 

That spring there was an early 
commencement, and the men went 
to war. Some entered the aviation, 
some infantry, some cavalry. Then 
came — reports of the A. E. F. foot- 
ball squad in which were some of 
our men. Later came more grue- 
some details. Stars showed men 
killed. C. C. grieved for these, but 
was filled with pride for the honor 
they brought. 

Then in 1919 came the flue epi- 
demic, a disease which first broke 
out among the men, but which 
spread rapidly. No women died. 
When one heard taps sounding over 
the campus, he knew that a m a n 
had died. 

In October of that fall, the col- 
lege closed and remained so until 
November. Upon returning, each 
student was quarantined for 48 
hours, to prevent a spread of the 
disease. 

Such was the conditions of Colo- 
rado College during those tragic 
years of 1918 and 1919. Imagine 
it and contrast it with the school of 
today. 



Mierow Welcomes Alumni Home 



I am glad to act once more as 
spokesman for the Faculty and 
Trustees in welcoming old friends 
back to our campus for the Colo- 
rado College Home-Coming celebra- 
tion. 

Mrs. Mierow and I hope that all 
graduates and former students of 
the College who can do so will stop 
in at 24 College Place for at least 
a few minutes after the game. 
Charles C. Mierow 

President. 



To the Alumni — 

Come back and renew old cam- 
pus friendships! The student body 
hopes that your stay on the campus 
may be the pleasantest, and we are 
planning to do everything in our 
power to make it so. 

Stewart G. Wilson, 

President, A. S. C. C. 



Parade Order, 
Line of March 
Is Announced 



Formation point — 

Cache la Poudre between Neva- 
da and Cascade. 

Time of departure — 
10:30 A. M. SHARP. 

Line of March — 

South along Nevada to Platte, 
West on Platte to Tejon, South 
on Tejon to Colorado, East on 
Colorado to Nevada, North on 
Nevada to Pikes Peak. Disband. 

Order— 

1 . Police 

2. C. C. Band 

3. Tiger Club 

4. Growler's Club 

5. Student body on foot 

6. Decorated private cars 

7. Floats 

(1) Phi Gamma Delta 

(2) Hypatia 

(3) Phi Delta Theta 

(4) Zetalethian 

(5) Beta Theta Pi 

(6) Minerva 

(7) Kappa Sigma 

(8) Crescent Club 

(9) Pi Kappa Alpha 

(10) Associated Women Stu- 

dents 

(11) Delta Alpha Phi 

(12) Contemporary 

(13) Sigma Chi 

(14) Question Club 

8. High School Band 

9. Colorado College Alumni 
Association Floats 

Judges of best decorated Floats and 
Houses — ■ 

( I ) Dean Fauteaux 

(2) Dean Lovitt 

(3) C. William Penland. 

(4) and (5) Mr. and Mrs. Paul 
Swan 

The floats will be judged along 
Tejon. The decorated houses will 
be decorated between II : 30-1 2:00 
A. M., and the same group judging 
both. 



Ruggles Of Yale Talks 
In Assembly Friday 



At a special assembly on Friday, 
November 15, at II :30 in Perkins 
Hall, Dt. Arthur H. Ruggles, lec- 
turer in Psychiatry at Yale will 
speak on "The Mental Hygiene of 
College Life". 

Members of the Faculty are cor- 
dially invited to attend and are 
urged to sit on the platform in or- 
der to leave room in the body of 
the house and in the gallery for 
visitors from the town. 

Particular attention is called to 
the fact that classes regularly 
scheduled for the fourth hour on 
Friday, November 15, will be held 
instead at the fourth hour on 
Thursday, November 14. 



Freshmen Women Must 
All Wear Green Caps 

All freshmen women must appear 
on the campus in green caps be- 
ginning October I . This does not 
mean carry them. One must wear 
them while on the campus from 
8:00 a. m. to 6:00 p. m., every day 
but Sunday. These caps can be 
obtained at Hausemen and McCalls, 
for $1.00 with a receipt. They can 
be obtained from either Margaret 
Rowe or Dorothy Garrett prior to 
October I. — Montana Weekly Ex- 
ponent. 



Wilm Writes Treatise 
On College Conditions 

"The College and Main Street," 
by E. C. Wilm, appears in The Na- 
tion for October 9. Dr. Wilm, who 
is chairman of the department of 
philosophy at Colorado College, al- 
ludes several times in his article to 
conditions existing in his institution. 
He suggests that trustees should 
"stiffen entrance requirments," 
"abolish intercollegiate athletics," 
"ab*li&h fraternities," and "abolish 
marking system." 

Several copies of the monograph 
are on file at the library. 



PAST HOMECOMING GAMES 
WERE REAL THRILLERS 



Writer Recalls Days Of Greiner, 

Schoonover, Bevan, Phelps, 

Brown, And Spicer 

By T. E. Nowels, Jr. 

In thinking over the Tiger pros- 
pects for a conference champion- 
ship and a victory over Utah Uni- 
versity here at the annual Home- 
coming clash on November 9, it 
might be well to glance back over 
the past few years and see the out- 
come. Although the homecoming 
game is usually played against 
Colorado University or Colorado 
Aggies, the game that we seem to 
be most interested in is that with 
the Red Devils. 

In 1923 on Washburn field, Colo- 
rado College defeated the Redskins 
in a close game 7-6 with Fran Mac- 
Dougall, Tiger speed expert running 
65 yards for a touchdown after 
nabbing a pass from Schoonover on 
the famous Tiger "spread play." 
The Utes because of two successful 
dropkicks by Captain Watkins in 
the first two periods, led until the 
last few minutes of play. Then the 
spectacular play by MacDougali 
and the successful try for point by 
Perry Greiner and the Utah team's 
hopes for a conference gonfalon 
went flying off into space. 

Nineteen twenty-four at Cum- 
mings field in Salt Lake City saw 
the underdog Tigers wallop the 
Utes by a 9-0 score and again blast 
the Red Devil's conference cham- 
pionship aspirations. A 32-yard 
drop-kick and a 65-yard run by Ir- 
vin "Doc" Hunter gave the Junga- 
leers their great surprise victory. 
Statistics of the game show that the 
Bengals outclassed the Utahites in 
every department of the game. 

The next year, 1925, the last 
time that Utah has played on Wash- 
burn field, saw just the reverse of 
the year before and a highly-touted 
Bengal eleven came out on the 
short end of a 20-0 score, having 
been hopelessly outclassed by 
Coach Ike Armstring's men. It was 
a pitiful sight to behold, and when 
statistics were compiled, the Tigers 
had scored only 21 yards from 
scrimmage. It so happened though, 
that Captain Al Brown and "Spic" 
Spicer were on the bench in that 
game with injuries. 

The Homecoming battle in 1926 
saw the Tigers wallop the socks off 
the team from Colorado University 
21-0. They did not play Utah at 
all that year. The game against 
Boulder will be remembered by the 
hidden-ball play in which "Little 
Nell" Bevan, diminutive backfield 
ace scooted across the goal-line on 

(Continued on page 11) 



THE TIGER 



Member of Rocky Mountain 

Inter-Collegriate Press 

Association 




The Colorado College 

Newspaper, 

Published Weekly by the 

Students. 



THE TIGER 



LLOYD H. ELLIS ...Main 1975 ...Editor 

James Keyser Associate Editor Barratt O'Hara Desk Editor 

Chauncey H. Blodgett, Jr Sport Editor Margaret Gillen Society Editor 



.Feature Editor Jolm W. 
REPORTERS 



Haussermann, Jr Lit. Editor 



Melba Adams 
William Baker 
Margery Barkley 
Art Baylis 
Arthur Bishop 
Carl Burke 



Marjorie Gilbert 
Frances Glau 
Clifford Goodson 
Marjorie Ferg-uson 
Wayne Campbell 
Effie Gilbert 
Marian MacMillan 



Marie ilagemeyer 
Wilmoth Harris 
Archie Hess 
Don Horton 
Hermina Kahn 
Fred Nichols 
T. E. Nowels 



Hartley Murray 
Velma Rose 
Ivan Schweninger 
Ralph Smith 
Kendrick Stone 
Tom Tate 
Clifford Vessey 



JAMES PATTERSON Main 2575 Manager 

Frank Dentan, Jr .....Advertising Manager 

Advertising — Hari-y Wood, Nelson Brown, Max Schmidt, Byron Whaley, Doc Gulick 
and Homer Bruce 

Merritt Ritter Circulation Manager 

Assistants — Glen Wade, Jack Fisher, Charlotte Pipkin, Elsie Winship, Marguerite 
Smith, Ruth Griffin and Margaretta Barr 



Articlea intended for publication should be left in the Tiger Box, on the first 
floor of Coburn library, by Wednesday noon. No unsigned contributions will be 
published. 



WELCOME ALUMNL 

Welcome alumni! We're glad to see you back, and we hope that 
you have the best Homecoming entertainment that any alumni has ever 
had. Enjoy every bit of your visit here. Meet the old and new fra- 
ternity brothers and society sisters. Watch the longest and prettiest 
parade ever staged. See the Colorado College Tigers give the Mor- 
mons a battle that they'll never forget. 

And lastly don't forget that Colorado College is glad to see you 
back even when it isn't Homecoming. Make a habit of coming back to 
Colorado College two or three times a year. You remember how nor- 
mal the College was doing Homecoming in your day? Come back to 
the school on some quiet week end, and take a look at the new men, 
have a talk with the officers of the college, and see how the college 
runs normally. We would like to see every one of you make any week- 
end a Homecoming whenever you can. November the ninth is the of- 
ficial Homecoming but the school is ready to greet you any and every 
day. 



JUST A THOUGHT. 

At the last regular meeting of the faculty, it was decided that in 
the future, November 1 I would be a regular holiday on the Colorado 
College calendar. How much does this mean to the students of Colo- 
rado College? Is is just another day like the fourth of July or the 
twenty-second of February which means a vacation from work or school? 

Eleven years ago, November 1 I meant a great deal to the students. 
Colorado College men had been sent to the front, and they had died 
there. Influenza cost many lives at the college. November 1 1 meant 
the conclusion of drills, discipline, bayonet drill, and brought demobli- 
zation. Men returned to college to go to classes. But some of them 
never did return. Of those we must think when we remember that on 
Monday there is no school. 



TIGER SPIRIT. 

One of the largest demonstrations ever put on for a Tiger team was 
given last Sunday evening when the Colorado College football team 
returned from Utah. It takes a good student body to cheer a losing 
team, and Colorado College came through with flying colors that eve- 
ning. Tiger supporters turned out en masse; the band was there to 
welcome the returning players. This one little incident is just a sample 
of what the enthusiasm has been this year. The student body has put 
larger conference schools to shame in its cheering section. The Growler 
Club has been revived with a bang, and their whole attitude is a hun- 
dred per cent better. The stunt of spelling their name with cardboards 
at the game should be commended. 

What about the Tiger Club? One hears much murmurings about 
their selection of members, their bickerings, and their meetings. Will 
they march out in the field with unbecoming sweat shirts on as usual — 
and sway back and forth to the music of "Our Colorado", or will they 
give a stunt which will make them compare favorably with some of the 
Rocky Mountain chapters of the "Spur", the national women's pep 
organization? 



BRITAIN'S STUDENT 
CHRISTIANS 



It is an open secret that the var- 
ious organizations which seek to 
carry on Christian work among 
students are having a hard time in 
almost every land. In England, 
the Student Christian movement 
has developed the following plat- 
form: 

"As a Christian movement we af- 
firm our faith in God, our Father, 
whose nature is creative love and 
power. 

"God is made known to us in 
Jesus Christ, in whom we see the 
true express of his being and t ih e 
true nature of man. 

"Through his life and trium- 
phant death, and through the liv- 
ing energy of the Spirit, we share 
in the redeeming love which over- 
comes evil, and we find forgive- 
ness, freedom, and eternal Hfe. 

"Faced with the need and per- 
plexity of the world, we desire to 
give ourselves to Christ, and to fol- 
low ,him wherever he may call us. 

"We seek the kingdom of God, 
the re-creation of all mankind into 
one family, without distinction o f 
race or nation, class or capacity. 

"We desire to enter into the fel- 
lowship of worship, thought and 
service which is the heritage of the 
Christian church." 



Hour Glass 



TWENTY YEARS AGO 

The Tiger carries an editorial 
from the Denver Post which extols 
the position held by Colorado Col- 
lege among the institutions of the 
West. 

With J. Sinton, Witherow, Acker, 
Reed, and Floyd back in school. 
Coach Rothgeb considered football 
prospects very good — for a cham- 
pionship team. 

Ellingwood, the Rhodes Scholar 
from Colorado, was tendered a re- 
ception before leaving for Oxford. 

The Phi Gamma Delta fraternity 
entertained the neighborhood Fri- 
day night with a brass band con- 
cert. 

The Tigers walloped the Terrors 
by a score of 22 to 0. 

Contemporary entertained her 
pledges with a "German" in Tich- 
nor study. 

Fraternities show spirit by pro- 
viding a training table for the foot- 
ball team a week at a time. 

The Tiger team rode to the sta- 
tion in a tally-ho drawn by the stu- 
dents of Colorado College. 

The Minerva's twenty-third reg- 
ular initiation occurred Friday, Oc- 
tober 28. 

The Kappa Sigma fraternity gave 
one of their most enjoyable dances 
last Saturday night. Fink's orches- 



A CYNICAL PORTRAIT 
OF UNDERGRADUATES 



The undergraduates of our pres- 
ent-day institutions of learning havt 
taken unto themselves a self-con- 
version into more or less blunder- 
ing iconoclasts. This colossal dis- 
turbance has upset the hitherto well- 
balanced undergraduate and sel 
them to leave off studying and tc 
devote themselves into loud and dis- 
maying railings at their teachers, a 
mockery of religion and morality 
and joyous nosefingerings at societj 
in general, and boys who wastec 
their time playing football. These 
adolescent revolutionists have as 
their geniuses such men as Paul 
Whiteman, Earnest Hemingway 
George Gershwin, and counties; 
others, including a few writers ol 
poetical cynicism, namely, Dorothj 
Parker and Samuel Hoffenstein; 
who seem to thrill them beyond con- 
ception by their rythmic blaring ol 
innumerable instruments; by theii 
unfearingly written prose, in which 
at least three "goddams" appear tc 
the page and inevitably a "Jesus"; 
and by their presumedly ingenious 
ability to make life seem like a 
movie title. 

Their national bird is not the 
eagle, but the cuckoo. They esteem 
not to be lawyers, doctors, or men 
of similar beneficial professions, but 
to the already over-crowded ranks 
of bond salesmen, cigarette en- 
dorsers, plain and fancy alcoholic 
imbibers, and all in all, good fel- 
lows. 

Amid all their haranguing ol 
their more peaceable classmates, 
the college conventions, and their 
untimely outbursts of enthusiasm, 
not one has given a rational, prac- 
ticable or original yell. Some have 
made themselves momentarily fell 
by their classmates and instructors, 
but have made practically no fav- 
orable impressions on their more 
nonchalant and unexcitable elders. 

The undergraduate of today is 
too much of a rebel of convention 
unmistakably counterfeit, becom- 
ing indignant to the more sane es- 
pirations that should be sought. 
They have plenty of time to be- 
come indignant later in life. 

Their motto seems to be-"To con- 
vention, inseperable my nose and 
thumb." — T. T. 



tra played, and punch and wafers 
were served all the evening. 

Delta Phi Theta held an enjoyable 
stag supper at Tucker's last Wed- 
nesday. 

"Tub" Morris, '09, who will be 
remembered as one of the strong- 
est football stars on the Tiger squad 
in recent years spent a few hours 
here on his way to Denver. 

Vandamoer was the "Dutch" 
Clark of Colorado College. 



THE TIGER 



W. I. Lucas 

HAS 

EVERYTHING IN 

SPORTING GOODS 
"Tigers always welcome" 

119 N. TejonSt. 
Main 900 



for hot, clean 

clinkerless fuel 

— call the "coal phone' 

M 5Z7 




[EW 
COAL/ 



JD 



Strachan's 
S\veet 
Shop 

Bijou and Nevada 

Try our Malts and Toasted 

Sandwiches 



CITY COAL 

15 East Pikes Peak Avenue 

Phone 

Main 67 or 120 



PLAZA 

DINING 
ROOM 

•The .Place to Eat" 

IJfeakfasl Luncheon 

Dinner 



SOCIETY 



The Phi Delta Theta tea dance, 
last Saturday afternoon was very 
popular. About fifty couples en- 
joyed listening to the Tiger-Utah 
Aggie game while terpsichoring. 
Among those present were Al 
Brown and Virginia Dewey, David 
Scott, Glenn Wade, Harriet Floyd, 
Martha Herbert, Lloyd Ellis and 
Melba Adams, Bruce Grey and 
Phyllis Ormsby, Gilbert Rice and 
Alyce Ireland, Clark Butterfield and 
Margaret Bradfield, Barratt O'Hara 
and Marian MacMillan, William 
Walters and Kay Poland, Ed Cass 
and Ruth Tom Frame, William 
Neumarker and Lorayne Deane, 
Jerry Cogan and Genevieve Engel, 
"Jelly" Fales and Beth Smith, 
Jam.es McElvaine and Priscilla 
Todd, Walter Knodel and Marian 
Coles, Don Haney, and T. E. Now- 
el!s, Flossye Harris a Delta Sig 
from Emporia teachers, and Bonnie 
Nolan, a Tri^-Delt from Kansas, 
Cc.me all the way to be there with 
"Doc" Gulick. Mrs. Haney and 
Mother Baker were chaperons. 

Complimenting their alumnae, 
members of the women's societies 
will be hostesses at breakfasts on 
Saturday, November 9 at 9 o'clock. 
Contemporary, Hypatia, and Min- 
erva will hold their breakfasts at 
the Antlers while Zetalethian will 
hold theirs at the Broadmoor. At 
six in the evening, the alumnae will 
be entertained by the active chap- 
ters at buffet suppers at the society 
houses. 

Beta Omega of Kappa Sigma en- 
tertained at the chapter house, Fri- 
day evening, Nov. 1. The house 
wai decorated with pumpkins and 
shocks of corn. Music was furn- 
ished by Coit's orchestra. The 
guests were:- Imogene Miller, Mary 
McConnell, Marie Benning, Kath- 
erine Herbert, Mary Gallagher, 
Elizabeth Skidmore, Fern DeFlon, 
Alice Aiken, Marian McMillan, 
Eleanor Watts, Alyce Ireland, Vir- 
inia Easton, Evelyn Stubblefield, 
Jean Horan, Helen Hummel, Betty 
Fuller, Alice Aaby, Margaret South- 
mayed, Phyllis Ormsby, Kay Poland 
Ruth McDonald, Genevieve Engle, 
Naomi Black, Jane Whitecraft, 
Margaret Bradfield, Virgina Love, 
Martha Keene, Ruth Frame , Al- 
berta J ones, Marjorie Gilbert, 
Helen Hultman, Grace Perkins, 
Marian Fee, Helen Elliott, Dorothy 
Frus, Dorothy McCrary, Lois Se- 
brch, Virginia Patterson, Dorothy 
Chamberlain. Emily Davidson, 
Genevieve Curry, Mrs. James Mc- 
Tigue, and Mrs. Arlington Beery. 
Dr. and Mrs. James G. McMurlry 
chaperoned the affair. 



Beta Theta Pi will entertain at a 
dance at the chapter house tonight. 

Contemporary society entertamed 
at tea, Saturday afternoon, Nov., 2, 
for the honorary members of the or- 
ganization. 



A tea dance was held at the Phi 
Delta Theta house, Saturday, Nov., 
2, Bob Shonsby's orchestra furnish- 
ed the music. A feature of the af- 
fair was a play-by-play account of 
the Tiger-Utah Aggies game, which 
was made possible by a special 
hook-up with the press wire. 

McGregor Hall Dance 

Girls living in McGregor Hall 
gave a Hallowe'en dance in t h e 
girls' gymnasium in the basement 
of McGregor Hall, Friday night, 
November I . Mrs. Louise Fau- 
teaux. Dean of Women at Colorado 
College, and Miss Amanda Ellis, 
House Director, chaperoned the af- 
fair. Girls present were, Harriet 
Floyd, Lillian Gibbs, Pat Johnson, 
Virginia Raywood, Eleanor Schaff, 
Mary Elizabeth Pitts, Melba Adams, 
Hermina Kahn, Marian Coles, Lo- 
rayne Dean, Mildred Kruse, Mar- 
garet Crissman, Gladys Johnston, 
Margaret McClelland, Mariana 
Sackett, Margaret Melis, Dorothy 
Underwood, Rebecca Todd, Irene 
Slane, Frances Villano, Ruth Ste- 
phens, Fredda Wootton, Wilmoth 
Harris, Priscilla Todd, Louise Sher- 
man, Frances Ward, and Mary Ag- 
nes Weherle. The guests included, 
James McCluskey, Raymond Fries, 
William Newmarker, Gale Middle- 
stetter, Lloyd Ellis, Max Schmidt, 
Loren Chaney, Walter Slocum, Don- 
ald Sevitz, William Bradshaw, 
Gene Randall, Ralph Smith, Max 
Ansell, Merritt Ritter, Edward Cass, 
Barratt O'Hara, Richard Grant, 
Charles Armstrong, James Craig, 
James McElvain, Robert Doyle, 
Walter Knodel, Marvin Rus- 
sell, Donald Horton, Henry Wersh- 
ing, Mark Perkinson, and Emra 
Butler. 



Mrs. Louise W. Fauteaux, dean 
of women, had as her guests at 
dinner, at Bemis ,hall last Monday 
evening, the members of the legisla- 
tive board of the Associated Women 
Students of Colorado college. The 
members of the board include 
Randalin Trippel, Virginia Dewey, 
Mary Strachan. Mary Gallagher, 
Grace Perkins, Lois Seebach, Helen 
Hageman, Elizabeth Sweetman, Jo 
Hildrich. Margaret Gillen, Mar- 
garetta Barr, Dorothy Stinger, Mar- 
jorie Ferguson, and Evelyn Stubble- 
field. 



HOLLY SUGAR 

is 
the Best 

Sugar the essential food. 

HOLLY SUGAR 
CORPORATION 



Q' 



[uality 

Cleaners and Dyers 

SUITS, O'COATS 

HATS $1.25 

U-Fone 1-8-1-1 We'll Call 

H. A. Thompson 
10 E. Kiowa 



DUTCH 

for touchdowns and DUTCH 
(Hammond) for new driver- 
less cars. 

New Fords 7c per mile; 
30c per hour. 

New Cheve Six's 8c per mile; 
35c per hour. 

Office 

ELK HOTEL 1 

Phones M. 346 and 2065 
Free Delivery 



WHY NOT 

Learn Typewriting 
while attending Col- 
lege? Your teachers 
will appreciate type- 
written work to be 
checked. We can ar- 
range hours to suit 
your convenience. 






8 



THE TIGER 



FRANK SARLAS & CO. 

Shoe Shining and Repairing 

Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Quick Service 

132 E. Pikes Peak 



AMERICA S.X 



Sun. Nov. 10 




IPSP)W 



Coming Thurs. Nov. 14th 

^^College Love 

Hot Tunes, Jazz, Pep, Cheers! 



ff 



BE 
POPULAR 




You're welcome anywhere in a 
Saunders System car. Drive one 
of our brand new Chryslers or 
Model A Fords on your next party 
or date. By sharing expenses two 
or more may have a fine large 
evening at small cost- Special low 
rates on long trips. 



Fords — Desotos — Chrysler! 
D. C. HUTCHINGS, Mgr. 
Phone Main 1800 
21 No. Cascadt 



LAUNDERS 



Yotirselfi 



SYSTEM 



Efficiency Engineer in Expose 
Shows Systemization of ^Cat' Quad 

By The Dowger 
My occupation is systematizing big business firms, and as a result 
when I heard of the complete synchnonization existing in certain parts 
of Colorado College, I thought that it might be of advantage to me to 
run up and have a look around. The publicity and advertising depart- 
ment especially attracted me so I visited the girls' halls. 

Never in all my life have I run across such perfect examples of 
system as those information and extraction bureaus. They are perfect. 
If you don't believe this just corae 
with me on a tour through one of 
these thought and promise record- 
ing laboratories. 

We drive the short last block at 
top speed, though we know well 
that there is little chance of us ap- 
proaching the plant without being 
subjected to a close scrutiny. For 
you must know that from the time 
the specimen comes in view of this 
uistitution until he turns the last 
corner and goes out of sight, that 
he is, figuratively speaking, on the 
table. 

We ring the entrance bell and a 
maid inquires our mission. Ac- 
companying her is the advance 
guard who skillfully greets us and 
has already ferreted out the reason 
of our visit from one of our unsus- 
pecting party. A cleverly placed 
telephone booth allows a confeder- 
ate to relay this information up- 
stairs. But in answer to our re- 
quest to see this marvelous organi- 
zation, the advance guard takes us 
now to the heart of the system. 
Here the vitals of the plant are 
laid open for us. 

The organization centers about 
a room in the middle, front, on th 
third floor. At the window stands 
the chief sentinel. From this posi- 
tion commending a view of the en- 
tire quad, she sings out reports, 
from time to time, much like t h e 
watch on shipboard. At a desk sits 
the chief dispatcher busily copying. 
Messengers loll about on the bed. 
Others are grouped about laugh- 
ing, and talking among themselves. 
But under it all is a state of con- 
stant expectancy. 

Before our guide can explain 
these objects to us, there is a shout 
from the lone watcher at the win- 
dow. A car, with headlights 
dimmed, has just entered the quad. 
Everything now is feverish activity. 
Quickly the guards are dispatched 
to their posts. But, alas, it is but 
a delivery car, the sentinel reports, 



Hulbert Edits Letter 

Of Utah Mail Agent 

The October Quarterly of the 
American Antiquarian Society con- 
tains an 80-page contribution "Let- 
ters of an Overland Mail Agent in 
Utah"; these are the letters of Hir- 
am S. Rumfield of the Overland 
Mail Company to his wife, written 
between 1860 and 1866 from Salt 
Lake City, edited, with an intro- 
duction, by Mr. Hulbert. No other 
collection of letters of an Overland 
Stage Coach agent is known to exist 
save these of Rumfield's. In addi- 
tion to giving a great deal of in- 
formation about our Overland bus- 
iness the letters contain interestin 
references to the Mormons and a 
verbatim report of an electrifying 
sermon by Brigham Young de- 
nouncing the aping of Gentile fash- 
ions in dress and drink by Mormon 
men and women. 



Bertrand Russell Kept 
Out Of Wisconsin Gym 

Dr. Walter Meanwell, University 
of Wisconsin basketball coach, likes 
philosophy, but not when it inter- 
feres with his favorite sport. 

The university auditorium com- 
mittee refused use of the gym- 
Uc-sium to Bertrand Russell, noted 
English philosopher for November 
20, because Dr. Meanwell said it 
would disrupt basketball practice. 
The campus philosophers have ap- 
pealed to President Glenn Frank. 



Gazette Entertains 

Journalism Class 



J. F. Lawson, instructor of Jour- 
nalism and city editor of the Colo- 
rado Springs Gazette, gave the 
journalism class an opportunity to 
see how a modern newspaper is 
written and printed at the Gazette 
offices on Wednesday and Thurs- 
day evening. 

Frank Foster, mechanical super- 
intendent took the class through 
the plant, and explained the me- 
chanical features of the paper. The 
work of the linotype, the making 
of mats, the casting, the making of 
heads, and make-up of the news- 
paper was discussed. 



for a good watcher must know 
car as far as she can see it. The 
reporter announces that it brought 
flowers for Miss X from Mr. Z pre- 
sumably for the dance tonight. 
Some discussion is the result of this 
announcement but it is not con- 
sidered a wholesale "scoop" as i t 
were. 

(Continued on page 11) 



REX HOTEL 

Colorado Springs 



The Colorado Planing 
Mill Co. 

MILL WORK OF ALL 
DESCRIPTIONS 

PADDLES 
Frank Mitchell, Manager 

Rhone 2876-W 
525 W. Colorado Ave. 
Colorado Sprmgs, Colo. 



PAUDRE-PAUFFE 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Permanent Fmger and Watei 

Waving 

Manicure and Scalp Treatment? 

Marcels 50c. 



H 



OWARD'S 

BARBER 
SHOP 



19 East Bijou Street 




GARAGE TIRE SERVICE 

CORDUROY CORDS 

Sidewall Protection 



When you consider that yon 
can purchase any make type- 
writer on moathly paymenb 
as small as $5.00 it is not a 
question of affording it 

The essentisil question is if 
you can afford to be without 
one. 



T-^ 




125 N. Tejon 



Main 95 



THE TIGER 



COVERS 
ALL THE FIELD 



SPORTS 



FOOTBALL 
CROSS COUNTRY EQUITATION 



Tigers are All 
In Shape to 
Trounce Utah 



Bear stories, eminating from the 
Tiger's lair during the first of this 
week, did not sound overly en- 
couraging as to the physical condi- 
tion of the Tiger men for their big- 
gest game. Since then, these have 
been lessened to a degree that puts 
a brighter outlook on the game 
than was given it previously. 

True, there were several badly 
banged boys after the game vAth 
the Utah Aggie crew last week, but 
mrny of these injuries were of the 
type that straighten themselves out 
in a few days. 

Wednesday night found the 
whole squad intact, with the few 
that had been on the sidelines for 
the first few days, in uniform 
again, and out after some redskin 
meat. 

Hayden, stocky guard, got a bad- 
ly wrenched ankle out of the en- 
counter, but it rallied during t h e 
short rest that he gave it this weeTc, 
and he is ready to go tomorrow. 

Cogan, wingman, received a 
broken nose but it will not keep 
him from answering the call if he 
is needed. Heter, another end man, 
also drew a sprained ankle, but he 
has been in uniform for the last 
three nights, and it is not thought 
thrt it will cramp his style against 
the Utes. 

Ingraham, who has been bother- 
ed with his knee since last year's 
Aggie game, has been nursing it 
this week pretty carefully, since it 
took a heavy beating against 
Utah's Aggies. He is expected to 
have it b?.ck in shape, however, 
and his ball toting and pass snag- 
ging will be one of the features of 
the game from all indications. 

Gloom throwers that have been 
crying their eyes out over the con- 
dition of the Bengals, will have to 
find another field, if Wednesday's 
practice schedule, and the dis- 
played spirit are indications. 



Twelve Senior Men 

Pledge Red Lantern 

The following men were elected 
to Red Lantern, the senior men's 
honorary organization: Harry 
Blunl, Milton Sprenger, Stewart 
WiLson, Harold Harmon, Earl Clark, 
John Cogan. William Jaillite, Mar- 
ion Weaver, James Weir, Ed Par- 
ker, Tommy Jones, and Paul Ves- 
tal. 



UTAH BACKERS PLAN BIG 
PEP CELEBRATION 



Utah will not lack their local 
supporters when they invade the 
Bengal lair for their annual grid- 
iron classic, for the alumni of the 
Salt Lake school already are plan- 
ning a huge pep meeting and 
luncheon. 



Fraternities Announce 

Initiation For Seven 



Colorado Beta of Phi Delta The- 
tp has c.nnounced the initiation of 
William Neumarker, Clark Butter- 
f e!d, Thomas Tate, and Kendrick 
Stone. 

The ceremony was followed by 
an initiation banquet held at t h e 
Plaza Hotel. 



The fraternity of Beta fheta Pi 
announces the initiation of John 
Harry Mathieson. 

Kenneth Rankin and Homer 
Bruce were initiated by the Sigma 
Chi fraternity on Sunday, Novem- 
ber 2. 



D. U. President Has 
Set Consultation Hours 



Denver— R. M. L P. A.— Dale 
King, president of the D. U. student 
body, has set office house when he 
will be available for consultation 
and to transact business. He can 
be found at the student association 
office on Tuesdays from 1 p. m. to 
2:30 p. m. and on Wednesdays 
from 2:30 to 3:30. 



MODERN WOMEN FORGETS 
LOVE AND ROMANCE 



Love rnd romance are things of 
the past to the modern college 
womrn. This was indicated when 
out of forty manuscripts submitted 
to Scribblers, honorary writer's 
at the Colorado Woman's College, 
only two dealt with the "tender 
passion." The majority of the girls 
wrote tragic stories or philosophic- 
al and scientific treatises. 



Professor W. Lewis Abbott, of 
the Sociology Department, will ad- 
dress an opening meeting of t h e 
Grace church women's auxiliary at 
the Grace church parish house on 
Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Pro- 
fessor Abbott's subject will be 
"Lawlessness." 



KAPPA SIGMA LEAD 

INTRAMURAL SPORTS 



All of the major events, with the 
exception of the tennis singles, in 
the Interfraternity contests have 
been completed. Altho no date has 
yet been set, the intra-mural swim- 
ming meet will be held in the near 
future and the results of this com- 
petion will have a great deal to do 
with the final outcome of the fall 
athletic program. 

Phi Gamma Delta won the tennis 
doubles when Cogan and Murray 
defeated the Kappa Sigma team, 
Blodgett and James, 6-1, 6-2. 
Brandborg, Kappa Sig, will meet 
Murray, Phi Gam, for the singles 
crown in tennis. Slocum of Sigma 
Chi won the singles title in horse- 
shoes by out pitching the Phi Delt 
star, Ryerson. Rea and Hill won 
the doubles crown in barnyard golf 
by downing the Independent duo. 
Mason and Cook. Rea defeated 
Starbuck to win the consolation 
flight in horseshoes for the Kappa 
Sigmas. 

The point score thus far: 

Kappa Sigma— 1000 (The Kap- 
pa Sig total will be increased by 
either 300 or 500 points depending 
on the outcome of the final tennis 
match) . 

Phi Gamma Delta — 500 (Phi 
Gam's total will also be increased 
according to the outcome of the 
tennis match). 

Sigma Chi— 500. 

Phi Delta Theta— 300. 

Independents — 300. 



Hundred Given Work 

By College Bureau 

Student employment is, accord- 
ing to Roland Anderson, student 
manager, progressing very satisfac- 
torily with a large number of jobs 
and plenty of men to fill them. 

The present system of student 
employment has been in force in 
Colorado College for many years, 
and has always given satisfactory 
results in the line of finding work 
for college men. In the fall t h e 
manager gets a list of all the firms 
who vntII have open positions dur- 
ing the school term. These are 
tabulated; as men are seeded the 
manager notifies applicants, and 
the jobs are filled. Most of t h e 
jobs are for board or room not 
many being cash. 

To date, the agency has given 
out and filled more than one hun- 
dred requests. 



Former Player Gives 
Great Tribute To Clark 



Celsus Link, well known alumnus 
of Colorado College, has framed 
the herdline of the Denver Post of 
Sunday morning, October 20, 
which reads 
" 'DUTCH' CLARK, A FIRST 

CLASS MAN 
BEATS DENVER, A FIRST 

CLASS TEAM" 
and has sent two copies to Colorado 
Springs. One copy is for the tro- 
phy room at Cossitt Hall, and the 
other copy is for "Dutch". 

On the back of the frame is the 
following letter: 
To Dear Old 

Colorado College 

And to "Dutch" Clark 
In honor and memory of the 
greatest football player that Colo- 
rado h?,s ever produced — I present 
this — the finest tribute I've ever 
known paid to a football player. 
From 

Celsus Link 
Who played behind the line for 
"C. C." in 1889, 1890, 1891. 
Denver, Colo. 
Oct. 22, 1929. 



ASSEMBLY BURIES UTE 
IN FORMAL EXERCISES 



The regular monthly compulsory 
student assembly was held Thurs- 
day morning. It was announced 
that a concert given by Colorado 
College men and women will be pre- 
sented on November 21. 

Dean Hale announced that t h e 
City Concert Series ought to draw 
a number of students this year as 
the prices are exceptionally reason- 
able, and it will be one of the best 
in the country. 

Charles Simon, assistant track 
coFch, awarded the individual med- 
als, the Individual cup, and the In- 
terfraternity trophy given for t h e 
winners of the cross-country. Jack 
Kintz won first place, and the Kap- 
pa Sigma fraternity won the team 
cup. 

The remainder of the hour was 
spent in burying the Utes and in 
arousing Tiger Spirit. At this time. 
Wade commended the student body 
for their good turnout when t h e 
Tigers returned last Sunday. Har- 
old Harmon officiated as preacher 
and gave Utah a fitting funeral. It 
was finally promised that the fuse 
would be blown out of "Power- 
house" Pomeroy, and the Tigers 
will not let the "Ute Pass." 



10 



THE TIGER 




For school and sports wear or for more for- 
mal evening wear you may at all times expect 
to find at "COX BROS." the newest patterns 
and materials in footwear — And at prices you 
expect to pay. 

Cox Bros. Shoe Co. 



Quality 



ervice 




Phone 

356 



19 E. Cucharras St. 



Phone 
356 



Christmas Cards in Almost 
Inconceivable Variety 

As usual, those who appreciate and want the outstand- 
ing and newer designs in Christmas Greeting Cards already 
are stopping at the Out West to look over the offerings. 

Our "Christmas Nook" is a new convenience for se- 
lecting cards leisurely and in comfort. You'll appreciate 
the quality, either in the single cards or in the groups for 
personal imprinting. 



'T'HREE styles of im- 
■*■ printing are avail- 
able — m new type faces, 
in raised printing and in 
die stamping. There's 
plenty of time now to or- 
der new plates, if you 
wish. 



Printing 6- 
Sx^noNEiorQii 

Oriorado Springs CMa 



PLAY TO BE PRESENTED 
BY KOSHARE NEXT WEEK 



Koshare's first production of the 
year is to be Ibsen's "Wild Duck", 
directed by Mr. Arthur Sharp. The 
characters in the play, among which 
are several difficult roles, are being 
handled by a competent cast. 

Hialmar is convincing in his 
vv'eakness and grandiloquent tirades 
which are ended not even by death. 
The bombastic love of a father for 
his child, which is heightened by 
her death, remains bombastic. 

Gina, the loving, domestic wife 
of Hialmar, is frightened blindly 
against the overpoyering sentimen- 
tality of Gregers and Hialmar, and 
is aided by the gone-to-seed Dr. 
Relling who realizes Hialmar's 
weakness, and the dangers of Greg- 
er's "ideals". 

Sedvig, the child, piteous in her 
ignorance of approaching doom, is 
unwittingly the instrument of t h e 
zealot Gregors who is entirely ab- 
sorbed by ,his self-composed 
"claims of the ideal". 

Old Ekdal furnishes a back- 
ground of pathos in his tottering 
senility and his now chinging ser- 
vilness, and agamst whose back- 
ground of defeat the present strug- 
gle is fought. 

The set for the play is bemg con- 
structed by Mr. Sharp, assisted by 
Kenneth Peterson, Gene Lague and 
Art Bisihop, and they have succeed- 
ed is using more of the Cogswell 
stage than has even been available 
before. A pleasing bit of visionary 
deception has been devised to in- 
dicate the garret which plays such 
an important part in the develop- 
ment of the plot. Miss Suzanne 
Walker, the property manager, has 
gathered together a number of 
'props' which will give the set an 
atmosphere of realistic .home life 
suitable to the position indicated by 
the plajrwrite. 

"The Wild Duck" will be pre- 
sented on Friday and Saturday 
evenings November 15 and 16. On 
Friday the performance will begin 
at 8:15. On Saturday evening, be- 
cause of a number of social events 
which are taking place, the per- 
formance will begin at 7:15. The 
early hour will allow members o f 
the student body who had planned 
to attend other events to be pres- 
ent at the production of the "Wild 
Duck" with no inconvenience. Pro- 
ducing the play on two nights 
makes it possible to sell only t h e 
choice seats of the theatre. 

Koshare plans for the year a se- 
ries of worth while dramas and it 
hopes that this first production 
will be well attended and feels con- 
fident that those who give them- 
selves this pleasure will be amply 
repaid. 



The Ice Cream 
that's a C. C. 
"Institution" 

The between Class "Cones", 
t h e sandwich materials and 
candy, the ice creams and ices 
for class and club functions. 

From Frosh to Grad it's t h e 
place every Tiger knows. 

MoWRY'S 

Across from Campus 

Main 1183, 1184 



flnbesttucto 

has the Proper Luggage — 

For the week end trips — 
over-nite cases, fitted bags, 
and small hand luggage. 

WARDROBE 

TRUNKS 



INDESTRUCTO 
LUGGAGE SHOP 

I4N. Tejon M. 250 




Can the Tigers 
Kick Over 

the 

Dope Bucket 

? 

We'll Say They 

Can 

And How ! 

See our wmdows 
this week 

"Trade with the Boys' 




Pikes Peak at Nevada 



THE TIGER 



11 



CHOCOLATES 
Good as Made 

Box Goods a Specialty 
WALLACE CANDY COMPANY 



To acquaint the public with the new 

GOLDEN CYCLE SHINE PARLOR 

We are offering a First Class 

SHINE FOR 5c 

By Presenting this Coupon 

(Todd) COLBERT BROS. (John) 

Lobby of the Golden Cycle Bldg. 

Tejon and Pikes Peak Avenue 



Couture's 

French Cleaning and Dyeing Co. 

Phones 1288-1289 
218 N. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 



Clintons 



Pure Milk 



Under New Management 

The College 
Barber Shop 

Ralph Schildknecht, Proprietor 

103 E. Cache laPoudre 
Colorado Springs 



PLAZA HOTEL BEAUTY SHOP 
Finger wave — Marcels 

Permanent Waves 

Phone Main 2515 



Women Efficient 
At Watching Men 

(Continued from page 8) 

However we have not long to 
wail before some real information 
is forthcoming. Another car drives 
up and two gentlemen alight. The 
system is now producing under its 
peak load. 

From the reporter comes the 
news of who these men are, whom 
they come for, what they are going 
to do this evening , how they are 
dressed, and all the other little de- 
tails down to the perfume the use. 
With the news of the details in hand 
the dispatcher makes a number of 
copies. By special messenger these 
reports are sent to all the other halls 
and to each floor of this building. 
In fact the dates themselves wait for 
these reports like the weather warn- 
ings so that they may know what to 
wear this evening. Long before the 
car starts out of the drive the fate 
of its occupants, for that evening, 
has been definitely fixed. 

Later we are shown the files kept 
by the organization, which make it 
possible to turn back many years 
and find out anything about a per- 
son. Along this same line, we are 
told that there is a special branch 
of the service whose duty it is to 
keep in touch with the other ihalls 
and thus carry on an exchange serv- 
ice with them. This is made pos- 
sible by that great service, the A. 
C. C. of C. C. or the Associated Cat 
Club of Colorado College. 

In talking over this system, my 
friend, who is a multiplex operator, 
confided to me that his little mach- 
ine was a total loss besides this sys- 
tem, as his invention could print 
only what it received and could not 
elaborate on the subject matter. 

"You know," he said, "the theme 
song of that group should be that 
song that goes, 'Its over, all over' 
for if it isn't it will be soon. 



UTAH AGGIES HAND C. C. 
SEASON'S FIRST DEFEAT 

rn»>nt,iniu'rl from page 3) 

might be exhausted, as Heter came 
out with an ankle injury, Cogan 
hr.d to quit at the half with a brok- 
en nose, and Reid developed a limp 
which perceptibly slowed his hard 
charging game. Don Warning had 
not seen much service this season 
until this game, but showed an ad- 
eptness at eluding interference to 
break up jjlays in the hatching that 
even surprised his teammates. 

Two drives of the Tigers prom- 
ised well, but were checked in 
time: in the second quarter Clark 
ran over the Farmer line for sixty 
yards in eight plays, and was on 



CLOSE SCORES FEATURE 
PAST HOMECOMING GAMES 



(Continued from page 5) 

a hidden ball play to start the 
scoring. From then on. State's 
gridders were snowed under the Ti- 
ger avalanche and when the final 
gun had sounded, the score was 21- 
in favor of the Jungle Cats. 

Montana State College proved 
Tiger meat in the next year's Home- 
coming tussle, the final count being 
28-7. Colorado College scored 14 
first downs to 9 by the Bobcats. 
The individual Tiger stars were 
"Galloping Galoop" Clark, the two 
Phelps brothers and Putman, giant 
Tiger center. "Dutch" scored two 
of the Tiger touchdowns, and Field 
Phelps the other two, his "educated 
toe" being responsible for the four 
extra points. "Fat" Phelps made 
innumerable yards from scrimmage 
that day in bucking the Bobcat for- 
ward wall. Chez was the Bobcat 
star. 

Last year's C. C.-Utah Univer- 
sity game will never be forgotten 
by those who saw it. The Bengals, 
led by their All-American back, the 
Flying Dutchman, were in the lead 
21-7 when the first .half was over, 
having outclassed the Red Devils 
badly. But reserve power and su- 
perior weight began to tell in the 
second half and the Bengals saw 
victory slip from their hands in the 
final minutes, when Utah put over 
a driving touchdown to win 27-21. 
It was a heart-breaking game to 
watch, but spectators will tell you 
that the Tigers Sihould have been 
the winners. 



THE BAND OF BANDS 



Don't forget, at the next game 
to give the musical rooters of C. C. 
a great big hand in approval of 
their good work. 

Unanimous credit should be given 
these men who have been together 
for so short a time. A band of this 
sort gives to the college a touch of 
color needed to enliven the spirit 
of all concerned. They played "Our 
Colorado" in the noblest fashion. 
Let's get behind the Band and give 
them our utmost support. 



the three yard line with three plays 
to make goal, when an unfortunate 
penally of fifteen yards for us 
stopped the march once for 
all; again in the last quarter five 
first downs were made in a row, 
but the opposition tightened at the 
ten-yard mark. The Aggie touch- 
down was scored on a series of 
passes unsolved by our backs, and 
several costly run-backs were made 
of punts by the oily Call. 



"Better Equipped Than Ever 
To Handle College Trade." 



CAMPBELL'S 

BARBER SHOP 

109 East Pikes Peak Avenue 



Broken Lenses Duplicated 

Save the Pieces 

Eyes examined Lenses Ground 




THE LAUTERMAN-DUGAN 

JEWELRY AND OPTICAL CO. 

Jewelers, Optometrists and 

Mfg. Opticians 

Fine Watch, Clock and Jewelry 

Repairing 
121 N. Tejon St. Rhone Main 674 



"You're Sure They're Pure" 

Derngood Creole 
Squares, 35c lb. 

A pleasing variation of 
popular plantation 
Slick, the golden color 
appropriate to Home 
Coming. The feature 
for Saturday, the 9th. 

26 S. Tejon DCm'S 



THE 

WHITE WAY 

SYSTEM 

Open Until 2 A. M. 

Try our delicious White 
Way Chili 

Snappy Curb Service 

1 1 N. Tejon St. 



This week's Candy Special 

35c lb. 



Bitter 
Sweets 



BartherS 

Tejon Street at 
Acacia Park Comer 



12 



THE TIGER 



LOOK YOURBEST 

Have your hair cut in the 
approved manner. 

Pete's Barber Shop 

8 E. Cucharras St. 



Here's Your 

VICTOR 
RECORD 



Headquarters Come in and hear 

for the latest releases in 

our ventilated trial 
rooms. 




RADIO 

Victor, Majestic 

Freed, Atwater 

Kent and 

Crosley 

113-115 N. Tcjon 



jtpGGrloss 




lOTHE 
CAME 



in a Saunders System car, and take 
a gang of rooters with you. Make 
'em kick in for a share of the ex- 
pense and all travel for less than 
railway fare. Ask about low long 
trip rates on Model A Fords and 
new Chryslers. 



D. C. Hutchings, Mgr, 

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 

Phone Main 1800 

21 No. Cascade Ave. 



5AUNDERS 



[Drive It Yourself] 



SYSTEM 



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E. L. Bruce 

BARBER SHOP 

28 E. Kiowa 



Literary 



CRUCIFIX 

By EMONDILLE 

CRITICAL NOTE: Emondille's poem. Crucifix, has an artistic trend 
of retrospection, coupled with the delicacy suggestive phrases that are 
almost flavored with philosophical bits of orientalism, yet hold to the 
subject matter of the Western. — ^John W. Haussermann, Jr. 

I stood before the Mission 

Cold, devout, secure in the silent sunshine of today 
Watching the birds fly through the belfry; 
Listening to the bell's hourly toll. 

A decade before: I rein my horse before the gateway. 

Descend, and pass within. 

On the bare wall is a crucifix — in the pews 

Two devout ones mourning. 

I am surrounded by my faith : 

The sunshine is mine. 

I ride away happily. 

Eons, perhaps, before, 

I crouched in sunshine warm and timely, 

A drum beats: it arouses a pulse within me. 

I know I live; life means the breath within me — 

I dream 

The bell tolls. ..One! 

A pallid stone within, feigning warmth 

Responds in its coldness 

To the birds in the belfry . . . 

The moss against the crumbling wall 

Crumbling, as I am 

I walk away, my stick beating the gravel. 

And I climb into my motor. 

Over the next hill — what? 

Only another bell tolling. 



Forestry Club Meets To 
Eat Cider And Donuts 



The October meeting of the 
Pike's Peak Forestry Club was held 
at the home of Professor Gordon 
Parker. Professor Parker has made 
this meeting an annual affair, and 
it is always well attended as could 
be readily seen by the fine turnout 
at this meeting. Forester Kase, this 
year's leader of the Foresters pre- 
sided. The meeting was an infor- 
mal discussion of the equipment 
needed by the out-door man, par- 
ticularly the Forester. During this 
discussion dues were paid and 
plans were made for a hike. Every 
one is looking forward to the Club's 
annual climing of the Peak some 
time this winter. To top off a fine 
get-together Professor Parker 
treated to cider and doughnuts, 
which it can be assured was 
put away in large quantities. This 
may have been an inducement to 
attend the meeting but we hope 
that it also wdll serve as a reminder 
that there are many good meetings 
and wonderful times to be had by 
the Colorado College Foresters in 
the future. 



Record Crowd Will Pack 
Washburn Saturday 



A record-breaking crowd is ex- 
pected to attend the Utah-C. C. 
football game. The previous high 
mark in attendance at Washburn 
field was about 9,000 people at the 
Colorado Aggie-Bengal game in 
1927. It is believed that Saturday's 
game will establish the first 10,000 
gate in Colorado Springs. In order 
to give the crowd, a play by play 
account, a Western Electric public 
address system will be installed at 
the field. Every play, penalty and 
technical point of the game will be 
announced to the crowd. In order to 
make room for the press represen- 
tatives of the Colorado and Utah 
papers, an addition has been made 
to the press box. 



The Denver & Rio Grande Rail- 
road Co. announced on Wednesday 
that a special train will be operated 
from Denver to Colorado Springs 
for the services of those who wish 
to attend the Utah-C. C. football 
game. The trains will take the 
passengers directly to the stadium. 



The Trip that Bankrupts the 
English Language 

CORLEY 

Mt. Highway 

Cripple Creek in high gear 



T. J. Collier T. M. Collier 

V. L. Collier 

TheCOLUER 

LUMBER CO. 

Phone Main 386 
543 W. Colorado Ave. 



CADILLAC 

and 

CHRYSLER 

MOTORCARS 

Adams Motor Co. 

Marksheffel Building 



Go To 

Miller Music ep. 

"Where Music Is Sweetest" 
13 North Tejon Street 
for Records and Music 

GEORGE L. MILLER. Prop. 



You may save with this Associa- 
tion, any amount from one dollar 
up per week or month. 

We invite college students to call 
at our office (Ground floor loca- 
tion) I 16 North Tejon Street, Colo- 
rado Springs. 

E. C. SHAKLR. President 
I 16 North Tejon Street 



Photographs of our Colorado 
mountains. Nicely made — 
attractively colored by hand. 
Moderate in price — framed 
or unframed. 

H. L. STANDLEY 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No, Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs 



THE TIGER 



13 



Official Notices 



MONDAY A HOLIDAY 

It was voted at the faculty meet- 
ing on Friday, November 1, that 
in the future Armistice Day will be 
a holiday at Colorado College, and 
in the succeeding years, that t h e 
date be made permanent in the 
Colorado College calendar. 

Attendance is required at the 
Freshmen Health Lectures. Two 
cuts will be allowed. Those who 
take more than two cuts will be re- 
quired to pass a stiff examination 
in order to work off this require- 
ment. 

Those who fail to pass this ex- 
amination will receive an Incom- 
plete in all Physical Education work 
until this Incomplete is removed. 
The incomplete becomes a failure 
unless removed within a year. 

Those who are absent from a 
lecture and have a legitimate ex- 
cuse should see Dr. Bortree before 
the next lecture. 

Those who ,have taken three or 
more cuts to date should consult 
Dr. Bortree at once. 



All girls interested in Eagerheart 
will please meet in Cogswell the- 
atre next Wednesday at 4:30. Any 
girl is eligible to try out for the 
play. 



"A NIGHT IN AN INN" 
TO BE GIVEN SATURDAY 



Koshare's contribution to the 
Homecoming activities will be the 
presentation of Dunsany's "A Night 
in an Inn" on Saturday evening in 
Cogswell theatre. Mr. Arthur 
Sharp is directing the play. The 
rclion takes place in an old a- 
banded inn where a band of thieves 
have been in hiding for three days. 
They have stolen a ruby from the 
eye of an idol, since which time two 
of their band have heard the voice 
of the idol and have never returned. 
The suspense and quiet in which 
the remaining four men are kept 
is terrible, — they would rather al- 
most anything would happen than 
endure it — and it does! 

The parts of the thieves are taken 
by: 

Harold C. Harmon The Toff 

Arthur Bishop Bill 

Trellyan Nowels Sniggers 

Kenneth Reuken Albert 

The rest of the cast is made up 
by David Moffat, and Gene Lague, 
Lyman DeGeer, and Marien Russell 
who are priests of the idol. 



TIGER-DENVER FROSH 
BAniE TO EVEN DRAW 



Mud ■ — fumbles — and another 
scoreless tie — that's the story of the 
Tiger-Pioneer Frosh encounter last 
Friday. The crimson and gold elev- 
en, playing on their home field, 
fought through of an hour of soggy 
football to get the breaks that came 
along and to hold a C. C. Fresh- 
man team scoreless for the first 
time in four years. Threatening the 
Pioneer goal line in the second 
quarter and again in the third, the 
Vandenberg-Rossener eleven made 
a game of it, and on defense beat 
into the mud any attempt to score 
that the Queen City boys made. 

The line up: Left end, Rahm, 
Jones; left tackle, Roark; left 
guard, Beattie; center, Ryan; right 
guard, McClurg, Moffatt; right tac- 
kle, Wiedman; right end; Stillman, 
Hall; and in the backfield. Captain 
Schnurr, Bradshaw, Schweninger, 
Owens, Chestnolvich, Butterfield 
and De Holtzer. 

Monday, the Tiger Frosh journey 
to Gunnison for a Armistice Day 
game with the Western State Frosh. 



Democrats And Sunday 
Movies Win In Election 



Boulder students may now pro- 
cede from the church services to 
the cinema attraction, according to 
the decision of the electorate at the 
Dolls last Tuesday. The present 
Sunday blue laws were repealed. 
The same decision was also made 
by the voters of Monte Vista. 

Other elections resulted in t h e 
Democrats securing the governor- 
ship of Virginia, the mayors of 
New York and Boston, the state 
senate and the majority of the 
house in Kentucky, the congress- 
man from the twenty-first New York 
district, and the majority of t h e 
iudgships in Chicago. 



Students Join Team In 
Trip to Utah Aggies 

As students had to miss school to 
go to the Utah, only a few braved 
the trip. Included in this number, 
James Keyser, Whitney Sutton, 
William Van Dyke, and Henry 
Smith went on the train; Ed Bur- 
no. George Robinson, Art Kelly, 
and Bill Leslie drove through by 
automobile. 



Faced with a threat of expulsion, 
or other punishment, more than 50 
students of the University of Utah- 
led by Elton W. Pace, student body 
president, prepared to leave on a 
special train today for Colorado 
Springs to attend the Utah-Colorado 
college football game. 



PiGGLY&WlGGLY 



ALL OVER THE WORLD 

FIVE BUSY STORES IN 

COLORADO SPRINGS 



FOR PLUMBING AND HEATING WORK 

Phone BUMSTEAD'S ^^7 

"Where Your Dollars Have More Cents" 



Your Own Photograph Made to your liking IN a Handsome 
Frame — Any Price you choose to pay. 

Exclusive photographers for the Pikes Peak NuggeL 

Wagfner-Fults Studio 

Bums Bldg. 



Pho,ae Main 4671 



831 North Tejon 



A. L. STARK 

TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 

COLORADO SPRINGS 



Shopping 

Satisfaction 

Always at 



Pe 



Nn 



J.C. 

c@. 1 ^E 

Builders of 

Good Will 



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14 



THE TIGER 




S er vices f o r your 
car that includes 

Proper Lubrication 

100% Alemite 

LEADING MOTOR OILS 

Weaverized Washing 

Tire Repairing Road Service 

Drive in Today 



FIRESTONE TIRES 
117 N. Nevada Phone M. 202 



IkOMW^ 



TENT £.' AWNING CO 



Awnings and Camp Supplies 



Frank Geddy Says- 
Welcome back or Grads! 
SCALP THE UTES 
EAT 'EM UP TIGERS 

The Shoe Shop 

Across from the High School 



REX HOTEL 

Colorado Springs 



At the Game buy 

CARNATIONS 

from 

THE CONTEMPS 



HUGHES' 
CHOCOLATES 

Try our Saturday 
SPECIALS 



Personals 



Colorado college students who at- 
tended the dinner dance at the 
Broadmoor hotel, last Saturday 
night included Constance Post- 
lethwaite, Betty Crannell, Glen 
Wade, Max Keyte, T. E. Nowels, 
Jr., and Chauncey Blodgett. 

"Bill" Copeland has returned to 
his work as secretary of the college 
following an appendicitis opera- 
tion. 

One of a series of weekly teas 
given by Dean Fauteaux for Fresh- 
men and new girls was held Friday 
afternoon. Dean Fauteaux hopes 
by means of these teas to become 
better acquainted with the women 
of the college. 



Loan Funds Returned To 
Association By Students 

Former students of Colorado Col- 
lege, who were helped by loans 
made from various funds for the 
purpose this year, have paid back, 
in principal and interest, $1,062.12 
according to a report made at the 
Women's Educational Society of 
the college, which met in Bemis 
Hall. 

It was also announced that the 
immediate task of the society had 
been to raise the scholarship prin- 
cipal funds, as rates of interest have 
been decreasing. In the last year 
and a half the Mabel Wiley Loud 
fund has been increased by $100, 
the W. F. Richards fund, by $200, 
and the Mary G. Slocum fund by 
$150. The William D. Quack- 
enburh loan fund of $2,000 held 
by the college, has been changed 
to a scholarship fund. The Marie 
Sahm lecture fund will be near the 
$500 mark by January 1 . 

There were 110 members and 
guests at the meeting. After the 
luncheon, the company adjourned 
to the commons room where the 
annual reports were read. The 
business was followed by an address 
by Rev. W. G. Schaefer on "The 
Fishes of the Tropics." 



Miss Helen Tufts, who for the 
past three weeks has been at Colo- 
rado College in connection with 
the Vocational Guidance program, 
has returned to Denver. She is 
compiling statistics in regard to the 
various vocational interests of 
Freshmen women. This information 
will be published in the Tiger next 
semester. 

Next semester, lectures will be 
given by representatives or the oc- 
cupations in which the most inter- 
est has been shown. 

Misses Amanda M. Ellis, Marga- 
ret Courtright, and Louise Purvis 
drove to Denver on Wednesday 
evening to attend the Bertrand Rus- 
sel lecture on "The Outlook for 
Civilization. 



COLLEGE ORGANIZATIONS 
WILL ENTERTAIN ALUMNI 



Plans for the entertainment of 
alumni who are at Colorado College 
for Homecoming feature most of 
the activities arranged for the week- 
end. The annual luncheon will be 
held at Bemis hall, tomorrow at 
twelve-twenty o'clock. This after- 
noon, the members of Hypatia will 
be hostesses at tea in Bemis hall, 
honoring the alumnae. Tomorrow 
morning the women's societies will 
hold their breakfasts-Minerva at the 
Chapel inn, Hypatia at the Anders, 
Contemporary at the Anders, and 
Zetalethian at the Broadmoor. The 
fraternities and societies will hold 
buffet suppers, tomorrow evening at 
six o'clock. Minerva, Hypatia, 
Contemporary, Zetalethian, Beta 
Theta Pi, Phi Gamma Delta, Phi 
Delta Theta, Kappa Sigma, Sigma 
Chi, Pi Kappa Alpha, and Delta 
Alpha Phi will entertain at their 
club and chapter houses. President 
and Mrs. Mierow will be at home 
to alumni and friends of the college, 
at 24 College place. Tomorrow 
afternoon the reception will be held 
immediately after the Tiger-Utah 



ON UNIVERSITY PROPERTY. 

About the time that the opposing teams were lining up for the sec- 
ond half of the football game last Saturday, six college students were 
bound for the police station. 

They had been arrested for the American practice of "tipping the 
bottle." 

Our first reaction to the situation is dictated by worship of the 
popular idol. Expediency. Why, we wonder, cannot people confine self- 
indulgence in vice to private and secluded r 

It would certainly seem that students from the University of Denver 
and all visiting institutions should realize that drinking on university 
property is as obnoxious and out of place as a bathtub on the front lawn. 

After all, is there not more to be considered than self? Are not 
the ideals of the group and the institution with which we are associated 
of importance? — Denver Clarion. 




BEAT 
UTAH 

Our shop will be closed Sat- 
urday for the game. We will 
be in the stands rooting for 
the Tigers. 

Bob Mills 
Bob Crowder 

Main 5500 

SHOP FOR GENTLEMEN 
1 1 1 Pikes Peak Avenue 



At the Game buy 

CARNATIONS 

from 

THE CONTEMPS 



YE TOASTIE 
SANDWICH SHOP 

24 E. Pikes Peak Phone M. 2963 

"One You Try, Always You Buy." 

We deliver anywhere in town. 



Good Developing 
and Printing 

Will Assure 
Best Possible 
Pictures of 
Home-coming 
Activities 

Even after most skillful fo- 
cusing, composition, timing 
and stopping you still must 
depend on Developing and 
printing to show the results 
of your picture taking. 

And we do GOOD develop- 
ing and Printing because we 
like to see our customers at- 
tain the best possible results. 

Sheaffer, Wahl and Parker 

Fountain Pens and 

Pencils. 




1 7 N. Tejon 



THE TIGER 



15 



— ♦ 



A SERVICE 
Evrey for Purse 



THE 
PEARL LAUNDRY 






BUICK MOTOR CARS 



Strang's 



Harry D. MacDonald 
President 



IHE J. S. BROWN 

MERCANTILE 

COMPANY 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



Made in Colorado Springs 

VAN BRIGLE 
ART POTTERY 

The world's most famous 
art pottery. 

Visitors always welcome. 



Werr a Tiger "Woolie" and "Mum' 
to the Game. 




30 N. Tejon Phone M. 214 



Rhone Main 1710 

IDEAL 

i CLEANERS 

5 West Colorado Ave. 



Valetor Pressing Service 



Student Expelled For 
Illegal Electioneering 

Joseph Martin of Oak Cheek 
rnd a senior student at the Univer- 
sity of Colorado, was suspended 
from the institution last week for a 
period of one year because of al- 
leged dishonest practices in the 
sophomore election. Difficulties in 
school elections have torn the Uni- 
versity since last spring. A com- 
mittee was appointed to revise the 
present student government, and 
Martin was named a member of the 
committee. The action was brought 
against Martin after the sophomore 
election was declared illegal after 
an investigation. 



Glee Clubs Of Colleges 
To Continue Broadcasts 



College students as well as Alum- 
ni throughout the country will be 
glad to know that the college 
musical organization broadcasts 
such as those featured by Amherst, 
Dartmouth , Illinois, Northwestern, 
Columbia, Ohio State, University of 
Pennsylvania and others, last year, 
will be continued again this year. 

• The second broadcast was 
that of the Purdue Glee Club at the 
9 to 9:30 Central Standard Time, 
Wednesday, October 30th. College 
Humor Magazine and the Kolster 
Company who sponsor these pro- 
grams have promised many more 
.nteresting announcements for the 
near future. 



Utah Gets $155,000 

For Library Plant 

Logan, Utah— R. M. L P. A.— 
Utah State is to have a new $155,- 
000 library. The plans have already 
been submitted to the architect 
and these specify a three story 
buildnig in Italian Renaissance 
style. 



Saturday's Game Called 

Fathers and Mothers 

Day 

Logan, Utah— R. M. I. P. A.— 
Colorado College played Utah 
Aggies at Logan on what has been 
termed Father's and Mother's Day 
or what would correspond to our 
Homecoming. This is one of t h e 
few games which are played in Lo- 
grn since the town is believed by 
some to be not sufficiently large to 
draw a football crowd and the 
home games are usually held in 
Ogden. 

In an editorial in their paper. 
Student Life, this practice of hold- 
ing games out of town is bewailed 
and there is a plea made for more 
worthwhile grmes to be held in the 
$50,000 stadium which was built 
only three years ago. 



Good Plumbing and Heating 

Get an estimate on your next job 

J. C. ST. JOHN 

PLUMBINGS HEATING COMPANY 



226 N. Tejon St. 



B 



AKER 

Automatic Oil 
URNER 



M. 48 



BUILDING supplies of course include at the same time every- 
thing used in repairs, improvements, etc., with Mill Work 
of the highest class workmans>hip. 

CRISSEY-FOWLER 

LUMBER COMPANY 



117 W. Vermijo 



Main 101 



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Drily Only Combination Daily and Sunday 

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ELECTROL OIL BURNERS 
Plumbing Heating 



312 N. 
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Telephone 1364 129 N. Tejon 



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Kiiorr's Market 

FOR YOUR PARTIES OR PICNICS 



Let us supply you with 
good things to eat 



123 North Tejon 



Phone 2602 



16 



THE TIGER 



ina kick its Distance/ 




in a 



cigarette it's | AST E / 



Do ONE THING, and do it well." In making 
cigarettes, choose the one thing that counts — 
good taste — and give full measure! 

From start to finish, that's the Chesterfield 
story. Good tobaccos, skilfully blended and 
cross-blended, the standard Chesterfield method 
—appetizing flavor, rich fragrance, wholesome 
satisfying character — 

"TASTE above everything" 




MILD ... and yet 
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© 1929, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



WELCOME ALUMNI 

The place to meet for Good things TO EAT! 



COLLEGE IN 

J. C. Culley, Prop. 




VOLUME XXXII 
Number 9 



Obc Colorado College ^^ 

wmmm 

Official Students Publication 

November 15, 1929 




iiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiJiiiiiiiiJiiiiiiiiiiiniMiiiiMniiiiMiiiriiMiii 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIJIM 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiii 












Endowment 

Campaign 

Now 

In 

Full 

Swing 




Five Million 

Dollars 

Is 

The 
Qoal 



EUGENE P. SHOVE, prominent banker of Colorado Springs and a member of the Board of Trus- 
tees of Colorado College, who gave $250,000 to the college for a new chapel last year, and at t h e 
Homecoming meeting of the alumni, started the building campaign moving by giving an additional 
$100,000 to provide proper maintenance of the building and to procure speakers. 



•;^l 




Office of Publication: 23 We«t Colorado Ave, Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE TIGER 



Ladies' 
Dresses 
Furs 
Gloves 
Hats 
Scarfs 
Etc. 



"FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE" 

We Dry Clean 

Thone us first" 




M. 2958 



Gents' 
Hats 
Topcoats 
Tuxedos 
Gloves 
Ties 

Sweaters 
Etc. 





It Can Be Done 
Whenever You Want To 

Even though your home town may be miles 
from the campus, you can "visit" Mother and Dad 
whenever you want. Today is a good time to begin. 
Just lift the nearest telephone receiver, give the 
operator your home telephone number and the con- 
nection will be quickly completed. It costs but 
little and will please them at home more than sev- 
eral letters. 

If funds are a little low, you can make the call 

"collect," and (if you have to) settle 

up with Dad later. 




The Mountain States 
Telephone & Telegraph Co. 



Called For — Delivered — Laundered — 
and Ready to Use 

SHEETS 7 cents 

BATH TOWELS 2 cents 

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Issued Friday of each week. Entered at the Post Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter. 



^hded tiger 



VOLUME XXXII 



Colorado College Weekly News Magazine 



-'Number 9 



KEYSER PLAYS LEAD 
IN "THE WILD DUCK" 




Van Dyke 



le product 

'it. 



»3 



Tonight will see Koshare's big 
opening night with Ibsen's "T h e 
Wild Duck" as the attraction. This 
is the most ambi- 
tious and by far 
the best play Ko- 
share has ever put 
on. Koshare has 
been rightly criti- 
cized for the type 
of production i t 
has used in the 
past, but this year should see all 
that wiped out in a series of really 
fine and worthwhile productions 
Mr. Sharp has f 
done a fine piece 
of work, in the 
directing of the 
"Wild Duck", 
and the players 
have responded 
splendidly. 

"The Wild 
Duck" brings 
forth some in- 
tense situations thrown in sharp re- 
lief by the characters who are all 
so vastly different to each other, 
yet all adding to the gripping cli- 
max. Gregers takes it upon him- 
self to rid his friend, Hialmar, of 
the "life-delusion" he is living. 
What happens > — the result is car- 
ried frr beyond that which Gregers 
has planned; and so, is Gregers 
right Wihen he says to Relling, "If 
what you say is so, then life is not 
worth living." 

Come to the "Wild Duck" and 
see how Gregers uses a child as a 
means to his ends, and how his 
ends are climaxed m a violent shock 

(Continued on page 8) 



Keyser 



Change Of Calendar 

Is Made By Faculty 

Due to an error in the College 
Calendar as printed in the Catalog, 
the first semester of the present 
year is only fourteen weeks in 
length, the second semester six- 
teen. 

In order to remedy this situation, 
the beginning of mid-year examin- 
ations will be postponed from Jan- 
uary 17 (as listed in the Catalog) 
to January 24. 

The registration for the second 
semester will likewise be postponed 
from January 27 to February 3. In 
this way, each semester will, as 
usual, contain a full fifteen weeks 
of classroom work. 



Freshman Team 
Loses Game to 
Western State 



By Ivan Schweninger 
Things didn't go so well for the 
Tiger F-"rosh over on the Western 
Slope Armistice Day. The weath- 
er was cold; and worse than that, 
the Western State Freshmen seemed 
to delight in the frigid temperature 
and galloped to a 33-0 victory 
while fifteen or sixteen red-nosed 
Mountaineer co-eds cheered. 

The boys in Orange and Black 
never did measure up to their 
standard of play. Stopped in their 
errly attempts to score, the Ben- 
gals played loose football for the 
remaining periods. Captain Schnurr, 
Butler, and Thomas were taken 
from the game because of injuries, 
but are back in uniform now. The 
men who played: 

Left end; Thomas, Hall; left 
tackle: Weidman; left guard; But- 
ler, Onufronk; center: Ryan; 
right guard: McClurg; right tac- 
kle; Roark; right end: Stillman; 
and in the backfield: Captain 
Schnurr, Bradshaw, Owens, De- 
Holtzer, Deutsch, Schweninger, 
Butterfield, Chestnolvich, and Pul- 
liam. 

A game with the Junior college 
at Grand Junction on Thanksgiv- 
ing Day concludes the Freshmen 
football season. 



ADDITIONAL GIFT OF $109,000 
BY SHOVE ANNOUNCED BY MIEROW 

By Wilmoth Harris 
The additional endowment of $100,000 by Eugene P. Shove to .his 
$250,000 gift of last year was announced by President C. C. Mierow 
at the Colorado College alumni luncheon which was held Saturday at 
Bemis Hall. The Shove gift which is to be known as the Eva Louise 
Shove Fund is to be used for the maintenance of the new chapel. It 
is believed that it will take a considerable amount to keep such an ex- 
pensive chapel in proper order so Mr. Shove decided to make a large 
enough fund to keep the chapel 



EDITOR AND MANAGER TO 
AHEND PRESS MEETING 



Representatives from twelve 
Rocky Mountain Conference news- 
papers will be entertained by the 
University of Denver December 6 
and 7 at the annual Rocky Moun- 
tain Intercollegiate Press Confer- 
ence. More than 200 delegates are 
expected to be present. 

The present plans for the pro- 
gram includes registration, a lunch- 
eon, a business meeting, a banquet, 
and a play to be presented by the 
University of Denver Drama Club 
on Friday. On Saturday, there 
will be another business meeting, a 
luncheon, a football game, a ban- 
quet and a dance. 

Two or more 
from Colorado Colh 
these meetings. 



representatives 
ge will attend 



Many Students Practice for '29 Follies 



By Marian MacMillan 

"We'll sing some new songs. 

An old song or two, 

Follies, the Legion Follies." — 
So goes the theme song of the 
spectacular musical review that will 
be presented by the local American 
Legion Post at the Burns-Para- 
mount theatre, November 25, 26, 
and 27. The scenes and costumes 
are imported from New York City 
for the first time in history, and a 
company of 175 people and an 18 
piece stage band give promise of 
the most elaborate production ever 
staged in the annals of local theat- 
ricals. 

One of the outstanding features 
of the Follies is the vein of comedy 
interspersing the more serious and 
picturesque classic beauty of the 
numbers. Members of the Junior 
League will appear in two numbers 



of charm and dignity for which 
special wigs and costumes are be- 
ing made, and many types of music 
will be featured by competent per- 
formers of the city. 

Students of Colorado College ap- 
pearing in the production include 
M'rirm Lockhrrt, Marian Coles, 
Olive Harner, Marian MacMillan, 
Margaret Bradfield, Virginia Ray- 
burn, Gretchen Sherk, Margaret En- 
vart. Elvin Griffith, John Thurston. 
Dewitt Tucker, Paul Conover, Dick 
Sanderson, Marvin Ingebretson. 
Arthur Bayliss, Winnie Crouch and 
Clp.ire Jenks. Mrs. Dan Hampton is 
in charge of the review and in ad- 
dition to directing the orchestra, 
she IS seen in many novelty numbers 
The elaborrte finals gave promise 
of classic glamor and hilarious 
comedy never before seen in former 
productions. 



to 

always complete. This sum for 
maintenance will also cover the ex- 
penses of procuring speakers and 
music. 

This gift is the first large sum re 
ceived in the present endowment 
campaign. It is the aim of the 
Endowment committee to secure 
$2,500,000 for permanent en- 
dowment and $1,000,000 for new 
building funds. 

During the remainder of the 
luncheon, members of the adminis- 
tration and a number of alumni 
spoke. The theme of all their 
speeches was expressed by Mr. Sper- 
ry Packard when he said. "The 
more we see of life the better we 
know thtt nothmg counts except 
spirit — we have always been com- 
pelcd to fight against odds but at 
Colorado College no matter what 
the odds we are fighting." 

The general trend of the speeches 
concerned the growth and develop- 
ment of Colorado College. How- 
ever, John J. Vandamoer "Herb" 
Sinton and several others stressed 
football in their talks. "Tub" Mor- 
ris summed up their feelings when 
he said, "We want the boys to win, 
but win or lose, they are still our 
team.' 



House Decoration Prize 
Is Won By Phi Gams 



The fraternity house decoration 
prize was awarded to the Phi Gam- 
ma Delta fraternity this year. Hon- 
orable mention was given to Beta 
Theta Pi and Kappa Sigma. The 
house decorations showed up much 
better at night as flood lights were 
used to illuminrle the decorations. 
The judges were Dean Louise Fau- 
teaux. Dean William W. Lovitt, C. 
William Penland, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Paul Swan. 



THE TIGER 



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Phone 

Main 67 or 120 



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Quality Lunch 



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Colorado Springs, Colo. 



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College Scribes Will 
Choose Mythical Team 

An official collegiate all Rocky 
Mountain conference eleven is be- 
ing selected this year under the 
auspices of the Utah Chronicle 
sports staff. This staff with the 
aid of the sports editors of the lead- 
ing college newspapers will have 
the mythical selection ready by 
November 22. 

Each of the sports editors v^all 
select a first and second team 
which he will send to the Chronicle 
sports staff, this is to be accom- 
panied by an article about the se- 
lection, giving reasons why they 
were picked. These selected teams 
will then be pooled after which an 
official selection will be drawn up, 
which will be published in the No- 
vember 22 issue of the Utah Chron- 
icle. Fred M. Oliver sports editor 
of the Redskin paper, is in charge 
of the selection. 



Kochanski Is Heard 

By College Students 

Civic Concert Wednesday attract- 
ed many C. C. students. The ap- 
pearance of Paul Kochanski re- 
vealed a special treat, a program 
which was solid yet a very popular 
one. The first number was one of 
the most attractive numbers on the 
program. It is outstanding among 
the classical pieces. 

In the Hungarian gypsy number 
compared somewhat with modern 
jazz yet was far beyond it. In the 
fourth group the violinist played 
"Flight" which was dedicated to 
Colonel Charles Lindbergh. Pierre 
Luboshutz played the piano ac- 
companiments. 

Bebe Daniels Plays 

Lead in "Rio Rita" 



^ 



Superb in entertainment. Truly a 
marvelous achievement in the field 
of talking and singing pictures. 

Bebe Daniels plays an outstand- 
ing role as "Rio Rita." She long 
has been known to movie fans as a 
fine actress, but here she success- 
fully shows what she can do, not 
only in a dramatic role, but in a 
singing part. John Boles as t h e 
hero does equally well. Don Alva- 
rado is satisfactory, but seldom 
seen. Dorothy Lee is cute, the way 
the fans like to see her. Bert 
Wheeler and Robert Woolsey are 
good as the comedians who pro- 
voke laughter in such rapid fash- 
ion that hardly enough time is al- 
lowed between each joke for a 
breathing spell. Georges Renevant 
as the villain capably handles his 
part. 



THE TIGER 



Homecoming Play 
Well Presented 



By James Keyser 
A very worthwhile production 
was presented by Koshare for the 
traditional one act play which is 
given every Homecoming. The 
cast is to be congratulated upon its 
work and especial credit is due to 
Kos,hare's new director. Art Sharp, 
for the way in which he handled 
this one act thriller. 

We hear that two professors and 
several students were refused ad- 
mission because they arrived late. 
This is regrettable but it was abso- 
lutely necessary since any inter- 
ruption would have detracted much 
from the effect of the play and we 
wish to congratulate the one re- 
sponsible for this. 

Dunsany's "A Night at an Inn" 
was admirably handled by the cast. 
Harold Harmon did particularly 
well and carried much of the play 
with his excellent performance. Al- 
most equally good was a new char- 
acter in Colorado College dramatic 
production, Kenneth Renken, who 
added much by ,his interpretations 
of the character, Albert. T. E. Now- 
ells, Jr. and Arthur Bishop did well. 
The priests heightened the suspense 
and performed the lines very well. 
The idol was also admirably fitted 
to his part. 

With this production and that of 
"The Wild Duck," which is to be 
played in Cogswell this week end, 
it looks as though Koshare were go- 
ing to be a very active part of the 
campus activities this year. It is 
hoped that they may continue to 
receive support from the student 
body. "The Wild Duck" should be 
worth while, try to make arrange- 
ments to see it. 



OFFICERS ARE ELECTED 
BY WINTER NIGHT CLUB 



Mustaches Appear On 
U. Of Denver Campus 

The Denver University students 
have continued to hold their de- 
termination to refrain from shaving 
until their football eleven wins a 
game. Two weeks ago, they were 
optimistic and decided not to shave 
until they won a game. The coeds 
agreed not to paint, powder, or 
rouge for the same length of time. 

First they played a tie game 
against the University of Colorado; 
last week, their schedule held an 
open date; tomorrow, they have a 
tough nut to crack against Utah 
Aggies. Credit must be given to 
them if they stick through their 
bargain, and it will be a faithful 
cheeriilg section that roots for Den- 
ver this Saturday. 



The annual meeting and dinner 
of the Winter Night club will be 
held at the Antlers hotel on Friday 
evening, November 15th, at seven 
o'clock. The address of the eve- 
ning will be delivered by Dr. Syl- 
vanus G. Morley of the Carnegie 
Institution of Washington, D. C, an 
archaeologist of international repu- 
tation. Dr. Morley will speak on 
the explorations and excavations in 
Southern Mexico and Central Amer- 
ca which have been carried on un- 
der his direction for both the School 
of American Archaeology and the 
Carnegie Institution for some years. 
The address will be illustrated with 
many photographic slides of un- 
usual interest. The most advanced 
culture of prehistoric America was 
that of the Maya in Yucatan, 
Guatemala and British Honduras, 
and it is of the ruined cities of 
these people that Dr. Morley will 
tell in his lecture before the club. 
It will be recalled that recently 
Col. Chas. A. Lindberg and Dr. A. 
V. Kidder, of the Carnegie Institu- 
tion explored this land of mystic cit- 
ies by aeroplane, passing over many 
of the ruins in the excavation of 
which Dr. Morley has been en- 
gaged. 

At the behest of Mr. Postle- 
thwaite. President of the Winter 
Night Club, Dr. Morley has kindly 
agreed to address the class of An- 
thropology I, in the Palmer Hall 
Pit, Saturday, the 16th, at 10:30 
A. M. Dr. Morley will be the sec- 
ond distinguished visitor to the 
class. Dr. F. B. Renaud, Professor 
of Anthropology and Archaeology 
at the University of Denver, spoke 
several weeks ago at the time of the 
Archaelogical Institute meeting. 
Thru the services of such men as 
these, Mr. Postlethwaite is helping 
materially to advance the popular- 
ity of Anthropology at Colorado 
College. Any students interested in 
this subject are cordially invited to 
attend this lecture. 

Several men connected directly 
with the college are officers of this 
club. Oliver H. Shoup has just 
been elected president; William S. 
Jackson, second vice president; and 
Dean Hershey, third vice president. 
I 



Student Chooses Between Bullet 
And Poison and Then Takes Date 



A meeting of the editorial 
staff of the Tiger will be held 
at Ticknor study at 7:30 
Tuesday evening. All mem- 
bers who do not leave a writ- 
ten excuse in case of neces- 
sary absence in the Tiger box 
before the meeting will be 
dropped from the staff. 



Suicide, that shall be my end. 
And when my lifeless body lies be- 
fore her, then shall she unbend and 
let fall burning tears of remorse. 
But I shall lie there silently, mock- 
ingly, and may my stony glance 
freeze her very vitals like a Frid- 
gidair. And folks will point at her 
and whisper low when she passes, 
"She killed him." For surely I 
must die. Alas, how shall the dead 
be done? 

I have it. Shooting. No, it can- 
not be for then I should be forced 
to get a permit to carry firearms. 
Moreover the police would prob- 
ably take me in for disturbing the 
peace. And then, I have no gun. 
Furthermore shooting always dis- 
figures one so, and I would be an 
austere corpse unmarred by bloody 
wounds. 

Stabbing is also messy. Think 
how the lineolium would look. A 



J unior Farce Manager 
Is Chosen By Council 

Richard Vanderhoof was chosen 
manager of this year's Junior 
Farce. The name, date and place 
of the play will be announced lat- 
er. Vanderhoof has had experience 
before in managing college func- 
tions, having been manager of the 
Sophomore Barbecue and chair- 
man of the Homecoming commit- 
tee. 



Art Baylis Is Chosen 

1929 Debate Manager 



Arthur Baylis was elected debate 
manager \or the ensuing year at a 
meeting of last year's debate squad 
Tuesday last. Baylis was very ac- 
tive in this line of forensic activit- 
ies last year and his capability of 
handling this responsibility is not 
to be denied. 

Debate this year in C. C. has 
prospects of assuming an unusually 
important role in the realm of in- 
lercollegiate activities. A resume 
of the program this year which was 
discussed at the meeting includes 
the Rocky Mountain Conference 
championship tournament to be 
held here during the month of Feb- 
ruary, and an extensive tour thru 
the East by a team to be selected 
late in the season. 

Aside from these two major pro- 
jects there will be a schedule of 
regular debates which will keep the 
debaters busy during the entire sea- 
son. A tentative arrangement of 
the schedule is being made and will 
be announced soon. 



knife too, is a necessary accessory 
to that crime and I have none. It 
could be done with a nailfile or a 
hatpin, but these instruments might 
infect the incision and cause blood 
poisoning, and my death must be 
a gallant one. 

A high dive from some lofty pin- 
acle, or hanging from the bannister 
might be the solution. I'm afraid 
ot heights, tho, they make me so 
dizzy. I would be heroic in deats. 
As for the latter suggestion, the 
bannister on our staircase is too 
frail to sustain my weight. Then 
too , I never could stand tight col- 
lars, let alone being choked by a 
nasty, dirty old rope. I'd probably 
stick out my tongue, too, and it's 
coated. 

No, not one of these will do. Let 
me see now. Ah, herte it is. I'll 
drown myself. But on a second 
thought I might not like that. The 
water is too dirty. And if I hap- 
pened to be rescued I'm sure I'd 
take cold and maybe die from ex- 
posure. I cannot risk my life like 
that for my death must be a re- 
vengeful one. Lastly, the fake is 
only three feet deep. 

Ah ha. I shall poison myself. 
That's it. Let's see, there's a bot- 
tle of poison in the medicine cab- 
inet. Yes, there it is. Ah, you 
little white crystals I put you in the 
glass, several of you. Then I dis- 
solve you thus. I will drink the sol- 
ution, jump into my car, dash to her 
house, and there die on the front 
steps. Well, all is arranged. Here 
IS the fatal poison. There's my car. 
Good bye cruel world, Adieux, 

Hasta Luego. Phew, Oh. 

Mumm, My Lord, what the heck 
does someone mean by putting the 
Bromo-Selzer in that bottle. Guess 
they want to poison a person. That 
stuff is terrible. I'm glad she 
didn't see that one or she would 
have laughed — the heartless hussy. 
But never fear, there are other 
ways. Uh, I wonder when I'll quit 
tasting that beastly stuff. 

Just for that I'll - - - Yes mam, 
come right in. There's the tele- 
phone over there. — So you've just 
moved in next door. And you 
don't know anyone, that's too bad. 
I don't know many but I'd be glad 
to introduce you to those I do 
know. Why not start tonight? We 
can get acquainted anyway. Seven 
sharp, then. Goodbye. 

Say is that a cute blond? Guess 
I'll give up this suicide idea just 
to spite the old dame. And besides, 
I've got a date tonight. 



THE TIGER 



of Rocky Mountain 
Inter-CoUecriate Presa 
Association 




The Colorado College 

Newspaper, 

Published Weekly by the 

Students. 



LLOYD H. ELLIS Main 1975 Editor 

James Keyser Associate Editor Barratt O'Hara Desk Editor 



JAMES PATTERSON Main 2575 Manager 

Frank Dentan, Jr Advertising Manager 



A BIGGER AND BETTER COLORADO COLLEGE. 

With a quarter of a million dollar chapel to be built this Spring, 
and a fund of $100,000 to maintain this building, Colorado College has 
embarked upon a new building program. In fact, a campaign has been 
started to raise three and a half million dollars. Of this sum one mil- 
lion dollars will be used to erect new buildings. For some years, the 
college has suffered growing pains. The library is too small for the 
number of books it contains. The number of recitation rooms have been 
too few. The women have been especially cramped for room in their 
physical education quarters. A million dollars will do much to make 
room for the present enrollment, and leave room for the matriculation 
of more students. 

But structures alone are not to be built. Two and a half million 
dollars is sought to increase the present endowment of Colorado College 
to five million dollars. It is a known fact that the college does not pay 
for itself by tuition and interest of its present endowment. This money 
will enable the administration to operate without a deficit. New pro- 
fessors can be secured with the high salaries; old faculty members who 
have left or are about to leave because of small salaries will remain 
wdth the college. 

At present, Colorado College is well known both in the Rocky 
Mountain region and in the United States for its scholarship and learn- 
ing. It is an endowed school unchecked by the vagaries of a state leg- 
islature or of a narrow religious sect. It is a member of the Harvard Ex- 
change with Carleton, Beloit, Grinnel, Knox, and Pomona. With the 
new building program and the increased endowment, Colorado College 
ought to resume its position of old when Colorado College was "one of 
the best" colleges of the West. It has been no new thing for it to bar 
students from its ranks for poor standing. It is hoped that even in 
spite of new facilities for an increased enrollment, that the administra- 
tion will always try to keep Colorado College in a rank by itself. 



THE GROWLERS DANCE. 

Too often one may pick up a newspaper or magazine and read a 
lurid account of how the modern college student is not what he should 
be and how much better the old grad was in his day. It is especially 
noticeable how often the question of liquor and college students are 
closely linked. 

Last year, the college celebrated its annual Growlers' Dance at the 
Broadmoor Hotel. There was too much pep and celebration that eve- 
ning, and the college authorities prohibited public college dances for 
the remainder of the school year. This year representatives of the 
Growlers' Club approached several hotel managers in an attempt to ob- 
tain a place for the Homecoming Dance, and no hotel manager would 
rent his ball room. Too much rowdyness of the previous year made 
these managers chary of putting on such an affair. 

At the Broadmoor Hotel last Saturday evening, the ball room was 
packed by Colorado College students. The dance was at least an im- 
provement over the brawl that was staged last year. One cannot say 
there was no liquor there, but the drunkenness was held down to an ap- 
preciable extent. 

To let one of the finest dances and traditions of Colorado College 
pass on because of drunkeness seems to belittle the true spirit of the 
average Colorado College student. There is only a small minority who 
drink and get drunk. Last year a large number of out of town stu- 
dents and visiting alumni contributed more than their share to the cele- 
bration. This year there were few alumni and students from other 
schools present. But we cannot blame these people wholly for last 
year's affair and the discipline of this year. We must continue to 
show improvement and only complete absence of such parties will bring 
the business people of Colorado Springs and the faculty of Colorado 
College around to our side. 



IN DEFENSE OF GREEKS. 

Charges that fraternities and sororities constitute a menace to cam- 
pus democracy are hurled from every quarter during the collegiate year. 
That is a popular thing to do. These broadsides please everybody but 
the Greeks, and the Greeks never seem to care much. 

Ideals and practices of these Greek letter organizations often clash, 
and in that conflict may be found the best obvious reasons for verbal 
attack. 

Hundreds of instances can be cited to prove that conditions are 
improving on the local campus. Practices are beginning to approxi- 
mate ideals. For this, every Greek who contributes to the change ought 
to be commended. 

Sincere efforts to change the rushing system are being made. There 
are technical obstacles in the path of this aim which it will take many 
months to remove, but they will be wiped away as surely as progress of 
the University continues. 

Political "combines" are becoming unpopular. Near at hand is 
the day when these will be history. There is a growing realization that 
candidates should run for office on merit alone. Elections wall assume 
new significance when this becomes a common conception among Greeks. 

Democracy prevails among the organizations themselves. This is 
a hopeful sign because it heralds the day when this democracy will ex- 
tend beyond its present boundaries to include independents as well as 
Greeks in the distribution of its benefits. — D. U. Clarion. 



Literary 



CRITICAL NOTE: A mood sketch by James Keyser, or rather a 
sketch of moods, variable moods, shallow moods. Shallow? How well 
defined is a man's soul, how poignant is a man's philosophy, how defi- 
nite is his psychology, if man allows his physical discomforts to dictate 
his moods? Should the cripple be sullen, the invalid ironical ,the idiot 
incapable of loving beauty? Are there two things to be considered in 
man, body and soul, or its body supreme in its distaste, its limitation, its 
illusions. Age old questions, to be sure, and we like to avoid them, be- 
cause they only bring chaos. But it would be well if a few more were 
to dwell a while in chaos; it might bring a subtle appreciation of the 
inevitable laws of this universe. This mood sketch is admirable in abil- 
ity to create confusion. We, as a whole, need more of this sort of 
mental stirring — John W. Haussermann, Jr. 



Night, stars, moon shining on billowing, feathery clouds. Walking 
along slowly thinking of the happenings of the day. After all, things 
are coming rather well. The world is beautiful, the good is better than 
the bad. An unobtrusive breeze loosens a leaf from the yellowing trees. 
It slowly floats to the ground to rest for a moment before it is picked 
up by an aggressive little gust to be blown somewhere else. How like 
the leaf we are and yet the wind does seem to know what is best for it. 
Another chest is expanded, another pair of lungs are filled to their ca- 
pacity, and eyes begin to feel moist with the thought that God s world 
is a beautiful thing and its wonderful to be alive. 

Evening, winter, soft, clinging flakes of creamy snow sinking with 
a gentle, swirling motion to earth from a sky that is softly lighted by 
the reflected light from the town beneath it. Walking briskly, bare- 
headed, head thrown back. Feet crunching the dry snow, reveling in 
the elements and their impotency. The world can be conquered to- 
night, there's no obstacles. Thank God I was created an able bodied 
man. 

Afternoon, summer, hazy, lifeless atmosphere. Blue cloudless sky 
with snow capped, cool mountains throwing their reflections here and 
there on the banks of the green clear lake. Pine trees near the shore 
bending low to whisper to one another as an unruly whiff of wind 
breaks away to mar the church like silence of that July day. Lying on 
that white clean sand, lazily looking at the cloudless sky. What's the 
use of life's materialistic worries? Even religion is useless. Only calm, 
quiet, beauty, contemplation are worth while. 

Morning, fog, smoke, and winter. Sun cruelly brilliant as it re- 
veals dirty snow on streets, side-walks, lawns, and naked, shameless 
trees. Headache, hungry, don't feel like eating a thing though, hard to 
get eyes open, awful taste in mouth — hangover. God! Is there a 
God? Life's one dirty deal after another. — Jim Keyser. 



THE TIGER 



Couture's 

French Cleaning and Dyeing Co. 

Phones 1288-1289 
218 N. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 



HOLLY SUGAR 

is 
the Best 

Sugar the essential food. 

HOLLY SUGAR 
CORPORATION 



Under New Management 

The College 
Barber Shop 

Ralph Schildknecht, Proprietor 

103 E. Cache la Poudre 
Colorado Springs 



Quality 

Cleaners and Dyers 

SUITS, O'COATS 

HATS $1.25 

U-Fone 1-8-1-1 We'll CaU 

H. A. Thompson 
10 E. Kiowa 



PLAZA HOTEL BEAUTY SHOP 

Finger wave — Marcels 

Permanent Waves 
Phone Main 2515 



When you consider that you 
can purchase any make type- 
writer on monthly paymenb 
as small as $5.00 it is not a 
question of affording it. 

The essential question is if 
you can afford to be without 



x^ 




125 N. Tejon 



Main 95 



SOCIETY 



Minerva alumnae who attended 
the Homecoming breakfast at the 
Antlers hotel, Saturday morning, 
November 9, included Mrs. Edmund 
C. van Diest, Miss Eloise van Diest, 
Mrs. Kirkwood, Mrs. Arthur G. 
Sharp, Sr., Miss Amanda M. Ellis, 
Miss Catherine Hood, Mrs. Perkins, 
Miss Claudine Sellers, Miss Mar- 
garet Weinberger. 

Guests at Bemis Hall last week- 
end included Mary Ritter, Newcas- 
tle, Helen Morris, Greeley; Marian 
Cory, Denver; Vera and Veva Cor- 
lett, Boulder; Margaret Foote, 
Glenwood Springs, Ingrid Berg, Pu- 
eblo; and Ruth Donaldson. All are 
former Colorado College students. 

Celebrating the twenty-fifth an- 
niversary of the foundmg of Beta 
Omega of Kappa Sigma, the an- 
nual Homecoming banquet was held 
at the Ann Louise, Saturday, No- 
vember 9. About seventy members 
and alumni attended. 

Stewart Wilson, student body 
president, had as his guest during 
the week-end, Elton Pace, president 
of the student body at the Univer- 
sity of Utah. 

Alumnae who attended the Hy- 
patia breakfast at the Antlers ho- 
tel, Saturday, November 9, included 
Miss Helene Elliott, Miss England, 
Mrs. A. W. Van Lopik, Miss Bum- 
stead, Mrs. Charles, Mrs. Kittle- 
man, and Mrs. W. D. Copeland. 

Mr. Edwin A. Dietrich and ih i s 
ensemble of the Colorado college 
School of Music furnished the pro- 
gram for the coffee hour at Bemis 
Hall .Sunday, November 10. 

Announcement has been made of 
the marriage of Miss Eunice Gard- 
ner of Pueblo to Mr. James Gorm- 
ley of Grand Junction. Both at- 
tended Colorado College where 
Mrs. Gormley was a member of Hy- 
patia society, and Mr. Gormley was 
a Sigma Chi. The wedding took 
place in Pueblo on November 8. 
The Gormleys will make their home 
in Grand Junction. 

Zetalcthian alumnae who attend- 
ed the society's Homecoming break- 
fast at the Broadmoor hotel, last 
Saturday morning included: Verla 
Parker, lone Ward. Hazel Martin. 
Blanche Horsley, Mrs. Cook. Mary 
Kirby, Bessie Shepherd, Marjorie 
Mason, Anita Osborn, Wilma 
Charles, Dorothy Rose, Ruth 
Brown. Jo Hetherly, and Marjorie 
Morrell. 



Contemporary society held its 
birthday dinner at the club house 
yesterday evening. 

Several dances are scheduled on 
the social calendar for this week- 
end. The Phi Delta Thetas and 
the Minervas are entertaining to- 
night, and tomorrow Contemporary 
society and the Phi Gamma Delta 
fraternity will have parties. 



The Beta Theta Pi fraternity en- 
tertained at a dance at their chap- 
ter house on Friday, November 8. 
The guests included Virginia Dew- 
ey, Grace Perkins, Dorothy Faus, 
Sally Sheldon. Beth Smith, Jo 
Campbell, Alyce Ireland, Katherine 
Herbert, Margaret Killian, Lois See- 
Herbert. Margaret Killian, Lis See- 
bach, Eva Crowder. Phyllis Ormsby, 
Jean Horan, Jane Lowell, Kay Gil- 
bert, Evaline Craig, Betty Shonsby, 
Elizabeth Nelson, Mary Barnes. Kay 
Poland, Marian Coles, Jean Critz, 
Barbara Garms. Katherine Askin. 
Mrs. Dale Osbrone, Mrs. J. F. 
Phelps, Mrs. Tom Scottt, and Mrs. 
Hugh Strachan. Ward Armstrong, 
Hugh Patrick, Elton Pace, Bill 
Pace, L. Gray and J. Eliott were 
guests from Utah. The chaperons 
were Dr. and Mrs. John B. Crouch 
and Prof, and Mrs. Frank M. Okey. 



Mrs. Rosamond Dean Snow from 
the Teacher Placement Bureau in 
Boston spent the week-end with 
Miss Louise Purvis at Bemis Hall. 

Dean Gladys Bell of Denver Uni- 
versity was the week-end guest of 
Dean Fauteaux. Dean Bell was a 
member of the graduating class of 

1929. 

Dean Fauteaux attended a meet- 
ing of all the women deans from 
Colorado and Wyoming in Denver 
Friday. The meeting was called in 
connection with the work of the 
Colorado Educational Association. 

Professor Frank M. Okey talked 
on "Reclamation" at the meeting of 
the Kinnikinnik chapter of the 
Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion on Tuesday afternoon. 

"The Provicial Basis of Patriot- 
ism" was the topic discussed by 
Professor Archer B. Hulbert at the 
meeting of the American Associa- 
tion of University Women on Wed- 
nesday afternoon. 

Miss Eleanor Schaff entertained 
Miss Mary Margaret Mathias, at 
McGregor Hall on Friday evening. 



'Better Equipped Than Ever 
To Handle College Trade." 



CAMPBELL'S 

BARBER SHOP 



109 East Pikes Peak Avenue 



Broken Lenses Duplicated 

Save the Pieces 

Eyes examined Lenses Ground 




THE LAUTERMAN-DUGAN 

JEWELRY AND OPTICAL CO. 

Jewelers, Optometrists and 

Mfg. Opticians 

Fine Watch, Clock and Jewelry 

Repairing 
121 N. Tejon St. Phone Main 674 



'You're Sure They're Pure" 



Caramels 
at 35c lb. 



One of the most popu- 
lar of Derngood Satur- 
day Candy features to 
offer for Saturday, the 
16th. 



26 S. Tejon 



Dern's 



THE 

WHITE WAY 

SYSTEM 

Open Until 2 A. M. 

Try our delicious White 
Way Chili 

Snappy Curb Service 

1 1 N. Tejon St. 



This week's Candy Special 
Chocolates 40 C ID. 



Barthel'S 

Tejon Street at 
Acacia Park Comer 



THE TIGER 



REX HOTEL 

Colorado Springs 




Here's Your 

VICTOR 
RECORD 



RADIO 

Victor, Majestic 

Freed, Atwater 

Kent and 

Croslcy 

113-115 N. Tcjon 



Come in and hear 
the latest releases in 
our ventilated trial 



$; 



ggHgss 

FVRNITVRE ^^. 







OTHE 
CAME 



In a Saunders System car, and take 
a gang of rooters with you. Make 
'em kick in for a share of the ex- 
pense and all travel for less than 
railway fare. Ask about low long 
trip rates on Model A Fords and 
new Chryslers. 



D. C. Hutchings, Mgr. 

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 

Phone Main 1800 

21 No. Cascade Ave. 



SAUNDERS 



Yourself] 



SYSTEM 



\WiemeJi^yoti^lf j 



E. L. Bruce 

BARBER SHOP 

28 E. Kiowa 



Women Give Christmas 
Playlet For Barnes 

Eager Heart, the lovely Christ- 
mas play is to be given again this 
year under the direction of Mrs. 
Beatrice Barnes, professor of dra- 
matics and expression. 

The play centers around a lovely 
medieval miracle showing the re- 
turn of Joseph and Mary on Christ- 
mas Eve to the cottage of Eager 
Heart, a young girl. 

The parts are all played by co- 
eds, and any women who are in- 
terested please call Mrs. Barnes. 
Mrs. Barnes is anxious to have a 
large number of women in the try- 
outs. 



Marcel Dupriz Renders 
Select Organ Recital 

The first evening recital in Con- 
nection with the Grace Church 
Memorial organ recital which was 
given this last Tuesday evenmg at 
the Grace Church by the eminent 
French organist and composer. Mar- 
cel Dupri, proved to be one of the 
most unusal musical treats this city 
has enjoyed. Marcel Dupre is re- 
cognized as one of the world's 
greatest organists. Since the early 
age of 12 he has won many rated 
prizes and honors and has held 
some of the most prominent organ 
positions in Europe. The Colorado 
Springs audience which included 
many Colorado College students, 
was especially enthusiastic over his 
playing of certain Back seclections, 
for which he is particularly famous 
and his playing of his own composi- 
tion Second Symphony in C sharp 
Minor; which is being given it's 
first performance in the states on 
this tour. 



Koshare Players Will 
Give Ibsen Production 



f r>r„it.i nued from page 3) 

to all the characters. 

Hear the grandiloquent tirades 
of Hialmer, the husband, which are 
borne by his wife in a quiet but in- 
tense desire to have the home. 

Find out how Dr. Relling seeks 
to cure his patients by creating for 
them a "life-delusion" — does it 
work? 

Are 'ideals' and 'lies' synony- 
mous? Does truth matter? Come 
and hear what this play has to say 
about it. 

With such a play, cast and direc- 
tor, "The Wild Duck" will be a 
dramatic sensation. It will be pre- 
sented in Cogswell Theatre, Bemis 
Hall, tonight (Friday) at 8:15 and 
tomorrow (Saturday) at 7:15. 
The early hour is to allow students 
to see the play before attending 
other activities of the evening. Ad- 
mission 50c. 



33 more shopping 
days until Christmas 




GARAGE TIRE SERVICE 

CORDUROY CORDS 

Sidewall Protection 



Frank GeddySays-- 

EAT 'EM UP TIGERS 

The Shoe Shop 

Across from the High School 



You will Look and Feel Better 
after seeing us. 

Elk Barber Shop 

122 East Pikes Peak 



AMERICA 

WEEK OF NOV. 17 




SHOWS AT 
1_3: 30—6: 00— 8:30 



for hot, clean 

clinkerless fuel 

— call the "coal phone' 

M 577 




COAL/ 



PAUDRE-PAUFFE 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Permanent Finger and Watei 
Waving 
Manicure and Scalp Treatmen 
Marcels 50c. 



II 



OWARD'S 

BARBER 
SHOP 



19 East Bijou Street 



FRANK SARLAS & C 

Shoe Shining and Repairing 

Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Quick Service 

132 E. Pikes Peak 



The Ice Cream 
that's a C. C. 
"Institution" 

The between Class "Cones" 
t h e sandwich materials a n ( 
candy, the ice creams and ice 
for class and club functions. 

From Frosh to Grad it's t h i 
place every Tiger knows. 

MoWRY'S 

Across from Campus 

Main 1183, 1184 



The place to meet for Good Things to Eat ! 

COLLEGE INN 

J. C. CULLEY, Prop. 



THE TIGER 



COVERS 
ALL THE FIELD 



SPORTS 



FOOTBALL 
CROSS COUNTRY EQUITATION 



WESTERN STATE TRIMS 
TIGER CUB GRIDDERS 



With the close of the football 
season less than two weeks away 
and with three hard games remain- 
ing on the schedule of the Colorado 
College Tigers, Coach Bully Van 
de Graaff and his assistants are 
grooming their charges for their 
last home encounter, and inciden- 
tally, the last appearance of "The 
Flving Dutchman" on Washburn 
Field. 

From all indications. Western 
State College under the able coach- 
ing of Stuart Clark, has the best 
rounded team it has ever had and 
they have plenty of scrap. The 
time was when Western State's 
game was looked upon as a mere 
practice encounter, but it is no 
more — the Mountaineers are to be 
feared just as much as most teams 
in the Eastern Division, with the 
possible exception of the Colorado 
Aggies. 

Coach Van de Graaff plans a 
shakeup in his lineup Saturday and 
will probably start an entirely dif- 
ferent combination. Because of 
the remarkable showing made by 
Chuck Irmn in the Utah Univer- 
sity game, he is almost sure of a 
regular starting berth for the re- 
mainder of the season. Eddie Hart- 
man's stellar performance also will 
warrant him to start Saturday. 
Coupled with these two will prob- 
ably be "Ritz" Pomeroy, and Cap- 
tain Dutch Clark, Colorado Col- 
lege's All-American quarterback 
and Thinker. The speedy Akin will 
probably start Saturday at an end 
with Don Warning, who has not 
had much chance, but has proved 
his metal against the two Utah 
teams. From tackle to tackle the 
teams will remain intact, the two 
Starbuck brothers holding down the 
tackle positions, McGrory and Hay- 
den the guards and "Doc" Weaver 
at center. 

If these men should not come 
through with the showing that they 
s,hould. Bully has a wealth of re- 
serve material on the bench. In- 
graham will probably get to play 
some, as his knee is some better 
than last week, but Coach would 
like to have it entirely well for the 
Boulder game a week from Satur- 
day and is therefore giving Inky 
much rest. 




Don Warning, who turned in a 
creditable game at an end position 
against the Redskins last Saturday. 



Hoopsters Get 
First Session 



Jt may be close upon football, 
but ihe time has come for basket- 
ball to take the court! Coach Her- 
igstsd held the first practice of the 
season Wednesday evening. Until 
further notice, it will be held night- 
ly at 8 o'clock in Cossitt gym. 

Seven lettermen wilJ be back in 
the lii)e-up. Rex, Doyle and Waters 
are the veterans who have appear- 
ed to uate. The other lettermen. 
Captain Clark, Hinkley, Ingraham 
and Reid, will not report for prac- 
tice until the week after Thanks- 
giving, when football season is 
ended. 

Among the new men who worked 
out Wednesday night were Grant, 
lanky Golden star; Chaney, former 
St. Joseph, Mo., ace; Allison, 
South Denver; Ryerson, South 
Denver; Van Dyke, Short, Dial, 
Baker, .Smith, Camp, Ferryman and 
several others. 



AGGIES PRAISE CLARK 



" 'Dutch' Clark isn't so hot." 
This seemed to be a favorite ex- 
pression after the game last Sat- 
urday, when as a matter of fact 
there was hardly an Aggie rooter 
whose heart didn't jump every time 
number "7" took the ball. A man 
who is watched as closely as that 
phantom was watched and can still 
play that kind of ball is surely all- 
American. And we can say that 
we are proud to have seen him but 
more proud that our team was the 
first to hold him scoreless in three 
years. — Student Life (Utah Ag- 
gies). 



BENGALS BATTLE UTAH 
IN HOMECOMING FRAY 



By Chauncey Blodgett, Jr. 
Eleven fighting Tigers, represent- 
ing Colorado College, went down in 
a glorious defeat last week when 
they fought the Utah U. crimson 
tide for four quarters of pure and 
hard football, to hold them to the 
lowest score of any team in the 
conference, 3-12. With the odds 
five and six to one, against them, 
the Bengals went out on the field 
with the intention of stopping 
Utah, and wath two short excep- 
tions, they did. 

It wasn't Clark against Utah in 
that game — it was every man on the 
crew that played the game. Pom- 
eroy, the Utes' biggest threat, and 
Summerhays, were both hit hard 
and often — and their yardage was 
down to a minimum. Four times 
the Indians had touchdowns on ice, 
and four times the Tigermen 
stopped them when another yard 
would have been victory. With one 
other touchdown, the Utes hit an- 
other stone wall, and were forced 
to try a field goal — which went 
wide. 

The Tigers scored in the first few 
plays, with a field goal, by Clark. 
The impetus given the team by 
scoring first, no doubt was of great 
value, but the way those boys were 
playing Saturday seeined to show 
that they could play that way any- 
how, first score or no score. 



Euterpe Musicians 

Enjoy Varied Program 



The Enterpe Musical Society met 
in Perkin's Hall, Room 13, on 
Tuesday evening, November 5th. 
Mrs. Reutlinger was hostess and 
after the program she served dainty 
refreshments appropiatc for Hal- 
low'en. 

The program was as follows: 
Piano 

Spring Song , Markel 

Patriotic Song Grieg 

Vona Brown 
Reading 

If I can Be By Her 

The Letter 

Jack Kintz 
Piano 

Sonata, Op. "51 Beethoven 

Beryl Griswald 
Radio Selections 

Lecture Dean Hale 

The next meeting will be held in 
Perkins Hall on November 19th ' 



CADILLAC 

and 

CHRYSLER 

MOTOR CARS 

Adams Motor Co. 

Marksheffel Building 



The Trip that Bankrupts the 
English Language 

CORLEY 

Mt. Highway 

Cripple Creek in high gear 



T. J. Collier T. M. Collier 

V. L. Collier 

TheCOLLIER 

LUMBER CO. 

Phone Main 386 
543 W. Colorado Ave. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



WHY NOT 

Learn Typewriting 
while attending Col- 
lege? Your teachers 
will appreciate type- 
written work to be 
checked. We can ar- 
range hours to suit 
your convenience. 



¥ 






^i!ijll^^' 



'•f<;. 






?J 



10 



THE TIGER 




S er vices f o r your 
car that includes 

Proper Lubrication 

100% Alemite 

LEADING MOTOR OILS 

Weaverized Washing 

Tire Repairing Road Service 

Drive in Today 



FIRESTONE TIRES 
117 N. Nevada Phone M. 202 



%OMtllk 




TENT 6( AWNING CO. 



Awnings and Camp Supplies 



PLAZA 

DINING 
ROOM 

"The Place to Eat" 

Breakfast Luncheon 

Dinner 



The Wise 
Advertise 



REX HOTEL 

Colorado Springs 



HUGHES' 
CHOCOLATES 

Try our Saturday 
SPECIALS 



Personals 



Miss Barbara Garmes of Grand 
Junction was the guest of Marian 
Coles at McGregor last week end. 

Mary Potter of the last year's 
graduating class was a guest at 
Bemis last Saturday. 

Miss E. Scilley was guest of 
Elizabeth Sweetman; Miss K. Mc- 
Cleary, the guest of Eleanor Mc- 
Cleary, Helen Morris, the guest of 
Hazel Biddlecome, and Miss Corey 
Corey was the guest of June Rosen 
at Bemis Hall over the week-end. 

Sarabell Weintraub entertained 
her sister at Tichnor during the 
Homecoming Celebration. 

Miss Rosela Burbanks enter- 
tained Isabelle McAuley at Ticknor 
last week. 



Miss Melba Adams had as her 
guests Miss Eva Lamar and Ruth 
Adams of Pueblo Saturday and 
Sunday. 

Mrs. Elmore Floyd, Trinidad, vis- 
ited her daughter, Harriet at Mc- 
Gregor Hall last week. 

Albert H. Daehler, professor of 
English, addressed the Quill Club 
Thursday afternoon. His subject 
was "The Writer's Training." 

Mrs. Myrde C. Bridges played 
Beethoven's Sonato Pathetique and 
gave a sketch of the composer and 
an interpretation of the composi- 
tion. She also gave a reading, "A 
Sisterly Scheme." 

Maxine Cooley, formerly a feat- 
ture writer on the Tiger staff, is 
writing news for the Silver and 
Gold at the University of Colorado. 



Stores Give Show Windows to 
Endowment Campaign Committee 



Illustrating in a spectacular fash- 
ion the work accomplished at Colo- 
rado College, 10 departments of 
the college are to have window dis- 
plays in downtown stores as one of 
the educational features of the en- 
dowment drive which is to be 
launched here next week. A com- 
mittee of which W. W. Postle- 
thwaite is the chairman, has made 
arrangements for the use of t h e 
downtown window display space. 

The windows will be decorated 
Sunday and will be on view to the 
public early Monday. 

The following departments of the 
college will arrange window dis- 
plays; Chemistry, biology, geology, 
physics, art, library, museum, en- 
gineering, forestry and athletics. 

In addition to the departmental 
displays, a big window at the Cham- 
ber of Commerce, where campaign 
headquarters have been established, 
will be devoted to a panorama de- 
picting the growth of Colorado 
College. It will be divided into 
three periods, showing the college 
in 1879 with one building, small 
student body and a few underpaid 
members of the faculty; in 1929, 
with its present plant and student 
body of about 640; and, in 1939, 
as the college will look when the 
endowment drive has been put 
over successfully. 

A big banner, 50 feet in width, 
will be swung across Pikes Peak 



avenue today between the Chamber 
of Commerce and the Elk hotel. On 
the banner will be the slogan : "A 
Greater Colorado College, a Greater 
Colorado Springs." It also will car- 
ry the campaign dates, November 
19-22, and the local objective of 
$100,000 a year for a period of 
five years. 



MENTAL HYGIENE EXPERT 
WILL ADDRESS STUDENTS 



Dr. Arthur H. Ruggles, well 
known authority on mental hygiene, 
will address the student assembly 
at a special assembly, Friday on 
"The Mental Hygiene of College 
Life." 

Dr. Ruggles has had long experi- 
ence in teaching and lecturing in 
psychiatry. He received his A. B. 
and A. M. degrees at Dartmouth, 
and his M. D. at Harvard. After 
leaving Harvard, he studied for a 
year at the University of Munich. 
He has been superintendent in the 
Butler Hospital since 1920. At 
Yale, he has been consultant in 
mental hygiene, and a lecturer in 
psychiatry. He has been president 
of the Rocky Island Society for 
Mental Hygiene since 1920; is an 
ex-president of the New England 
Psychiatry Society; and is the 
chairman of the executive commit- 
tee of the National Committee for 
Mental Hygiene. 



— * 



ACACIA HOTEL 
BARBER SHOP 

EXPERT HAIR CUTTING 
Main 2440 



Hey-Service 

The 
HEYSE SHEET 
METAL WORKS 

INC. 

219 N.Weber 
Main 552 



W. I. Lucas 

HAS 
EVERYTHING IN 

SPORTING GOODS 

"Tigers always welcome" 

119 N. Tejon St. 
Main 900 



Photographs of our Colorado 
mountains. Nicely made — 
attractively colored by hand. 
Moderate in price — framed 
or unframed. 

H. L. STANDLEY 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs 



DUTCH 

for touchdowns and DUTCH 
(Hammond) for new driver- 
less cars. 

New Fords 7c per mile; 
30c per hour. 

New Cheve Six's 8c per mile; 
35c per hour. 

Office 

ELK HOTEL 

Phones M. 346 and 2065 
Free Delivery 



THE TIGER 



15 



A SERVICE 
Evrey for Purse 



THE 
PEARL LAUNDRY 



BUICK MOTOR CARS 



Strang's 



Harry D. MacDonald 
President 



THE J. S. BROWN 

MERCANTILE 

COMPANY 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



Made in Colorado Springs 

VAN BRIGLE 
ART POTTERY 

The world's most famous 
art pottery. 

Visitors always welcome. 



Wear a Tiger "Woolie" and "Mum' 
to the Game. 




Business Students 

Hold Luncheon Sunday 



Alpha Kappa Psi held a meeting 
for its Alumni Sunday noon at 
Cossitt Hall in order that the 
Alumni back for homecoming 
could get acquainted and meet with 
the active chapter. Professor 
Drucker gave a very interesting talk 
on alumni relations w^ith the chap- 
. A few of the Alumni gave 
short talks on how actual business 
differed from the theory taught in 
text books. The Alumni decided 
to organize in Colorado Springs 
and to form a graduate group to 
meet and aid the active chapter in 
its work. The next regular meet- 
ing will be held on Thursday even- 
ing, November 21, at Cossitt Hall. 



30 N. Tejon Phone M. 214 



Rhone Main 1710 

IDEAL 

1 CLEANERS 

5 West Colorado Ave. 



Valetor Pressing Service 



Betas Place First in 
Homecoming Day Parade 

The prize for the best float in 
the Homecoming parade last Sat- 
urday was awarded to the Beta 
Theta Pi fraternity for their float, 
"Good Tiger Meat." The float 
represented a Tiger emerging from 
a tepee crunching the bnes of a 
hapless Ute Indian who had re- 
sided therein. 

Honorable mention was awarded 
to the following organizations: 
Minerva, for their float which rep- 
resented a bullet airplane which 
was to "Fly into Utah"; the Phi 
Gamma Delta float, which held 
Fort Washburn against the Utes; 
and the Hypatia float, which pic- 
tured a gaudily painted chieftain 
bowing to a beautiful girl. 

The Contemporary float was en- 
titled "A Touchdown to Down 
Utah." Two Kappa Sigma cake- 
makers displayed such signs as 
"We Knead this game." Phi Del- 
ta Theta depicted the evolution of 
C. C. Homecoming parades from 
1909 to 1929. The Crescent Club 
had an immense shoe which was 
entitled "Boot Utah." The Delta 
Alpha Phi showed "A Tiger Feast" 
of an Indian. A swarm of Sigma 
Chi Indians were overcome by a 
lone C. C. football man. The Zet- 
alethians "Held The Redskins 
Line." The Pi Kaps carried a cof- 
fin in a "Beat Utah Ford." 

Alumni floats showed the cam- 
pus of Colorado College when there 
was one building with no endow- 
ment to the present buildings with 
a $2,500,000 endowment, and the 
expectations with a $5,000,000 en- 
dowment. The Associated Women 
students also entered a float, and 
the high school and college bands 
also took part in the parade. 



Read the 
I G E R ADS 



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CRISSEY-FOWLER 

LUMBER COMPANY 



117 W. Vermijo 



Main 101 



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SUPERIOR 

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Telephone 1364 129 N. Tejon 



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FOR YOUR PARTIES OR PICNICS 



Let us supply you with 
good thbgs to eat 



123 North Tejon 



Phone 2602 



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THE TIGER 



COSSITT 
DINING HALL 



Back your College 

in every good thing 

— even in eating 




THE COST IS MODERATE 
FOR THE BEST OF MEALS 



WEEKLY RATE $7.25 
Credit for Single Meals 







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On To Boulder! 




THE FIRST SPECIAL TRAIN for Colorado College football fans to be run this 
year will go to Boulder tomorrow for the Colorado College - University of Colorado 
football game. Many students, fearing bad weather and remembering the Boulder spe- 
cial of two years ago, expect to make the trip by train. The train leaves Colorado 
Springs from the Santa Fe station at 9 o'clock Saturday morning and will arrive in 
Boulder at 1:30. 






■M 




Office of Pabllcatlon: 23 West Colorado Ave., Colorftdo Sprinsip Colo. 



THE TIGER 



Have You Tried Those 

DeliciousToasted 
Sandwiches 

at 

TheMURRAY 
Drug Co. 

21S. Tejon 832 N. Tejon 




"FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE' 

We Dry Clean 

Ladies' ^ — : "Phone us first" 

Dresses 
Furs 
Gloves 
Hats 
Scarfs 
Etc. 

M. 2958 




Gents' 
Hats 
Topcoats 
Tuxedos 
Gloves 
Ties 

Sweaters 
Etc. 



Phane Main 4671 



831 North Tejon 



A. L. STARK 

TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 

COLORADO SPRINGS 



Dine and Dance at the 

COLLEGE INN 

J. C. CULLEY, Prop. 




Vdvet Collars are SMAKT in 

lp)erhins=Sbearer 

©vercoats 

Yale wears them, Princeton wears them, 
Michigan wears them. They are the sea- 
son's most fashionable fashion, so to speak. 
We have them — and plenty of them. 
$35 and up. 

PERKINS- SHEARER CO. 



Issued Friday of each week. Entered at the Post Uttice 



at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter. 



VOLUME XXXII 






Colorado College Weekly News Magazine 



Number 10 



ENDOWMENT HAS GOOD 
START TOWARD GOAL 



Daily Progress Sheet States That 

Annual Quota Will Be Met 

Before Drive Is Over 



As we go to press, the campaign 
for the endowment of a greater 
Colorado College is just opening in 
Colorado Springs. Early reports 
show every indication that the 
workers are determined to win. 

Mr. Bursell, who is executive 
chairman of the campaign, told a 
Tiger reporter in an interview: 
"Stock fluctuations may interfere 
somewhat with immediate returns, 
but assurance has come from the 
leaders that Colorado Springs will 
certainly raise its quota which is 
$100,000 for five years, and thus 
take its share of the burden." 

One of the features of the Colo- 
rado College drive is the coopera- 
tion of the Colorado Springs mer- 
chants in installing window displays. 
These displays give a graphic des- 
cription of the work performed in 
the various departments of the col- 
lege. Under the leadership of W. 
W. Postlethwaite, this work has 
been arranged by members of the 
faculty and their assistants. 

Every day during the campaign a 
humorous sheet, reporting the pro- 
gress of the drive will be published. 
These are sent to people especially 
interested in the endowment. 

With the people of Colorado 
Springs behind it, and under the 
leadership of such tireless workers, 
the endowment fund can't help but 
make Colorado College, greater and 
stronger and finer. 



College Catalogues On 
File At Coburn Library 

Catalogues from most of the col- 
leges and universities of the United 
States are on file in Coburn libra- 
ry. There are others in the Ad- 
ministration Building. Colorado 
College has an exchange list with 
many schools, and endeavors to 
keep catalogues of all western and 
mid-western colleges on file. 

Some of the catalogues are 
bound in the college colors. It is 
becoming a general practice among 
the larger universities, to issue sep- 
arate catalogues for each depart- 
ment. 

Miss Kampf, librarian, says that 
the catalogues of Colorado College 
are most likely to disappear. It is 
especially difficult to keep a Uni- 
versity of Colorado catalogue. 



Christian Club 
Formed Among 
Men Students 



The C. C. Christian Association 
was organized at a meeting in the 
Administration building Friday, No- 
vember 1 5th. This Association will 
exist for the purpose of promoting 
Christian fellowship among the 
men of this college, and to insti- 
gate and encourage meetings and 
conferences with men of other 
Colorado schools. 

Paul Conover was chosen Presi- 
dent and Arthur Baylis, Vice-Presi- 
dent, at this initial meeting. 

Lyman Hoover is in charge of 
promoting s 'u c h organizations 
among the schools of Colorado. He 
was here last Friday. 

Membership to this organization 
is open to every man in Colorado 
College. Further meetings of the 
C. C. Christian Association will be 
posted. Those present Friday 
were: Paul Vestal, Stewart Wilson, 
Lyman Hoover, Winthrop Crouch, 
John Smith, A. P. R. Drucker, Ed- 
win Engstrom, W. D. Copeland, Ar- 
thur Baylis, Paul Conover, Heman 
Bull, Francis Burshears and Marion 
Deutsch. 

Students, who are interested in 
social work, boy leadership, or in 
Y. M. C. A. work should see Paul 
Conover concerning membership in 
the organization. 



FORESTRY CLOD GETS 

HRST OF NEW PINS 



Describing the growth of Colo- 
rado College in the last 30 years, 
Myron S. Collins, president of the 
Colorado Springs Chamber of Com- 
merce, in a talk before the Rotary 
Club last week made an appeal to 
the busmess men to support t h e 
Colorado College endowment drive 
being put on now. Mr. Collins at- 
tended Colorado College 30 years 
ago and since that time ,has watched 
with interest the growth and devel- 
opments it has made. He told how 
the faculty and students had been 
spending a million dollars a year in 
the city and that with an increased 
enrollment of 1000 students that 
amount will be increased one-half. 
"We want and must have a well 
rounded community here," Mr. Col- 
lins stated. "We cannot devote all 
our interests to the tourist business, 
to climate and health conditions, or 
to the college but we must have a 



TIGERS ARE PRIMED TO OVERTURN 
COLORADO FIELD JINX TO-MORROW 

By T. E. Nowels, Jr. 
Playing their last game of the 1929 season, the Colorado Univer- 
sity gridsters will be ready to "shoot the works" and give everything 
they have when they tangle with the Colorado College Bengals on Colo- 
rado field in Boulder Saturday. 

The Boulder season has not been as successful as it might have 
j been, and they are still smarting under the 40-0 defeat handed them by 
the Utah Redskins several weeks ago. They are determined, however, 
to show the Tigers that that defeat 
was unjustifiable. The Boulderites 
are fresh from a 6-0 defeat of 
Colorado Aggies, whom the Tigers 
defeated 14-13 early in the season, 
and with their squad intact and 
without injuries, they are ready to 
put up their best scrap of the year 
against the Jungaleers. 

Many a moon has passed since 
the Tigers defeated State on Colo- 
rado field, and the Tigers are as 
equally determmed to turn the 
tables and "Beat Boulder." With 
a vision toward the Colorado State 
championship and a second place 
in the Rocky Mountain Conference 
providing they win both of their re- 
maining games, the Tigers are wil- 
ling to exert every effort toward 
repelling the Boulderites. 

Needless to say, "The Flying 
Dutchman", Earl Harry Clark, 
Colorado College's All-American 
Quarterback, will be in his prime. 
The first time he played on Colo- 
rado Field, the Tigers were nosed 
out 7-6 in a heartbreaking game, 
but Dutch thinks differently this 
year. Both teams will be free from 
inj'uries, with the possible excep- 
tion of Ingraham's knee, and ready 
to fight it out to a finish. The 
writer makes no predictions on the 
outcome of the game, because it 
will hang in the air until the final 
gun is sounded. 



The Pikes Peak Forestry Club 
pin is worn by students of forestry 
€.t Colorado College. The pin is of 
solid gold and is emblematic of a 
graduated caliper and the cross sec- 
tion of a log. The letters, P. P. F. 
C, which stand for Pikes Peak For- 
estry Club, are inscribed on the pin. 
A felt emblem of the same type is 
also worn by forestry stusents. 

George Case, a major in forestry, 
is president of the forestry club this 
year. The club is under the super- 
vision of Prof. Gordon Parker, head 
of the department of forestry. 

Plans are being made for the 
Forestry Club's annual jaiunt up 
Pikes Peak. This climb is under- 
taken to prove the members of the 
club are true foresters. 



Collins Tells Club of College History 



well rounded community and the 
college is one of our best assets. 

He said that the advertising giv- 
en to Colorado Springs by Colo- 
rado College and Dutch Clark could 
not be paid for in money. Each 
year many people are brought to 
Color?do Springs to live because 
they can educate their children here 
and take advantage of the other 
things offered. 

"The college must have a larger 
endowment to enlarge and improve 
its personnel, larger and better 
buildings for the enlarged student 
body, and it is up to Colorado 
Springs to support its merits. Too 
many of us take Colorado College 
as a matter of course but now we 
m'ljst begin to think of it as closer 
and nearer to us than that." 

Mr. Collins is helping to organ- 
ize the campaign which will make 
for a greater Colorado College. 



Constitution Passed 

In Thursday Meeting 

The new constitution, which was 
revised by the Associated Student 
Council was voted on a a special 
assembly held Thursday morning. 
There were 165 votes cast for the 
constitution, and 69 against it. This 
being a majority, the new constitu- 
tion will be adopted. 

At the meeting, prizes were 
aw?rded to the Beta Theta Pi fra- 
ternity and the Phi Gamma Delta 
fraternity, respectively, for their 
float and house decorations during 
Homecoming. A pep meeting end- 
ed the assembly hour. 



THE TIGER 



SUPERIOR 

Dry Cleaning Co. 

Telephone 1364 129 N. Tejon 



FOR PLUMBING AND HEATING WORK 

Phone BUMSTEAD'S ^ 

"Where Your Dollars Have More Cents" 



5 N. Tejon 



121/2 N. Nevada 



2 SHOPS 



Quality Lunch 



TRY OUR HAMBURGERS AND CHILI 
Orders over $1.00 delivered free. 



M. 1784 



M. 1463-J 



WAGNER-FULTS STUDIO 

Bums Theatre Bldg. 
Exclusive Photographers for the 

PIKES PEAK NUGG 



E T 




Have You Joined 
This Society? 



If you're from out of town you're eligible 
and — there's no initiation fee. To be a member 
just arrange with Mother and Dad to telephone 
them once each week. It's more satisfactory 
than letters and not expensive. All you need do 
is give the operator your home telephone num- 
ber to get the lowest rate — tell her you'll talk 
with anyone who answers. 

Calls Can Be Made "Collect" if You Prefer 



The Mountain States 
TELEPHONE & Telegraph Co. 



INTRAMURAL SWIMMING 
MEET TO BE HELD SOON 



Preliminary plans are being' com- 
pleted for the inter-fraternity swim- 
ming meet which will be held some- 
time in the first week of December. 
At the present time. Kappa Sigma 
holds first place in the tournament 
due to their work in the horseshoe 
and tennis matches, with the Phi 
Gams, Sigma Chis, and Phi Delts 
runners up. 

According to the plans drawn up 
for the swimming meet, there wall 
be eight events. A fraternity is 
eligible to enter only one man in an 
event. A point system has been 
worked out so that any fraternity 
still has a chance to win the cup 
for the complete tournament if 
they win the swimming meet. 



STOCK BROS. 

Food Store 

, 119 East Colo. Ave. 

Fancy Dry Picked Turkeys, 
Pascal Celery, Plum Pudding 
and etc. for your 

THANKSGIVING DINNER 

Main 4303 and 4304 



Collegiate Program Is 
Featured By Old Gold 

This is "college week" with the 
Old Gold-Paul Whiteman hour. The 
program given Tuesday evening, 
November 19th was dedicated to 
collegians everywhere and featured 
football songs, varsity melodies and 
the latest campus dance hits. In- 
cluded in Paul Whiteman's varsity 
song-bag was a medley of eight 
famous college tunes, a special ar- 
rangement called "Collegiana" and 
the grand old fraternity waltz, 
"Sweetheart of Sigma Chi." 



Official Notices 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 
ATTENTION 



According to a report from Dean 
C. B. Hershey, Professor James L. 
Tryon, Chairman of the Committee 
on Admissions of the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts, will visit 
Colorado College on Saturday. He 
will interview seniors and other ad- 
vanced students who might be in- 
terested in continuing their techni- 
cal work at the Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology after gradua- 
tion from Colorado College. Any 
students interested in seeing Pro- 
fessor Tryon should see Dean Her- 
shey. 

SPECIAL NOTICE 
All students should remember 
that the stub in their student pass 
book will not admit them to t h e 
Colorado College - Colorado School 
of Mines game. The ticket must 
be exchanged at the Treasurer's 
Office at the Administration build- 
ing, with a payment of 50 cents for 
an admission ticket. Exchange 
dates are November 25, 26, and 27 
only. 



H 



OWARD'S 

BARBER 
SHOP 



19 East Bijou Street 



The Colorado Planing 
Mill Co. 

MILL WORK OF ALL 
DESCRIPTIONS 

PADDLES 
Frank Mitchell, Manager 

Phone 2876-W 
525 W. Colorado Ave. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 




Phoenix for 
Sox Appeal 

Mighty appealing in appear- 
ance are the new patterns of 
Phoenix wool hose — but 
when the I\»ercury begins to 
tumble, yea bo, that's really 
when this wool hosiery has 
5OX appeal. 

50c 75c 

$!.00 

"Trade with the Boys" 
Pikes Peak at Nevada 



THE TIGER 



Play Presents Playful Pupils 
Pranks on Public Tram — & Results 



TIGERS NEAR POINT A 
MINUTE PERFORMANCE 

Playing a driving game that 
broke down the weaker Western 
State line and outwitted their de- 
fense the Colorado college Tigers 
ran thru their opponents almost at 
will last week, and took the game 
by the lopsided score of 54-21. 

The Gunnison crew showed a 
dazzling passing attack, but it was 
not enough to balance the playing 
of Clark, while he was in and the 
stellar ground gaining of the Tiger 
backfield, which sliced off heavy 
gains thru the line and around the 
ends. Practically every man on the 
squad saw service in the game. 

Hartman proved to be one of the 
stars of the game, he and Akin 
gaining many yards thru the wall. 
The whole backfield not only shone 
on offense, but also on defense. 

The line came up to the form 
that they showed against Utah and 
stopped the spasmodic drives of the 
mountaineers whenever they threat- 
ened at all. 

Western State did not open their 
fast aerial attack until the last heat, 
and the Tigers were unable to stop 
them for any length of time. They 
put over three counters in this time, 
and the Bengals were still trying to 
fathom their attack when the final 
gun went off. 

Jones, who was knocked out in 
the first half, returned to the game 
in the closing minutes of play, but 
carried the ball only once, gaining 
35 yards. The rest of the squad 
were taken in and out of the en- 
counter often, 20 men getting action 
before the game was over. 

The team came off the field in 
good condition, and will be in the 
best shape when they leave for 
Boulder, and the game that prom- 
ises to decide the state collegiate 
title. 



Wade, Blunt, Brown, 
Robinson Get Publicity 

Several Colorado College stu- 
dents are taking an active part in 
the Young American football move- 
ment that is attracting so much at- 
tention all over the country. Harry 
Blunt is coaching the west side 
"Wolf Pack," Al Brown .the San 
Luis "Cubs," Glen Wade, the San 
Luis "Panthers," and Bud Robin- 
son is taking a "Ryder" at being 
head linesman. 



HERSNEY MAY SPEND 
VACATION IN GERMANY 



The Magistrate 
The Clerk 

George Pinckney Squirtz, a 
freshman 

Freshmen and spectators 



(The following action takes place 
in a police court m the basement 
of a city hall. It is a drab cheer- 
less room. At the front, in the fore- 
ground, are seats with their backs 
to the audience. In the background, 
facing the audience, are two desks. 
At the left, in the foreground, is 
the entrance to the court. Oppo- 
site it to the right is the entrance 
leading to the cells). 



Discovered: The magistrate and 
the clerk at the desks. A group 
of freshmen are huddled near the 
door at the left. The spectators 
are seated. 

Magistrate: (rapping on the 
desk) "The court is in session." 

Clerk: turning to the book be- 
fore him) "George Pinckney 
Squirtz." 

Voice from the group of fresh- 
men: "Here." 

Magistrate: "Will you stand be- 
fore the court?" 

(Squirtz comes forward and 
stands before the desk. He is 
dressed in an mconspicuous garb 
and carries a skull-cap of a bril- 
liant orange hue. He twists this 
nervously in his hands as he 
speaks). 

Clerk: "Accused of disturbing 
the peace." 

Magistrate: "What is your ans- 
wer?" 

Sqiuirtz: "Guilty." 

Magistrate: (Turning to the 
group of Freshmen) "You will all 
plead guilty, I suppose?" (There 
is a general murmur of assent). 
"Well before I pass judgment I 
must hear more about this case. 
Suppose you give us your part in 
this affair, Squirtz." 

Squirtz: "Well Your Honor, it 
was this way. After the parade 
Friday night we went out to get a 
street car to come home in. When 
we wouldn't pay our fares the mo- 
torman got sore and took the con- 
troller with him and went into a 
drugstore to call the police. I, and 
two others went with him. You see 
he couldn't find the number with- 
out his glasses. The rest all wait- 
ed in the car. After we got back 
we all waited until the wagon 
came. That was about 15 minutes. 
We all tried to get in but the of- 
ficer pushed some of us off the 



Dean C. B. Hershey has been in- 
vited to be one of a professional 
group of educators and teachers 
who will tour Germany studying the 
Prussian school system, this sum- 




mer. Dean Hershey is considering 
the invitation, but has made no 
definite decision concerning the 
proposed tour. 

The International Institute of 
Teacher's College of Columbia Uni- 
versity and the Zentralenletut fuer 
Erzuhung und Unterricht in Berlin 
have planned this tour for Ameri- 
can scholars and educators for the 
summer of 1930. The tour will be 
conducted under the auspices of the 
Prussian Ministry of Education and 
the Federal Ministry of the Interior. 

Hoping to give these educators 
first hand information concerning 
private, primary, and secondary 
schools, and schools of higher learn- 
ing, the Institute is organizing the 
tour so that it will not be an ordi- 
nary travel course, but will be a 
tour which will enable the teachers 
to see every type of the German 
schools. 



Faculty Heads 
Have Adorned 
Shop Windows 

In connection with the Colorado 
College endowment campaign a 
number of the departments in the 
college have arranged exhibits in 
store windows in the shopping dis- 
trict. 

Professor F. M. Okey, of the en- 
gineering department, has a display 
in Barnes-Woods Company show- 
ing the various instruments used in 
the work of his classes. 

The window of the Daniels Home 
Furnishing Company is used by Dr. 
J. R. Gilmore to show the develop- 
ment of the frog and the circula- 
tory system of the water-dog. 

Dr. F. W. Douglas and Professor 
0. A. Barnes have a very attractive 
exhibit at Kaufman's showing the 
apparatus used in chemical re- 
search. 

Coburn Library's exhibit at 
Kirkwood's, which has been ar- 
ranged by Miss L. F. Kampf, the 
librarian, contains a number of in- 
teresting books — many of them of 
historic interest in connection with 
Colorado and the West. 

Miss Susan F. Leaming has se- 
cured a window at the Out West 

(Continued on page 8) 



back steps and told us to walk over 
or wait until the next bus came. So 
we walked over and they took all 
of our names and told us to come 
back today. Here we are." 

Magistrate: "A clear case of 
Malum In Se." 

Clerk: (in a whisper) "What're 
you going to do?" 

Magistrate: "Ten dollars and 
costs." 

(Loud groans from freshmen). 

Magistrate: "Come now, pay or 
go to jail." 

Clerk: "We can't keep 'em here. 
We haven't room enough." 

Clerk: (in a whisper) "Make it 
a dollar." 

Magistrate: "One dollar or I'll 
lock you up for a week." 

(Slowly the freshmen file up 
and pay their fines then leave the 
court.) 

Magistrate: "Rhew, I'm glad 
they didn't choose to stay or we'd 
have been bankrupt just feeding 
them." 

Clerk: "Court's adjourned." 
THE END. 



Nickel Phones Removed 
From Halls By Council 

Greeley, Colo. — The administra- 
tion, the fraternities, and the soror- 
ities got together and managed to 
have the pay telephones removed 
from their buildings. The telephone 
company reserved for itself the tel- 
ephone in the Administration build- 
ing which will continue to cost five 
cents a call. However the student 
council took over this and will re- 
ceive twenty per cent of the profits 
on this one phone. 



Saunders, Fales And 

Wood Attend Meeting 

Humphrey Saunders, editor of 
The Nugget, Bill Fales, manager 
and Harry Wood, assistant manager 
attended the meetings of the Rocky 
Mountain Yearbook Association at 
Fort Collins last Friday and Satur- 
day. 

Yearbook Problems, relation of 
photography to yearbooks the pro- 
cess of photo-engraving, yearbook 
makeup, and the editorial policy 
were discussed at the meeting. In 
addition to these topics a number 
of round table discussions were 
held. The delegates were guests at 
the football game between the Colo- 
rado Aggies and Colorado Universi- 
ty. 



THE TIGER 



Member of Rocky Mountain 

Inter-CoUegiate Press 

Association 




The Colorado College 

Newspaper, 

Published Weekly by the 

Students. 



THE TIGER 



LLOYD H. ELLIS Main 1975 Editor 

James Keyser .Associate Editor Barratt O'Hara Desk Editor 

Chauncey H. Blodgett, Jr Sport Editor Margaret Gillen Society Editor 



Mark Perkinson 



Melba Adams 
William Baker 
Margery Barkley 
Art Baylis 
Arthur Bishop 
Carl Burke 
Margaret Crissman 



-Feature Editor John W. 
REPORTERS 



Haussermann, Jr Lit. Editor 



Marjorie Gilbert 
Frances Glau 
Clifford Goodson 
Wayne Campbell 
Effie Gilbert 
Marian MacMillan 
Marie Hagemeyer 



Wilmoth Harris 
Archie Hess 
Don Horton 
Hermina Kahn 
Fred Nichols 
T. E. Nowels 
Hartley Murray 



Velma Rose 
Marianna Sackett 
Ivan Schweninger 
Ralph Smith 
Kendrick Stone 
Tom Tate 
Clifford Vessey 



JAMES PATTERSON Main 2575 Manager 

Frank Dentan, Jr Advertising Manager 

Advertising — Harry Wood, Nelson Brown, Max Schmidt, Byron Whaley, Doc Gulick 
and Homer Bruce 

Merritt Ritter Circulation Manager 

Assistants — Glen Wade, Jack Fisher, Charlotte Pipkin, Elsie Winship, Marguerite 
Smith, Ruth Griffin and Margaretta Barr 



Articles intended for publication should be left in the Tiger Box, on the first 
floor of Coburn library, by Wednesday noon. No unsigned contributions will be 
published. 



FOOTBALL BROADCASTING. 

To many football fans of Colorado Springs, the announcement that 
the University of Colorado-Colorado College football game would not 
be broadcasted was a great disappointment. Due to business, work, and 
financial reasons, there are a number of Colorado College football fans 
who cannot give up a whole day to attend the football game on Satur- 
day. These people expected to be able to listen to the game over the 
radio. 

Graduate Manager Walter Franklin of the University of Colorado 
believes that the broadcasting of a football game keeps down the gate 
receipts. The gate receipts mmst always be considered, but how much 
the broadcasting will hurt attendance is a question. The use of radio 
in covering football games has brought a new interest to many radio 
fans. Newspapers have seen that the public wanted radio, and they 
have helped their advertising rivals by printing daily programs of the 
broadcasts. 

Franklin, however, is broadminded concerning his present stand. 
He has suggested that people write to him telling how they feel about 
his action. A letter written today might influence ihim for Saturday's 
game; at any rate, a late letter would help the situation in the future. 



COLLEGE ROWDYISM. 

It has been the custom of students to ride street cars following the 
annual evening pep meeting and parade from the business district to 
the college campus. Last year, a street car was damaged considerably 
and the Associated Student Council was forced to pay for the damage. 
The students, who rode the street car this year, should be commended 
for their orderly action last Friday. 

It IS only right for the street car company to take some action con- 
cerning this annual disturbance. They have expensive equipment to 
operate, and they have a service to maintain. This year, there were 
little grounds for complaint. But what has happened in the past and 
what might happen in the future led them to take some action. 

The police judge in Monday's court gave a fair judgment both to 
the company and to the college students. They were charged with dis- 
turbance, and the charge was not withdrawn. Every man that was in- 
volved in the fragus easily had a dollar's worth of entertainment cut 
of the torch parade, the picture shows, the street car episode, and the 
police court. Seriously, there was more to the episode than a dollar 
fine. About twenty men were given practical experience in the legal 
system of the courts, and the suspended fine ought to keep them out 
of court in the future. 

The police judge made several statements which are regarded true 
by too many people who have only a distant relationship with college 
students. We do not come to college alone for pep meetings and foot- 
ball games; that is only a small part of college. On five days a week 
we attend classes; on the sixth day, we may go to a football game. 
And the season lasts only for two months of the college. But one state- 
ment Judge Haines made concerning college students should be repeat- 
ed. Rowdyism should be avoided, not excused because the perpatrators 
are college students. 



Voice, of The. Stcdemt^ 



"Voice of the Students" hence- 
forth will be a regular department 
of The Tiger. Contributions are re- 
quested, but they must bear the 
author's actual narie, although if 
requested a non de plume will be 
used in publication. The length 
must not exceed 150 words. 



CAMPUS OPINION 



HEALTH 



It has been brought to my atten- 
tion that there is some misunder- 
standing of the aims of our Health 
Program, existing in the student 
body. 

Let me reiteratp what I stated in 
my chapel talk • — that we do not 
wish to interfere with the personal 
liberties of the students any fur- 
ther than consideration of the 
health of the whole student body 
makes such action necessary. Par- 
ticularly is this our attitude in the 
provision for weekly inspection of 
a'l dormitories and fraternity hous- 
es by the college nurse. Mrs. 
Montgomery will discharge this 
duty not in the role of a "snooper" 
intent upon meddling in matters 
which do not concern her, but in a 
friendly spirit such as might be dis- 
played by a house mother or inter- 
ested housekeeper. 

In regard to reporting illness: 
our plan contemplates that all cas- 
es of illness shall be reported to the 
college nurse, that she shall inves- 
tigate and report to the college 
physician all cases in which the ill- 
ness seems severe or about which 
she is in doubt, especially if she is 
suspicious that the disease is an in- 
fectious one. Dr. Bortree will be 
interested only in seeing that the ill 
student has proper medical care and 
that no infectious or contagious 
disease shall go unrecognized with 
consequent danger of an epidemic. 
The individual student is quite at 
liberty to call whatever physician 
he chooses and it is expected that 
he will do so whenever the illness 
is of such nature that the attend- 
ance of a physicirn is necessary. 

The nursing care given by Mrs. 
Montgomery is not compulsory and 
is given only when the student de- 
sires it or the physician requires it 
and is only for those students who 
are not living at home or with rel- 
atives. 

Trusting that this will clear up 
such misconceptions of our health 
program as may exist in the minds 
of some members of the student 
body and make the whole subject 
more clear, I remain 

Yours for a better C. C, 

J. T.Williams, M.D.,' 15, 
Chairman of Health Committee. 
November 16, 1929 . 



Perhaps this tirade may make 
you wonder what it is all about. 
Simply this: Koshare, struggling 
to do something worth while, did 
not receive enough support on the 
two nights which the "Wild Duck" 
was presented to fill that woefully 
inadeqruate theater, Cogswell. For- 
ty townspeople and professors saw 
the production the first night and 
on the second sixty came. On both 
nights there were not more than 
fifteen students all told. You have 
been told in English classes that 
Ibsen writes rather worth while 
plays. Why did you not take ad- 
vantage of this opportunity to find 
out for yourself? Can this be an 
example of the mentality of the in- 
tellectual cream of the country? If 
it is, as some famous man once 
said, "God help the skim milk." 

You cannot beg off on the ex- 
cuse that you did not have time to 
see for it was presented two nights 
and on the second it ended early 
enough that there was still suffici- 
ent time for those ever important 
social events. 

Was it price? Certainly not. 
Fifty cents will not break even a 
college student. Of course, we re- 
alize that with fifty cents you could 
see one of those enlightening shows 
with whioh our screen is swamped. 
Would it be possible to miss one of 
these masterpieces to see one of the 
inferior works of Hendric Ibsen? 
I'm afraid not, for an activity ever 
supported on this campus except 
football and in a less degree basket- 
ball and it takes heroic effort to 
have a turn out for these of which 
we are not ashamed. 

College life, spirit, and support 
is a wonderful thing and I'm proud 
to belong here. 

— A Disgruntled College Student. 



RED CROSS SERVICE 



The Red Cross has in the last 
few years been associated with ed- 
ucational programs in American 
schools. Today American Red 
Cross courses are being introduced 
also into Universities and Colleges, 
courses in swimming, life saving, 
rnd first aid are being given in 
these institutions under the super- 
vision of the American Red Cross. 
Women's colleges have adopted the 
Red Cross course in Home Hygiene. 
Care for the Sick and Nutrition. 

The annual drive to secure funds 
to further Red Cross work began 
on November 1 1 , and will last thru 
November 29. 



THE TIGER 



We Make a Specialty of 

CLEANING AND DYEING MEN'S 

AND WOMEN'S SHOES 

GOLDEN CYCLE SHINE PARLOR 

Todd Colbert 

Lobby Golden Cycle Bldg. 
Tejon and Pikes Peak 



HOLLY SUGAR 

is 
the Best 

Sugar the essential food. 

HOLLY SUGAR 
CORPORATION 



Under New Management 

The College 
Barber Shop 

Ralph Schildknecht, Proprietor 

103 E. Cache la Poudre 
Colorado Springs 



Quality 

Cleaners and Dyers 

SUITS, O'COATS 

HATS $1.25 

U-Fone 1-8-1-1 We'll Call 

H. A. Thompson 
10 E. Kiowa 



PLAZA HOTEL BEAUTY SHOP 
Finger wave — Marcels 

Permanent Waves 

Phone Main 2515 



i When you consider that you 
t can purchase any make type- 

! writer on monthly payments 
as small as $5.00 it b not a 
question of affording it. 
I The essential question is if 
I you can afford to be without 




SOCIETY 



Minerva Dance 

The Minerva society entertained 
at a dance at the club house, Fri- 
day evening, November 15. Mrs. 
W. R. Willis and Miss Amanda El- 
lis chaperoned. The guests were 
Catherine Hood, Marie Benning, 
Virginia Easton, Phyllis Ormsby, 
Olive Swan, Margaret Weinberger, 
Jerry Cogan, Ted Peck, Nelson 
Brown, Harold Harmon, Charles 
Cogan, Field Bohart, Marks Jail- 
lite, Al Giesecke, Roland Anderson, 
'Carter Hutchinson, James Simon, 
Jack Denney, Maurice Griffith, 
Marvin Russell, Gene Weinberger, 
Gilbert Rice, Mowbray Drummond, 
Bill Vorrieter, Chauncey Blodgett, 
T. Ernest Nowels, Jr., Thomas D. 
Jones, Walter Forslund, and Skid 
Johnson. 

Mrs. William F. Drea, 12 College 
Place, entertained at iher home, 
Friday afternoon, November 15, for 
the active and the honorary mem- 
bers of Zetalethian society. 

Phi Delta Theta entertained at a 
Night Club Party on Friday, No- 
vember 15th, at the chapter house. 
The guests were Marian MacMillan, 
Margaret Gragg, Mildred Hazlett, 
Hildegarde Norton, Marian Cole, Jo 
Campbell, Maxine Moore, Margaret 
Killian, Alice Pate, Elizabeth Skid- 
more, Margaret Timmons, Helen 
Elliot, Martha Herbert, Sally Oliver, 
Harriet Floyd, Katherine Poland, 
Ruth Frame, Priscilla Todd, Elean- 
or Watts, Virginia Miller, Hester 
Jane Butcher, Dorothy Horn, Fran- 
ces Coe, Rebecca Todd, Myra 
Reinking, Margaret Melis, Margaret 
McClelland, Eleanor McCleary, 
Frances Villano, Tom Rhodes, Jack 
Miller, Tom Scott, and Ormond 
Cox. 

Contemporary Dance 

Contemporary society entertained 
at a dance at the club house, Fri- 
day evening, November 15. The 
chaperons were Miss Eleanor S. 
Davis and Mr. and Mrs. Gordon 
Parker. The guests were Charles 
Wilgus, Hilary Moseley, Cecil Ben- 
der, Francis Burshears, John Chest- 
nolvich, Francis Robbins, Paul Ves- 
tal, Ralph Jones, Oscar Hammer, 
Arthur Baylis, Glenn Murray, Fred 
Hammer, and H. L. Standley. 

At a meeting of the Plaza Hash- 
ers' Union last evening Carl Nelson 
was appointed a committee of one 
to make arrangements for the or- 
chestra for their dance, which will 
be held Friday evening, December 

6. 

This dance is held each semester, 
and is quite an elaborate ball. It 
is purely invitational. 



All Colorado College women are 
invited to attend a tea at Bemis 
hall, this afternoon from four until 
six o'clock. The affair is the first 
of a series of teas which is being 
sponsored by the girls' societies, 
and are for society and non-society 
girls. Miss Sara Evarts will speak. 

Phi Gam Dance 

The Phi Gamma Delta fraternity 
gave an advertising dance at their 
chapter house last Saturday. The 
walls were lined with posters adver- 
tising merchandise, and many cou- 
ples came in costume representing 
national advertising slogans. The 
guests included Elinor 0. McCleary, 
Barbara Pearce, Katherine Sweet, 
Marian Vandenburg, Harriet Floyd, 
Margaret Killian, Louise Buckley, 
Alberta Jones, Jean Horan, Mary 
Margaret Meston, Catherine Hood, 
Martha Herbert, Doris Simmons, 
Marian Wienberger, Annabel Drum- 
mond, Lucille Hunter, Margaret 
Gragg, Melba Adams, Dorothy 
Faus, Wilmoth Harris, Genevieve 
Engel, Helen Hummel, Margaret 
Giddings, and Frank Seeley. The 
chaperons were Professor and Mrs. 
R. 0. Gilmore, Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
E. Evans, Jr., and Mr. and Mrs. 
Jack Dern. 

Tiger Squad Party 

Members of the Tiger football 
squad were entertained by Dr. E. 
R. Neeper at his cabin in Crystal 
Park, Sunday. After dinner, t h e 
Bengals entertained themselves by 
hiking and throwing snow balls. 
Among those present, other than 
the squad, were Dr. Woodward, 
Boxley Cole, Walt Hughes, Bob 
Lackey, Jim Weir, and Coach Van 
de Graaff. 

Sigma — the organization of 
mothers and sisters of Sigma Chi, 
met Thursday afternoon at the 
chapter house. Mrs. Fay Kennedy 
and Mrs. J. C. Tate were hostesses. 

A Thanksgiving party will be 
given by the Mothers, Sweethearts, 
and Sisters of the Pi Kappa Alpha 
fraternity, to the chapter on Tues- 
day evening. 

Among those who attended the 
Saturday night performance of the 
Koshare players were President 
and Mrs. C. C. Mierow, Professor 
and Mrs. Abbott, Jerry Cogan and 
Genevieve Engel, Humphrey Saun- 
ders and Dorothy Faus. Ruoert Mc- 
Clung and Annabelle Drummond. 
Barratt O'Hara, Pat Johnson, and 
others. 

The Mothers, Sisters, and Sweet- 
hearts Club of Kappa Sigma met 
Sunday afternoon at the chapter 
house. 



"You're Sure They're Pure" 

Pecan Butter 
Chips 35c lb. 

Crisp, wafer-like little 
oblong chips rich with 
the flavor of pecans 
and good fresh butter. 
The splendid feature for 
Saturday, the 23d. 

2e S. Tejon DCm'S 



"Better Equipped Than Ever 
To Handle College Trade." 



CAMPBELL'S 

BARBER SHOP 



109 East Pikes Peak Avenue 



Broken Lenses Duplicated 

Save the Pieces 

Eyes examined Lenses Ground 




THE LAUTERMAN-DUGAN 

JEWELRY AND OPTICAL CO. 

Jewelers, Optometrists and 

Mfg. Opticians 

Fine Watch, Clock and Jewelry 

Repairing 
1 2 1 N. Tejon St. Phone Main 674 



THE 

WHITE WAY 

SYSTEM 

Open Until 2 A. M. 

Try our delicious White 
Way Chili 

Snappy Curb Service 

1 1 N. Tejon St. 



This week's Candy Special 

35c lb. 



Bitter 

Sweets 



Barthel'S 

Tejon Street at 
Acacia Park Comer 



THE TIGER 




Here's Your 

VICTOR 
RECORD 



Headquarters Come in and hear 

for the latest releases in 

our ventilated trial 



RADIO 

Victor, Majestic 

Freed, Atwater 

Kent and 

Crosley 

113-115 N. Tcjon 



^qqAqs 

iEjFVRNITVRE ^: 



REX HOTEL 

Colorado Springs 




rOTHE 
CAME 



in a Saunders System car, and take 
a gang of rooters with you. Make 
'em kick in for a share of the ex- 
pense and all travel for less than 
railway fare. Ask about low long 
trip rates on Model A Fords and 
new Chryslers. 



D. C. Hutchings, Mgr. 

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 

Phone Main 1800 

21 No. Cascade Ave. 



SAUNDERS 



»rive It Yourself 1 



SYSTEM 



E. L. Bruce 

BARBER SHOP 



2 8 E. Kiowa 



DEPARTMENT CHAIRMEN 
DECORATE SHOP WINDOWS 



(Continued from page 5) 

Printing & Stationery Company, 
in which she is showing the ma- 
terial donated to the art depart- 
ment by the Carnegie Corporation 
for laboratory work in the art 
course. 

The Forestry School has an ex- 
hibit of unusual interest, arranged 
by Professor Gordon Parker, in the 
window of the Out West Tent & 
Awning Company. This exhibit 
consists primarily of forestry and 
logging tools and equipment, a 
number of different kinds of fire 
fighting tools, and a number of 
specimens of petrified woods from 
Florissant, Colorado, and from the 
Jamison ranch at Navajo, Arizona. 

Dr. P. E. Boucher has arranged 
an interesting display in the Peer- 
less Furniture Company window 
showing a map of the United States 
on which are marked the different 
points at which major students in 
the physics department, who have 
graduated from Colorado College in 
the past ten years, are located and 
the college or business organization 
with which they are associated. 

An exhibit of archaeological ma- 
terial from the college museum has 
been arranged in the corner window 
of the Perkins-Shearer Clothing 
Company by Mr. W. W. Postleth- 
waite, treasurer of the college and 
curator of the museum. The ex- 
hibit shows a model of the typical 
cliff dwellings in the San Juan area, 
and numerous pieces of pottery 
from that section. There are also 
shown primitive skiming knives and 
planting sticks; and also a number 
of sandals made from willow bark 
and yucca leaves, which were made 
by the prehistoric people in the 
southwest some 2,000 years ago. 

The geology department has a 
display in both the Pikes Peak Fuel 
Company and the Tucker-Dodson 
windows. Professor I. A. Keyte 
and Professor H. E. Mathias have 
very interesting exhibits of semi- 
precious stones, fossils, building 
stones, and other geological mater- 
ial. 

Mr. Jo E. Irish, graduate manager 
of athletics, has an attractive dis- 
play in the Thoniton-Sparey store 
window, showing trophies won by 
the football and other teams of the 
college during the past ten years. 

HULBERT SPEAKS 

Professor Hulbert delivered an 
address on Sunday afternoon at the 
Open Forum commenting upon the 
article, "The College and Main 
Street," written by Professor Wilm. 
The article appeared in a recent is- 
sue of the Nation, and was re- 
viewed in the Tiger. 



PiCGLY&WlCCLY 



\mmz 



^ 



ALL OVER THE WORLD 

FIVE BUSY STORES IN 

COLORADO SPRINGS 



Fashionable apparel for Women and Misses 
— Dance Frocks 
— Millinery 
— Hosiery 

105 So. Tejon Main 1346-W 




Vorhes— 



Thanksgiving Sale 

College men and women will find the foot- 
wear they want for street or dress wear 
on sale at Vorhes — til Dec. 1st. 
$ 7.50 and $8.50 values - - - $ 5.95 

$10.00 values - $ 7.50 

$13.50 values - $10.75 

(See them today) 



AJS>^$\ej 



^ 



S HOES aH'> HOSIERY 

22 S. TEJON ST. 



THE TIGER 



CURRENT ART EXHIBITIONS 
MUSIC 



THEATRE 



CINEMA REVIEWS- 
DRAMA 



-BOOKS 



Inquiring 

Reporter 



QUESTION: 

What do you think of "Rio Ri- 
ta" playing at the America theatre? 
ANSWERS: 

Genevieve Enge! — I think it is 
the best talkie that has come from 
the musical comedy stage. 

Marian MacMillan — The songs 
in "Rio Rita" were about the best 
ones that I have heard in the mo- 
vies for a long time. 

R. J. Woodward— I liked it be- 
cause there was good actuig, danc- 
ing, and singing. What I mean 
there sure was "it." 



ACT FOR THE MOVIES 

Alexander Film Com- 
pany wants exper- 
ienced and inexper- 
ienced motion picture 
actors and actresses. 
Personal interview 
only at 1 p. m., Mon- 
day, Wednesday and 
Friday at Alexander 
Industries Building. 



Follies Opening 
Will Be Monday 



The American Legion Follies, de- 
luxe 1929 edition, will be present- 
ed at the Burns theatre Monday, 
Tuesday, and Wednesday evenings, 
and matinee Wednesday. 

College women are taking an im- 
portant part in the extravaganza. 
Marian MacMillan, Margaret Brad- 
fie'.d, Miriam Lockhart, Marian 
Coles, Virginia Rayburn, Olive 
Harner, Gretchen Sherk, and Mar- 
garet Enyart appear at the Blue- 
bird number, doing many trick 
steps. 

College men, also, appear to ad- 
vantage. Claire Jencks, Elvin 
Griffith, Marvin Ingebretson, Ar- 
thur Baylis, Winnie Crouch, Dewitt 
Tucker, Dick Sanderson, and Paul 
Conover put on several collegiate 
numbers. 

Mary Hawks, who will be remem- 
bered for her singing in the Kappa 
Sigma serenade last spring, carries 
one of the leads. Her singing and 
dancing will feature the Follies. 

One hundred seventy-five per- 
sons take part in this massive show. 



Post 5, American Legion, Presents 

The Magnificent, Spectacular 
Tuneful Revue 

Follies 

"^ of '29 



BURNS 



Direction 

Mrs. Dan U. 

Hampton 



PARAMOUNT 



MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY 

and Wednesday Matinee 

Nov., 25,26, 27 

Seats on Sale Now at Box Office 

From now on till the last performance, seats may be secured at 
the Burns-Paramount Box Office — also tickets bought from 
Legionnaires may be exchanged there. 
NIGHTS— Parquet and Loges, $2; Dress Circle, $1.50; Balcony, 

$1 ; GaMery, 50c. 
MATINEE — Lower Floor and Loges, $1; Balcony SOc; Gal-' 

lery, 25c. 



CRITIC WELL PLEASED 
WITH KOSHARE PLAYERS 



"The Wild Duck" 

By Henrik Ibsen; presented by 
the Koshare players, in Cogswell 
theater, November 15 and 16; di- 
rected by Prof. Arthur G. Sharp, 
Jr. 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 
Hialmar Ekdal, a photographer — 

James Keyser 
Gina Ekdal, his wife — Mary Stra- 

chan 
Hedvig Ekdal, their daughter — 

Eleanor Tremayne 
Old Ekdal, Hialmar's father — Mor- 

ley Brandborg 
Gregers Werle, a fanatic — Loren 

Chaney 
Railing, a doctor — William Van 

Dyke 
Molvik, an ex-theologian — Gene 

Lague 
Old Werle, Greger's father — Fred 

Nichols 

Mrs. Sorby, Werle's housekeeper 

— Suzanne Walker 

Like Relling, who informs the 
audience that Hialmar must live in 

(Continued on page 10) 



Todd Elected Officer 

Of Euterpe Society 

The Euterpe Musical and Dra- 
matic Society met in Perkins Hall, 
on Tuesday evening, November 
19th with 25 members present. Re- 
becca Todd ihas been appointed to 
fill the vacancy of Second Vice- 
President, whose duty it is to act 
as chairman of the decoration com- 
mittee and make the individual 
program for each meeting. 

The program was as follows: 
Piano — 

Guinevere ----- Geibel 
Helen Thompson 
Reading — 

A Visit to the Photographer 
James Huskie 
Duologue — 

He and She 
Jane Kimzey and Ivan Schweninger 
Piano — 

Valse Caprice - - - Newland 
Jack Kmlz 
Reading — 

Peg Waffington - - Mackay 
Jane Kimzey 
Play— 

Burglar-Proof 
Ivan Schweningerfi Gale Middle- 

stclter, James Huskie 
Lecture ------- 

- - "Mechanism of the Piano" 
Dean Hale 



AMERICA 



Sunday and Monday 

"TANNED LEGS" 

All singing, talking, dancing 
Musical Comedy 



Coming Tuesday 

The 
ALLTAUaHG 

Picture Hit! 
The Trial of 

MARY 
DUGAN 



ISAAC BROTHERS 

WATCHMAKERS and JEWELERS 

32 East Bijou Street 



RIALTO- 

Starts 
SATURDAY 

"SO THIS 
COLLEGE" 

All 
Talking 
Sbging 

Football 
Romance 

It's the Greatest 

Campus Picture 

Ever Made 



irll 



10 



THE TIGER 




Concert At Perkins 

Drew Record Audience 



S ervices f o r y ouf 
car that includes 

Proper Lubrication 

100% Alemite 

LEADING MOTOR OILS 

Weaverized Washing 

Tire Repairing Road Service 

Drive in Today 

FIRESTONE TIRES 
117 N. Nevada Phone M. 202 



TkOMUk 



TENT £.' AWNING CO, 



Awnings and Camp Supplies 



PLAZA 

DINING 
ROOM 

"The Place to Eat" 

Breakfast Luncheon 

Dbner 



A concert was given by men 
and women of Colorado College at 
Perkins Hall, November 21 at 
: 1 5. The Girls' Glee Club is very 
strong this year and is putting on a 
very good program. Men are tak- 
ing a very important part in the 
concert, giving chorus and quartet 
numbers. 

The program follows: 

I Kaiser 

II Vermeland - Swedish Folk Songs 
Cuckoo 

III Serenade from the Student 

Prince - - - - Rembery 
Lettof — Marian Englebretsin 
Astulerg — Robert Spiegle 
Lucas — Dean Thembly 

IV The Call of having Dream Rob- 
ber (songs from Orient - Naiden 

V "0 Promise Me" from Robin 

Hood - - - - deKaven 

VI Mother Goose to date, Chinese 

and Otherwise 

VII "Gypsy Love Song" from For- 

tune Teller - - - Herbert 
"Auf Weidersehn" from Blue 
Paradise - - - - Romberg 



REX HOTEL 

Colorado Springs 



Frank Geddy Says— 

"ROLL OLE BOULDER ON 
THE SOD" 

The Shoe Shop 

Across from the High School 



Koshare Play Pleases 

Tig^er Drama Critic 



FROSH GRIDDERS MEET 
GRAND JUNCTION TEAM 

On Thanksgiving Day the Tiger 
Freshman team will again journey 
to the Western Slope where they 
play Grand Junction Junior College. 

Twenty-five men are reporting 
for practice every one of these cold 
afternoons. It is probable that 
Coaches Vandenberg and Rossener 
will take the entire squad on this 
last campaign. It is the big game 
of the year for the Grand Junction 
fans; the Tigers are out to win; so 
the game west of the Divide should 
be a thriller. 



CAmilAC 

and 

CHRYSLER 

MOTORCARS 

Adams Motor Co. 

Marksheffel Building 



(Continued fronn page 9) 

a delusion that he has potential 
claim to greatness, so I am now 
under the illusion that the Koshare 
players put on a performance last 
Saturday evening that predicts well 
for the dramatic interests during 
the commg season. I urge you all 
not to miss their next production. 

Each character was extremely 
well interpreted. Brandborg's orig- 
inal entry was perfect, although on 
a few occasions later he seemed to 
be a stalwart hunter trekking the 
marshes on his duck chase rather 
than the garret trapper. Keyser, 
playing the lead, and with the hard- 
est role, seemed to be in too much 
of a hurry to get off some of his 
speeches, almost making his lines 
a continuity with his cues. Elean- 
or Themayne was in her part per- 
fectly. I wanted so much to save 
her from the inevitable bHndness. 
Mary Strachan was a very good 
wife, until the denouement, and 
then she failed to convince me that 
her grief was real. From this point 
on she and Chaney seemed to be 
representing the wife and reform- 
er, respectively, rather than actual- 
ly being them. 

Suzanne Walker was the best of 
the minor characters. Her part was 
thoroughly done. Van Dyke and 
Lague, the two drunkards about 
town, were satisfactory. Perhaps 
Van Dyke in his meditations was 
more of a philosopher rather than 
a cynical doctor. Fred Nichols was 
a good selfish father. 



Alexander Moves Movie 
Studio; Wants Actors 

The studios of the Alexander 
Film Co. previously located in Hol- 
lywood are being transfered to 
Colorado Springs. This will fur- 
nish part time employment for 
many C. C. students. 

A drawing cast of 100 persons 
representing all types is now being 
selected from the student body. 
Some of the work is underway, as 
several scenes have already been 
shot. 

The annual payroll of the com- 
pany in Colorado Springs will be 
over $60,000. J. Don Alexander 
in a recent announcement said that 
a dollar an hour would be paid for 
part time work of inexperienced 
actors while the more talented ones 
would be given steady work with 
higher wages. 

Anyone desiring further infor- 
mation sihould see J. M. Fitzgerald, 
vice- president of the Alexander 
Industries, who is in charge of the 
Film department. Personal inter- 
views may be obtained at one 
o'clock on Mondays, Wednesdays, 
and Fridays at the Alexander In- 
dustries Building. 



Law Nearly Keeps Mich. 
Coeds From Taking Pins 

Heart throbs were fast and heavy 
beneath the fraternity pine on af- 
fianced co-eds at the University of 
Michigan last week. B'ut, whose 
sentimental young heart would not 
throb at the thought of state leg- 
islators enacting a law that would 
make it a petty offense for a girl to 
wear her boy friend's fraternity pin 
— even if it was for fun. 

But hurried calls to a sympathetic 
senator relieved the situation. It 
was true that a law had been 
passed to prohibit the wearing of 
fraternal pins with intent to de- 
fraud, but if the girl professes sin- 
cerity even the unsentimental solon 
couldn't see grounds for fraud. 



Hey-Service 

The 
HEYSE SHEET 
METAL WORKS 

INC. 

219 N.Weber 
Main 552 



W. I. Lucas 

HAS 
EVERYTHING IN 

SPORTING GOODS 
"Tigers always welcome" 

119 N. Tejon St. 
Main 900 



Photographs of our Colorado 
mountains. Nicely made — 
attractively colored by hand. 
Moderate in price — framed 
or unframed. 

H. L. STANDLEY 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs 



DUTCH 

for touchdowns and DUTCH 
(Hammond) for new driver- 
less cars. 

New Fords 7c per mile; 
30c per hour. 

New Cheve Six's 8c per mile ; 
35c per hour. 

Office 

ELK HOTEL 

Phones M. 346 and 2065 
Free Delivery 



THE TIGER 



11 



A SERVICE 
Evrey for Purse 



THE 
PEARL LAUNDRY 



BUICK AND MARQUETTE 
MOTOR CARS 

Strang's 



Harry D. MacDonald 
President 



IHE J. S. BROWN 

MERCANTILE 

COMPANY 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



Made in Colorado Springs 

VAN BRIGLE 
ART POTTERY 

The world's most famous 
art pottery. 

Visitors always welcome. 



Wear a Tiger "Woolie" and "Mum" 
to the Game. 




30 N. Tejon Phone M. 214 



Rhone Main 1710 

[DEAL 

i CLEANERS 

5 West Colorado Ave. 



Valctor Pressing Service 



Science Pictures Shown 
By Physics Department 

During the past two years the 
Department of Physics of Colorado 
College has shown a number of 
programs of motion pictures de- 
picting various phases of industry 
and the many applications of sci- 
entific research to industry. These 
pictures have demonstrated their 
value as a means of education and 
in popularizing various scientific 
principles which are commonly 
thought to be beyond the average 
mental capacity. 

The first of the series of pro- 
grams for this year was shown 
Wednesday, November 13, in Room 
32, Palmer Hall. The program 
consisted of "The Benefactor", a 
pictorial biography of Thomas A. 
Edison and "Hawaii, Today." The 
films showing the life and work of 
Edison were especially appropriate 
in view of the recent celebration of 
the Fiftieth Anniversary of the In- 
vention of The Electric Light. The 
series of pictures are open to the 
public without any charge. 



Patterson Extends Bid 
To Students For Dance 



Pat Patterson announces that 
students of C. C. and C. U. have 
been invited to attend the Cosmo- 
politan on Friday evening. The 
management has arranged a foot- 
bail dance with special features and 
entertainment. The Seven Aces are 
getting a larger following all the 
time and it is claimed among col- 
lege circles that they are by far the 
best in this region. Dancing will 
be from 9 till 1 on Friday and Sat- 
urday nights. 

Luncheon dances are also being 
featured by the management. 

Speakers Address Clubs 
Concerning Bigger C. C. 

Luncheon club speakers are mak- 
ing a direct appeal to the business 
men of the city, showing how a 
greater Colorado College will mean 
more business here. They point 
out how, with a student enrollment 
slightly more than 600 students and 
members of the faculty, as well as 
the college, spends approximately 
$1,000,000 yearly in the city. It is 
estimated that a student body of 
1 ,000, one of the main objectives 
of the expansion program of the 
college, will spend at least $1,500, 
000 in the city each year. 

STAFF MEETING 

The editorial staff of the Tiger 
held a meeting at Tichnor Study 
Tuesday evening. About thirty- 
five members of the staff were 
present. Permanent assignments 
were given to the reporters, and 
speciid work was assigned to others. 



Good Plumbing and Heating 

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PLUMBING 6f HEATING COMPANY 

226 N. Tejon St. V^AKER M. 48 



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"TODAY'S NEWS TODAY" 

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THE TIGER 




Time/ 






"^'^^'#/kJLu -^ 




...In a cigarette it's jASTE / 



Hit the nail on the head" ... cut out the 

frills, give smokers the one thing they want— 
and sales will take care of themselves. /J^ 

At least, that's the Chesterfield platform. The /A^^i 

one thing smokers want is good taste — and that's 
the one thing we're interested in giving them— 



TASTE above everything 





MILD ... and yet 
THEY SATISFY 



hesterfield 

FINE TURKISH and DOMESTIC tobaccos, not only BLENDED but CROSS-BLENDED 



@ 1929, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co . 



illlllMIIIIIIIMIMIM 








VOLUME XXXII 
Number 11 



Ohe Colorado College ^^ 

!ffI©E 

Official Students Publication 

November 27, 1929 







«_>o5 06l_» «_-^ oBl_» t_^a5 ^olj . 



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IIIIIJIIIIJIIJIIIIJIIJIIIIMIJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIJI 



^^1 Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, November 28 



\&3 



\ ^1 ^ 



KSI 



Following a decree made by Governor Bradford of the Plymouth 
Settlement, the first Thanksgiving Day wc-s celebrated in 1621 after 
the first crop had been gathered in the new land. 

(See page 5) 




Office of Pnblication: 23 Weat Colorado Ave., Colorado Springi, Colo. 



THE TIGER 



4 ».»..»..ti.«. i«. ■»..».■»■ ■ «it « «i HH ■ i» 



Have You Tried Those 

DeliciousToasted 
Sandwiches 



at 



TheMURRAY 

Drugf Co. 

21 S. Tejon 832 N. Tejon 



SUPERIOR 

Dry Cleaning Co. 

Telephone 1364 129 N. Tejon 



5 N. Tejon 



121/2 N. Nevada 



2 SHOPS 



Quality Lunch 



TRY OUR HAMBURGERS AND CHILI 
Orders over $1.00 delivered free. 



M. 1784 



M. 1463-J 



Quality Sporting 
Merchandise — 



A complete line of 
BASKET BALL SHOES 
SWEAT SOX 
SWEAT SHIRTS 

and all the other 
sport accessories. 






at Cossitt Hall 



e 
ore 



Special 

Prices on 
fraternity 
Basketball 
Equipment 



Tat" Hayden, Mgr. 



TOR YOUR CONVENIENCE" 

We Dry Clean 

"Phone us first" 




M. 2958 



Gents' 
Hats 
Topcoats 
Tuxedos 
Gloves 
Ties 

Sweaters 
Etc. 



Phcne Main 4671 



831 North Tejon 



A. L. STARK 

TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 

COLORADO SPRINGS 



Dine and Dance at the 

COLLEGE INN 

J. C. CULLEY, Prop. 




After the Football Season 

During Conference football season, days rush 
by; each succeeding Saturday brings a new game 
— after it's over, days do a slow motion until 
Christmas vacation. But, if you're from out of 
town, you needn't wait until Christmas to talk with 
Mother and Dad. "Visit" them by telephone. For 
lowest rates call by number. Try calling today; 
they'll be glad to hear your voice. 

Charges Can Be Reversed if You Like 

The Mountain States 
TELEPHONE & Telegraph Co. 



Issued Friday of each week. Entered at the Post Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter. 



VOLUME XXXII 



GKM^ TieFoR 



Colorado College Weekly News Magazine 



Number 11 



COLORADO JINX IS 
STILL OVER TIGERS 



Tough breaks for the Tigers — 
and maybe the 'Boulder Jinx' that 
has been on the job since 1916 — 
were the two main elements in a 
13-7 victory that the state eleven 
took from the Tigers last week. 
Reagan, diminutive field general, 
and McKeIvy — his lithe and elusive 
team mate, led the Silver and Gold 
onslaught, and paved the way for 
the two scores with their superb 
ball toting. 

Clark played brilliant ball in 
spots, and then at times seemed as 
if he would like to forget football 
forever. He had very little sup- 
port from any of his mates, and 
only occasionally did his line attain 
the stubborness that they had dis- 
played against Utah. He and In- 
graham found a passing combina- 
tion that worked with fated regu- 
larity in the last half — but it was 
insufficient to put the eleven over 
the needed seven points to win the 
game. 

Irwin played his usual stellar 
game running brilliant interference, 
and hitting the Silver and Gold 
men for hard tackles. He and 
Jones spelled Clark on the ball 
toting, the latter going thru the 
wall for substantial gains. 

The line stiffened in several 
pinches, especially in the last heat 
when they held state for four 
downs, and kept Bill Smith — 
smashnig C. U. captam— from gain- 
ing a foot, when a foot was needed 
for another touchdown. At other 
times however. Smith and McKel- 
vey went over center and guards 
for heavy gains. The latter knifed 
thru tackle for yards at a time, or 
reeled off other gains with his 
teammate Reagan, around the ends. 

(Continued on page 11) 

Five Students Will 

Received Tiger Keys 



Tiger keys are awarded to mem- 
bers of the staff of the Colorado 
College Tiger who have served two 
or more years on the staff of the 
Tiger, have received recommenda- 
tions from the editor or manager, 
and are seniors. The editor and 
manager receive the keys upon ap- 
pointment to office. 

Keys have been just received for 
those who earned the keys last year. 
Al Brown, George Jecks, Dalome 
Knox, Mary Clark and Loeme 
Hanes received their keys. 



ROLL IS 
REPORTED FOR 
MEN STUDENTS 



Dean Lovitt announced the grades 
of Freshman and Sophomore men 
who have an average over eighty- 
five per cent. The number of un- 
der cicssmen with an average over 
eighty per cent, was double that of 
the upper classmen. Anderson, 
and Charles Cogan, Sophomores 
have an average over ninety per 
cent, as does James Dodson of the 
freshman class. 

Freshmen 
85% or above 

Dodson, James .90.5 

Engstrom, George 86.1 

Gregory, William Edgar 85.2 

Gross, Siegfried, T 85.1 

Haney, John Donald .86.5 

Horton, Donald 85.3 

Houghton, Lyman 87.0 

Mackintosh, Albyn 89.8 

Mackintosh, Charles ..86.2 

Mogilner, Abe 89.3 

Murray, Joseph Hartley 85.2 

Nichols, Frederick 85.2 

Renken, Kenneth 89.8 

SchuUz, Harold 86.2 

Shock, Darcy 87.0 

Smith, John 89.8 

Swenson, Wilfred 85.8 

(Continued on page 4) 



TIGERS PLAY LAST GAME OF 
SEASON AT PUEBLO THURSDAY 



SCIENCE ACADEMY TO 
MEET THIS WEEK-END 



Bramhall on Model League Committee 



The Student council of Denver 
University is to be host to represen- 
tatives of the various Rocky Moun- 
tain Colleges in a Model League of 
Nations, to be held in the Senate 
Chamber of the State Capitol, prob- 
ably sometime early in March. Dr. 
Edith C. Bramhal, Professor of Pol- 
itical Science at Colorado College 
was named on the temporary com- 
mittee to take charge of advance 
plans, at a dinner held in Denver 
Saturday night for the purpose of 
organizing to carry out the am- 
bitious scheme. 

It is planned that students from 
the different schools will take tlic 
part of variou; nations actually re- 
presented in the League at Geneva. 
It is expected that 120 students will 
lake part in the proceedings. The 
Hcor of the Senate will be cleared 
of all excepting students, but the 
galkr'cs will be open to the public 



\1 i^rominent speake 



rs will also 



attend and assist in the proceedings. 
Among them will be Norman Thom- 
as, Socialist Candidate for the Pres- 



The final gun of the Tiger-Mines game in Pueblo Thanksgiving day 
will ring down the curtain of the 1929 Rocky Mountain football season, 
as well as witnessing the passing of two of the greatest football players 
this conference has ever seen, namely. Earl "Dutch" Clark, of Colorado 
College, and Floyd Carr, of the Colorado Schoool of Mines. 

Still smarting under the defeat handed them by Colorado Univer- 
sity gridsters last Saturday by the score of 13-7, the Bengals are ready to 
fight it out and make a spectacular 
finish to close the season. The 
School of Mines rested last Satur- 
day and will be in a fine fettle for 
tse contest. 

The game is being played in Pu- 
eblo at the request of the Pueblo 
business men in order that Dutch's 
home-town folks may see their idol 
in action once again before he 
packs up his moleskins and sets 
forth into the business world. Dutch 
has been hailed, and it is rightly 
stated, as the greatest football 
player the state of Colorado and the 
Rocky Mountain conference has 
ever seen. Last year he was unan- 
imously voted quarterback of t h e 
Associated Press All - American 
team, and he is the only man from 
this conference to ever be awarded 
that honor. Thursday's game will 
mark his last appearance in a 
Black and Gold football uniform, 
although he has accepted the invi- 
tation to play in the annual East- 
West classic on the coast New 
Year's Day. 

Coach Bully Van de Graaff w\\\ 
be ready to "shoot the works" 
against the Orediggers Thanksgiv- 
ing day. Chances are that he will 
start his "pony" backfield including 
the Flying Dutchman, Charley Ir- 

( Continued on pa,'e 1) 



Members of the Colorado Col- 
lege faculty are to take an active 
part in the program of the Colo- 
rado-Wyoming Academy of Sci- 
ence, which will meet with the 
Colorado Social Science Associa- 
tion here at Colorado on the 29th 
and 30th of November. Proffessor 
Paul E. Boucher, head of the Phys- 
ics department, is a member of the 
executive committee and is in 
charge of the local arrangements 
for the meeting. Prof. Boucher 
will also submit a paper. The Use 
of Still Film Photography in Lab- 
oratory and Research Work, before 

(Continued on page 10) 



idency in the last election. Schools 
which will take part in the assembly 
will be: Co'orado College, The Uni- 
versity of Colorado, Colorado Ag- 
gies, Mines, Teachers, and the Uni- 
versily of Denver. Active Prepara- 
tions will start on Wednesday night 
when representatives from the Uni- 
versity of Colorado will meet with 
students from Colorado College to 
discuss plans. Stewart Wilson is 
in charge of plans for C. C, and 
all students particularly interested 
rre invited to be present at the 
meeting in Ticknor Study on Wed- 
nesday evening. 

Several such Model Leagues have 
been successfully staged in eastern 
schools, at Harvard, Yale and Cor- 
nell, but this is the first time that 
such a meeting has been attempted 
this far west. The Students Coun- 
cils of the various schools are very 
anxious to make the meeting one 
which will compare favorably with 
those already held, and are begin- 
ning preparations early with that 
end in view. 



Banquet Open Drive 
For Pueblo Endowment 



A banquet was held in Pueblo 
November 21, preliminary to the 
Endowment Campaign which will be 
conducted there this week. Fifty 
graduates and former students were 
present. The meeting was presid- 
ed over by Robert McElvain. The 
speakers included Dr. Mierow, Dean 
Feautux, and Dt. Lloyd Shaw. 

Great enthusiasm was shown at 
this meeting and Pueblo Alumni 
pledged service on behalf of a 
greater Colorado College. It is 
their hope lo make a credible show- 
ing demonstrating their loyalty to 
the Alma Mater by subscribing one 
hundred per cent. 



THE TIGER 



EAT 'EM UP TIGERS 

Then come down and eat 
that tasty 
Confection 

AL'S FRENCH 
FRIED POPCORN 

114 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 



FRANK SARLAS & CO, 

Shoe Shining and Repairing 

Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Quick Service 

132 E. Pikes Peak 



The Trip that Bankrupts the 
English Language 

CORLEY 

Mt. Highway 

Cripple Creek in high gear 



LOOK YOUR BEST 

Have your hair cut in the 
approved manner. 

Pete's Barber Shop 

8 E. Cucharras St. 



You will Look and Feel Better 
after seeing us. 

Elk Barber Shop 

122 East Pikes Peak 



WHY NOT 

Learn Typewriting 
while attending Col- 
lege? Your teachers 
will appreciate type- 
written work to be 
checked. We can ar- 
range hours to suit 
your convenience. 






High Grades Made 
by Underclassmen 

(Continuecl from page 3) 

Turner, James Howard 89.2 

Sophomores 
85% or above 

Anderson, Roland 82.5 

Bell, Wm 87.6 

Burke, Carl 85.75 

Cogan, Charles 90.8 

DeFlon, Eric 88.3 

Goff, Howard 88.4 

Haussermann, John Wm 87.2 

Hess, Archie D. ..86.9 

Hilligoss, Raymond 86.9 



PAUDRE-PAUFFE 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Permanent Finger and Water 

Waving 

Manicure and Scalp Treatments. 

Marcels 50c. 



They're Pure 



Vanilla Cream 
Butterscotch 
at 35c lb. 



One of the favorites — 
a delightful combination 
of flavors. Feature for 
Saturday, the 30th. 



Dern's 




Go To 

Miller Music Co. 

"Where Musx Is Sweetest" 
13 North Tejon Street 

for Records and Music 

GEORGE L. MILLER. Prop. 



Couture's 

French Cleaning and Dyeing Co. 

Phones 1288-1289 
218 N. Teion St. Colorado Springs 



4^ 



I Frank Geddy Says— 

I Show the Miners how to 
j dig — hit 'em hard Tigers — 

and bring home the Turkey 

Thanksgiving. 

The Shoe Shop 

Across from the High School 
4. 4. 



TIGERS nGHT MINERS 
ON PUEBLO GRIDIRON 



(Continued from page 3) 

win, Eddie Hartman, and either 
"Ake" Akin, or "Lighthouse" 
Pomeroy. But if this bunch should 
fail to function propertly, he will 
have good men such as Jones, Hink- 
ley, and Ingraham ready to substi- 
tute. 

In the line. Bully will probably 
start the same combination that 
started the Boulder game, namely 
Heter and Reid at ends, the Star- 
buck brothers at tackles, McGrory 
and Hayden at guards and Weaver 
at center. But again there are 
plenty of good men to substitute 
like Sc'uthard, Matheson, Parker, 
Cogan and Rea. 

In summing up the Tiger foot- 
ball season, which has been a medi- 
ocre one, I venture to say that al- 
though the Tiger line has received 
much criticism, they may have been 
outweighed and outplayed, but they 
certainly haven't been outscrapped. 
The interference hasn't been as ef- 
fective as possible and the opposi- 
tion has thrown the Tiger backs for 
large losses, but the Bengals have 
fought it out to a finish with every 
opponent, and anybody that has 
played those scrapping Tigers 
knows that they have been through 
something when they finish. 

In the backfield the outstanding 
players for the Tigers have been 
Earl Clark, Chuck Irwin, Lyle 
Jones. Clark always comes through 
with a stellar performance. Irwin, 
who took Hinkley's place at mid- 
season, has proved his metal and 
has shown himself to be one of the 
best defensive backs in the confer- 
ence. Jones has backed up the hne 
in great style and has proved him- 
self a tackier of no mean ability. 

In the line, McGrory, the Cali- 
fornia giant, has looked liked All- 
Conference material in every game. 
He came through in a blaze of glo- 
ry at Boulder Saturday. And not 
very far behind him is "Hap" Star- 
buck, who is in almost every play 
and fights like a demon. Other 
linesmen have scrapped hard too, 
but haven't shown as much talent 
as the tow aforementioned. 

Thursday's game is to be played 
at the Pueblo Centennial field and 
is being sponsored by the Minne- 
qua University club. The game is 
expected to draw a record crowd 
from all over the state people who 
want to see the "Dutchman" in ac- 
tion for the last time in a Tiger uni- 
form. "Beat Mines!" 



STOCK BROS. 

Food Store 

119 East Colo. Ave. 

Fancy Dry Picked Turkeys, 
Pascal Celery, Plum Pudding 
and etc. for your 

THANKSGIVING DINNER 

Main 4303 and 4304 



H 



OWARD'S 

BARBER 
SHOP 



19 East Bijou Street 



The Colorado Planing 
Mill Co. 

MILL WORK OF ALL 
DESCRIPTIONS 

PADDLES 
Frank Mitchell, Manager 

Phone 2876-W 
525 W. Colorado Ave. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



CITY COAL 

15 East Pikes Peak Avenue 

Phone 

Main 67 or 120 



October 12, 1915 — A 47 to 
defeat at the hands of Colorado 
College was Montana's first exper- 
ience in the Rocky Mountain Con- 
ference game held Friday. 



[The Ice Cream 
that's a C. C. 
"Institution" 

The between Class "Cones", 
1 1 h e sandwich materials and 
(candy, the ice creams and ices 
I for class and club functions. 

From Frosh to Grad it's t h e 
1 place every Tiger knows. 

MoWRY'S 

Across from Campus 

Main 1183. 1184 



THE TIGER 



Nugget Staff Jobs 
Are Open To Applicants 



Membership on the staff of the 
Pikes Peak Nugget, the Colorado 
College yearbook, is still open to 
any students who wish to take part 
in this type of work. Any fresh- 
man who aspires to the position of 
editor of the Nugget must serve on 
the staff through his Freshman and 
Sophomore years. The women on 
the staff will be awarded one so- 
cial credit. 

The 1931 Nugget will be one of 
the most elaborate ever attempted 
at Colorado College. The art feat- 
ures have never been used before 
in a college yearbook. This year's 
annual will have no group pictures. 
This plan has been used very ex- 
tensively and it has been found to 
be very superior to the group plan. 



Miss Rose Helen Torbitt visited 
her sister, Mrs. C. R. Darnell, in 
Denver, November 23 and 24. 



Official Notices 



NOTICE SENIORS 

All Seniors should be sure to 
make arrangement for their caps 
and gown immediately as Insignia 
Day is December 12. Caps and 
gowns may be purchased at Barnes 
Woods. 



MINES GAME TICKETS 

Students should remember that 
the ticket in their student pass book 
will not admit them to the Mines- 
Tiger football game tomorrow. 
These tickets must be exchanged at 
the treasurer's office not later than 
today for regular admittance tic- 
kets. An additional fee of fifty 
cents will be charged for the ex- 
change. 



Rebecca Todd, Lorayne Dean, 
Priscilla Todd, Eleanor Schaff, and 
Harriet Floyd spent the week-end, 
November 23 and 24, at Boulder. 



Colored Jazz Orchestra Signs 
For Plaza Hashers Annual Dance 



Plaza Hashers are all set for 
their second semi-annual promen- 
ade, according to Glenn Wade, 
their union chairman. The event 
will be held on Friday evenin, the 
sixth of December. It will be held 
in the Peacock dining room of the 
Plaza Hotel. 

Carl Nelson and Sam Vickerman, 
in charge of the music, have signed 
up Colbert & Saunders Seven Piece 



Orchestra for the occasion. This is 
a real hot colored jazz band, and 
will attempt to outdo the dancers. 
This ball, which is given in hon- 
or of the Plaza hashers is exclu- 
sively invitational. The hashers 
are a group of college men who 
are working their way through 
school. Clark Butterfield is in 
charge of the affair. 




Front row (left to right) — Sam Vickerman, James Craig, Glenn 
Wade, Mrs. Ella Clark, David Scott, Bill Fales. and Owen B. Owens. 

Back row— Will Walters, Paul Vestal. Barratt O'Hara. and Clark 
Butterfield. 



THANKSGIVING DAY ORIGINATED 
IN 1863 BY ABRAHAM LINCOLN 



Thinking persons pause at this season of the year to find cause for 
thanksgiving and in this day and age they do not have far to go. 

Comparison of the plight of the Pilgrims with the conditions of 
present day Americans involves the portrayal of two extremes. The 
Pilgrims from the time they arrived on Cape Cod in the winter of 1620 
until the following summer underwent the most gruelling hardships. 
Their little band was swept by the Grim Reaper, comforts were few and 
far between and those who were 
alive were mostly ill. In fact, ac- 
cording to Governor Bradford's 
history of the Plymouth settlement, 
there were times when out of the 
entire colonv there were only six o. 
seven sound persons. 

The first winter in this country 
of this brave band of pioneers was 
one of extreme hardship and it was 
with feelings of relief that they saw 
the days lengthen and the Spring 
come. The gathering of the first 
crop gave rise to a spirit of cele- 
bration and Governor Bradford in 
1621 decreed a day of Thanksgiv- 
ing. This day was set aside to 
thank God for the blessings of the 
year and was a long remembered 
event. 

From Plymouth the Thanksgiv- 
ing custom spread to other colon- 
ies, until, in time the Governor of 
each issued a special thanksgiving 
proclamation annually. During the 
Revolutionary war Thanksgiving 
Days were observed after signal 
victories or wonderful deliverances 
from danger. For many years, 
however, there was no uniform 
Thanksgiving Day. 

Agitation to this end was carried 
on by Mrs. Sarah Josepha Hale, 
editor of Godey's Lady Book, whose 
efforts were rewarded in 1 863 when 
President Lincoln appointed the 
last Thursday of November as 
Thanksgiving Day. Mrs. Hale went 
down in history as the "Mother of 
Thanksgiving." — Dots and Dasthes. 



DUTCH WILL PLAY IN 
NEW YEARS DAY GAME 



Captain "Dutch" Clark, Asso- 
ciated Press All-American Quarter- 
back of 1928, has accepted an in- 
vitation to play in the annual East- 
West football game which will be 
held in San Francisco New Years 
Day. Last year, Clark was invited 
to play in this annual tilt, but did 
not accept the invitation on account 
of the near approach of basketball 
season. 

The Western team will be picked 
from stars of the Pacific, Rocky 
Mountain, and Missouri Valley con- 
ference, and it is probable that 
Pomeroy of Utah will play. 

With an All American line before 
him, and capable interference in 
front of him, Clark will have a great 
opportunity to show his All Ameri- 
can ability which he has not had a 
chance to display this year. 



Colorado College Has 
Good Weather Bureau 



Koerner Ranks Fourth 
Among State Players 



Frank Koerner, captain of t h e 
Tiger tennis team, has been ranked 
fourth among the tennis players of 
the state of Colorado. Koerner is 
the only college player to be ranked 
above the first eight in the state. 
He was a semi-finalist in the Den- 
ver tournament and he now holds 
the championship of Colorado 
Springs. 

Al Young, a Tiger star of sev- 
eral years ago tops the ranking list. 
Herman Clow, another former C. 
C. man, plays doubles with Young, 
and they are ranked at the top in 
this division. 



The Colorado College Observa- 
tory is a co-operative United States 
Weather Bureau. Harry Figge and 
Archie Hess have charge of the sta- 
tion, and work under the supervis- 
ion of the college authorities. This 
station has a complete outfit of in- 
struments for accurately determin- 
ing and recording weather condi- 
tions. The quadruple Recorder is 
a combination sunshine, rain, wind 
direction, and wind velocity record- 
er, and receives its records electric- 
ally from a sunshine transmitter, a 
tipping bucket rain gauge, a weath- 
er vane, and an annimometer. 
1 emperatures are recorded by a 
thermograph, maximum, minimum, 
wet, and dry thermometers, and 
and dew point, and relative humid- 
ity are also dclermmed from these. 
Precipitation is measured by rain 
gauges, and barometric pressure is 
recorded by a barograph, and an 
aneroid and micuric barometer. 
This stations furnishes the Gazette 
and Telegraph with the reports 
which are printed daily. 



THE TIGER 



Member of Rocky Mountain 

Inter-CoUe^ate Press 

Association 




The Colorado College 

Newspaper, 

Published Weekly by the 

Students. 



THE TIGER 

Articles intended for publication should be left in the Tiger Box, on the first 
floor of Coburn library, by Wednesday noon. No unsigned contributions will be 
published. 



LLOYD H. ELLIS Main 1975 _. _ Editor 

James Keyser Associate Editor Barratt O'Hara Desk Editor 



JAMES PATTERSON Main 2575... Manager 

Frank Dentan, Jr Advertising Manager 

Advertising — Harry Wood, Nelson Brown, Max Schmidt, Byron Whaley, Doc Gulick 
and Homer Bruce 

Merritt Ritter Circulation Manager 

Assistants — Glen Wade, Jack Fisher, Charlotte Pipkin, Elsie Winship, Marguerite 
Smith, Ruth Griffin and Margaretta Barr 



OUR LAST CHANCE. 

A University of Colorado student was over heard at the game last 
Saturday saying, "That Colorado College pep isn't what it used to be." 
That statement was made at the first part of the game when the Tigers 
were losing, and the cheering section was down hearted. With the ris- 
ing hopes of the team in the second period, the cheering section yelled 
louder and better. 

The game tomorrow will be the last chance for the Tiger support- 
ters to get out, and show appreciation for what the team has done this 
year. With a Tiger victory in the air, the variable pep ought to be in 
good form. For the last time in the season, the cheering section ought 
to get out and give the team the greatest support when it needs encoura- 
agement the most. Then, the Pueblo Colorado College fans will be- 
live that the '29 football spirit hasn't slipped a bit. 



LOG ROLLING? 

Was the voting for the constitution last week constitutional? Ac- 
cording to article VI of the old constitution, "a proposed amendment 
shall be read and its significance discussed by the Chairman of the Ad- 
ministrative Council at the next weekly meeting of the Associated Stu- 
dents and opened to discussion. Such proposed amendments shall be 
printed in the Colorado College Tiger for two consecutive issues. Then, 
'A vote shall be taken by the Associated Students at the next weekly 
meeting following the publication . . .' " 

If we must ihave a constitution, and follow the necessary rules, 
something should be done about our present slip-shod methods. At the 
election of the cheer leaders this fall, the selection was clearly uncon- 
stitutional. Nor had the amendments of the proposed constitution ever 
been read nor discussed in assembly a week before the election. Not 
the next week, but three weeks after the printing of the costitution in 
the Tiger was a vote taken. No publicity was given in regard to voting 
for the constitution at the meeting Thursday. Many students thinking 
there was nothing of importance did not attend the non-compulsory 
meeting. The action of producing the constitution last week shows 
symptoms of much log rolling. 



CHEATING. 

"Students in many colleges of the United States are attempting to 
play a dangerous game with their professors. They are trying to fool 
the professors by cheating, and some of the professors are taking it as 
a game of chance and are considering the practice well and good if the 
student does not get caught. Other professors, like myself, have a dif- 
ferent idea concerning this practice. If this cheating is a game, then 
the dice are loaded in my favor. I feel that I am here to instruct and 
be an aid to the students. If I ever see a student cheating, the loaded 
dice from then on will fall in my favor . Never again will the student 
have that shade of difference which may bring a ihigh 'E' to a 'D'." 

That IS the way a college professor of Colorado College summed up 
the problem of cheating some time ago. Whether there is or is not 
more cheating in Colorado College than in other schools will always be 
a question for controversy. Even if there be but little, that little is too 
much. Seeking, grades for the grade's sake is a high school practice. 
If a student cannot study, learn his own lesson, and take a test without 
stealing from his neighbor, he has no place in college. What a person 
does in college, he will continue to do when he leaves college, and al- 
though some will say that a too clever man will go far in the business 
world, and others will laugh at luncheon club honesty ,a person must 
be known to be honest by his superiors before they will have confidence 
in him. 



LOVE'S BALLAD ON A WISH 

By Jean Guillaume 
If I could have my greatest wish, 
A wish that would last but hours, 
I'd wish so hard for a garden space 
Bestrewn with a maze of flowers. 

And there I'd sit with a silver lute 
A-tuned to the nocturne's air; 
I'd play and I'd play to the moon above. 
While gende winds blew fair. 

But, hark! I'd hear a slumber sound 
That comes from a spot nearby. 
I'd stop my song, and hold my breath 
To stifle back a cry. 

For now the moon would drop to earth 
And change to a human form - - - 
To a girl with a face so radiant. 
That t'would still the greatest storm. 

"Selene! Selene!" I'd cry. 

Then quiet myself, amazed; 

While she, with graceful steps, would glide 

To the spot where I had gazed. 

I'd follow her to the sleeper's couch 
That made itself of leaves. 
And there I'd see a naked youth 
With the face of one who grieves. 

"Endymion ! Endymion ! 
Ah, love, could you but know 
My love for you is as a fount 
That shall never cease to flow. 

"But you, my life, must sleep tonight 
And every night that creeps. 
And never hear my heart's own voice 
That cries to thee who sleeps. 

"For he is mortal, while I am goddess; 
And our love can never be. 
So that is why I make to sleep 
This mortal whom I see; 



That 1 may come and kiss his brow 
Each night on my journey west; 
While he, this man of mortal birth. 
Will think me but a jest." 

Then this goddess of the moon would weep 
And shed love's bitter tear. 
Then slowly up the skyward climb 
She'd start, as one would fear. 

But in my wish Endymion 
Would waken with a start 
Would waken with a start 
And catch a glimpse of Selene fair, 

Now none could see a si^n of grief 
Upon Endymion's face. 
Because he woed his goddes fair — 
And she returned with grace. 

And as he woed, I'd pluck my lute 
And sing a song of joy — 
To watch, with glee, this lovely sight. 
And the joy of the shepherd boy. 

So if I had my greatest wish, 
A wish that would last but an hour, 
I'd play my lute in a garden space, 
And watch for the lover's bower . 



THE TIGER 



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AND WOMEN'S SHOES 

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Lobby Golden Cycle Bldg. 
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HOLLY SUGAR 

is 
the Best 

Sugar the essential food. 

HOLLY SUGAR 
CORPORATION 



Under New Management 

The College 
Barber Shop 

Ralph Schildknecht, Proprietor 

103 E. Cache la Poudre 
Colorado Springs 



Quality 



Cleaners and Dyers 

SUITS, O'COATS 

HATS $1.25 

U-Fone 1-8-1-1 We'll Call 

H. A. Thompson 
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SOCIETY 



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can purchase any make type- 
writer on monthly payments 
as small as $5.00 it is not a 
question of affording it 

The essential question is if 
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The first of a series of teas which 
are being sponsored by the inter- 
society council was held at Bemis 
Hall, last Friday. Miss Sarah 
Evarts spoke on the significance of 
the finer things in life and their 
place in the life of the college girl. 
The members of Mnierva society 
were hostess at the affairs, and the 
guests included a number of college 
girls. The next ofthe series will be 
held at Bemis Hall, Friday, Dec- 
ember 13. Hypatia society will be 
in charge, and Mrs. William F. Nel- 
son will speak on "Smith college." 
The members of the inter-society 
council desire to emphasize the fact 
that the teas are being held for all 
the girls at Colorado college, re- 
gardless of the fact that they may 
or may not be members of societies. 
The purpose of the affairs is to af- 
ford an opportunity for the girls 
of the college to become better ac- 
quanted and at the same time to 
provide interesting discussions on 
subjects of cultural value. 

Miss Evarts is associated with Dr. 
Murphy at the Child Guidence 
Clinic. Last year. Miss Evarts was 
an instructor at the college in social 
pathology. Students, who heard 
the speach, received a great deal of 
value from it. It dealt directly with 
her experiences in this rather new 
field of social work. 

Delta Alpha Phi fraternity en- 
tertained at a dance at the Chapel 
inn, last Friday evening. The chap- 
erones were Detm and Mrs. C. B. 
Hershey and Mr. and Mrs. F. M. 
Okey. The guests were: — Irene 
Slane, Sarah McMamira, Virginia 
Marbut, Sophia Crowe, Marian Ed- 
mondson, Mary Hawks, Alice Evans 
Dorothy Underwood, Mildred Arm- 
strong, Virginia Freudenberger, 
Maxine Moore, Margaret Bisson- 
nette, Eleanor Barnhart, Virginia 
Raywood, Grace Perkins. Nadine 
Drown, Estelle Montgomery, Herm- 
ina Kahn, Audrey Manion, Harriet 
Kingsley, Josephine Dickison, Al- 
fredda Wootton, Rita Conklin, Mar- 
garet Knowles, Charles Page, and 
George Kase. 



Alberta Williams, '29, is a mem- 
ber of the girl's glee club at the 
University of Illinois where she is 
taking graduate work this year. 

Miss Edith C. Bramhall spent last 
week-end in Denver. 

A dance sponsored by the stud- 
ent body presidents in the Rocky 
Mountain Conference, will be held 
at the Coronado Club, in Denver 
on Friday evening. Stewart Wilson, 



president of the student body, urges 
all Colorado college students who 
will be in Denver to attend the af- 
fair. Admission will be one dollor 
per couple. 

Beta Omega of Kappa Sigma will | 
entertain at its annual Thanksgiving 
breakfast dance at the Broadmoor 
hotel tomorrow morning at seven 
fifteen o'clock. Music will be furn- 
ished by Bob Shonsby's band. In 
addition to active members and 
alumni of the Colorado College 
chapter, a large number of Kappa 
Sigmas from other schools are ex- 
pected to attend the affair. 

Evelyn Hummel spent the week- 
end in Boulder at the Kappa Kap- 
pa Gamma house. 

Mildred Strachan, Katherine Her- 
bert, and Burton Paddock visited in 
Boulder, Saturday and Sunday. 

Thelma Dorroh spent the week- 
end in Boulder as the guest of Hel- 
en Brock at the Alpha Chi Omega 
house. Miss Brock attended Colo- 
rado College last year. 

Barratt O'Hara, II left Tuesday 
afternoon for Chicago to attend the 
funeral of his grandfather. 
— •»> f 

Colorado College student who at- 
tended the dance at the Broadmoor 
hotel, Saturday evening, included 
Virginia Dewey, Eva Crowder, Mary 
Strachan, Mildred Hazlett, Jane 
Lowell, James Keyser, Halbert Cur- 
zon. Jack Jacobs, Bill Neumaker, 
Al Brown, Henry Roebke, Ivan 
Ridge, William Leslie, T. Ernest 
Nowels, Jr., and Max Keyte. 

Dr. and Mrs. Lloyd Shaw, Dean 
Louise Fauteaux, Mr. B. Bursell, 
Mr. and Mrs. Mierow drove to 
Pueblo Thursday to attend a meet- 
ing of the Pueblo Alumni. About 
forty-two were present at the meet- 
ing, and a committee was appointed 
for the intensive endowment cam- 
pagin which began in Pueblo the 
week of November 25. 

Colorado college students who 
are taking part in the American 
Legion Follies are being presented 
at the Burns theatre this week in- 
clude Elizabeth Crannell, Jane 
Lowell, Marian McMillan, Margaret 
Bradfield, Miriam Lockhart, Marian 
Coles, Virginia Rayburn. Olive Har- 
ner, Gretchen Sherk, Margaret En- 
yart, Harold Harmon, Duane Os- 
borne, Clare Jencks, Elvin Griffith. 
Marvin Engbretson, Arthur Baylis. 
DeWitt Tucker, Winlhrop Crouch. 
Dick Sanderson, and Paul Conover. 



ISAAC BROTHERS 

WATCHMAKERS and JEWELERS 

32 East Bijou Street 



THE 

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Open Until 2 A. M. 

Try our delicious White 
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Broken Lenses Duplicated 

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Eyes examined Lenses Ground 




THE LAUTERMAN-DUGAN 

JEWELRY AND OPTICAL CO. 

Jewelers, Optometrists and 

Mfg. Opticians 

Fme Watch, Clock and Jewelry 

Repairing 
121 N. Tejon St. Rhone Main 674 



HART 

SCHAFFNER 

&MARX 

Clothes 

Leaders in 
Style 

Leaders in 
Values 



Stetson Hats 
Holeproof Hosiery 

WAYMIRE 
CLOTHING CO. 

24 So. Tejon 



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Headquarters 



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BUSY CORNER 
SHOE SHOP 

Shines — Shoe Repairs 
And Hats Blocked 

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T. J. Collier T. M. Collier 

V. L. Collier 

TheCOLLIER 

LUMBER CO. 

Phone Main 386 
543 W. Colorado Ave. 



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Shop 

Bijou and Nevada 

Try oar Malts and Toasted 

Sandwiches 



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MERCANTILE 

COMPANY 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



E. L. Bruce 

BARBER SHOP 

28 E. Kiowa 



MANY UPPERCLASSMEN 
HIGH IN SCHOLARSHIP 



Believing that scholarship should 
be commended as much as work in 
other college activities, and that 
encouragement helps a student 
more than nagging, the Dean of 
Men and the Dean of Women pub- 
lish a list of the students who have 
an average grade of over eighty per 
cent. 

At the present time, only t h e 
averages of the Senior and Junior 
men have been computed. It will 
be noted that there are nineteen 
seniors and fifteen juniors, and 
that Jerry Cogan, Joseph Ferguson, 
and George Merideth, all seniors, 
have an average over ninety per 
cent. 

Senior Men 
80% or above 

Burnham, Geo. H 88.97 

Caldwell, Robt. A 88.6 

Clark, Earl H 85.7 

Cogan, Jerry Albert 93.3 

Cogan, John P. .__ _. 85.8 

Ferguson, Joseph W -.90.8 

Forest, David B 80.7 

Harmon, Harold C 88.5 

Lewellen, Warren R 83.7 

Merideth, Geo. L 90.3 

Perkinson, Mark B 84.5 

Robinson, Geo. L 80.1 

Seeley, Frank 85.2 

Southard, Wm. P 83.2 

Vestal, Paul A 87 

Wade, Glenn F 81.2 

Wilson, Stewart G 80.9 

Wynn, Clayton S 83.9 

Young, Marion 89.2 

Junior Men 

80% or above 

Dentan, Frank G 83.5 

Ellis, Lloyd Harris 82.8 

Estill, Thomas 83.9 

Figge, Harry J 82 

Griffith, Maurice 83 

Irwin, Wm. Chas 80 

Keyser, James F 86.5 

Peck, Ed S 88.5 

Ragle, Richard Chas 83.1 

Rockett, Alious 84.5 

Roebke, Henry G 85.4 

Saunders, Humphrey 86.2 

Stroud. Kelly D 89.2 

Thurston, John Foster 83.2 

Tucker, Robt. DeWitt 89.8 



Traditional Turkey 

Chapel Is Held Today 



In accordance with an old cus- 
tom of the College, there will be a 
special Colorado College Thanks- 
giving service held at the regular 
chapel hour 10:03 a. m. on .Wed- 
nesday, Nov. 27. President Mie- 
row will speak. Members of the 
Faculty and student body are cor- 
dially invited to be present. 



RUTH SILLIMAM <J^ CAROL TRUAX 

Their Book Shop 

5 PIKES PEAK AVENUE. COLORADO SPRINGS COLQ 

A wide selection of Books and Gifts for 
Christmas Consideration. Christmas Cards, 

Wrapping Papers, and Tape. 



PiCGLY&WlCGLY 



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ALL OVER THE WORLD 

FIVE BUSY STORES IN 
COLORADO SPRINGS 



Suits and Overcoats 
Cleaned and Pressed 

$1.00 



Quality 



Neckties cleaned 15c each 



Jaundry 

",".^ Dry Cleaninq 



Service 



WAGNER-FULTS STUDIO 

Bums Theatre Bldg. 
Exclusive Photographers for the 

PIKES PEAK NUGGET 



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and Ready to Use 

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CUSTOMARY CHRISTMAS 
PLAY TO BE PRESENTED 



By Marjorie Ferguson 

Christmas approaches, and once 
again the co-eds of Colorado Col- 
lege bring to the college their an- 
nual play. Eager Heart. 

Eager Heart is one of the oldest 
and one of the most beautiful of 
Colorado College traditions. It is 
a Christmas play whose charm lies 
m its simplicity of theme, character 
and setting. It is a medieval play 
centering around a young girl. 
Eager Heart. Through her belief 
the miracle of the coming of Jesus 
re-occurs in her cottage. This scene 
with the angels in the background 
is one of the most beautiful and pic- 
turesque in the whole play. 

The cast is almost complete, and 
will be announced next week. The 
play is being coached under the di- 
rection of Mrs. Beatrice Fitzwater 
Barnes of the Dramatic Department. 



Margaret Rhoads and Maxine 
Moore, Colorado college students, 
will take part in the program at the 
meeting of the Junior Music club 
which will be held at the Little 
theatre at four o'clock this after- 
noon. Miss Moore will give a piano 
selection, and Miss Rhoads will sing. 



Amateur Rules Prevent 
Car Gift to "Dutchman' 



Friday morning of last week the 
Colorado Springs Gazette, an- 
nounced that citizens of Pueblo 
planned to give "Dutch" Clark a 
car after the Thanksgiving game. 
The athletic committee of Colorado 
College feared that such a gift 
would be considered a violation of 
the Rocky Mountain Conference 
Rule on amateur standing. This 
fear was confirmed by a vote of 
the eligibility committee of the con- 
ference which ruled by a 2 to I 
decision that by the acceptance of 
such a gift Clark would forfeit ihis 
amateur standing. The decision of 
the eligibility committee was con- 
s deied tantamount to a conference 
ballot. Mr. Hoag of the Pueblo 
newspaper sponsoring the gift was 
then persuaded by the athletic com- 
mittee to discontinue the effort to 
collect money for the gift. 



Miss Marian Coles spent Satur- 
day, and Sunday, November 23, 
and 24, in Denver. 



Kimzey, Lay ton 
Play On Sunday 



The Programme for the Bemis 
Hall Coffee Hour on Sunday, at 
I :45, was made up of Dramatic 
Readings by Jane Kimzey, a pupil 
of Mrs. Beatrice Barnes, of the 
Dramatic Department of Colorado 
College, and Piano Solos by Billy 
Layton, a pupil of Dean Hale of the 
Music Department. 

PROGRAMME 
Hide and Seek - - - - Schumann 
Pleading Child - - - Schumann 

Billy Layton 
Counsel Retained - - - 

- - Constance D'Arcy Mackay 

Jane Kimzey 
Hungarian Rhapsody - MacDowell 

Billy Layton 
The Silver Lining - - - . - 

- - Constance D'Arcy Macay 

Jane Kimzey 



NEW MEXICO PRESENTS 
IBSEN'S "WILD DUCK" 



At New Mexico University, Theta 
Alpha Phi is producing "The Wild 
Duck" and have already picked a 
cast for it. The New Mexico Lobo 
claims, "This play is the most am- 
bitious effort ever attempted by 
any university drama club." A 
complete cast has been selected for 
this and the entire five acts will be 
given. Also at this university, short 
one act plays are presented from 
time to time in the student assem- 
bly. The drama club is also spon- 
soring a Monday broadcast of dra- 
matic work over KGGM. Among 
the progrcms planned for this are: 
Dusany's "Lost Silk Hat," Scenes 
from "The School for Scandal," 
last scene in "The Doll's House" 
and The Other Wise Man" by Hen- 
ry Van Dyke. 

Theta Alpha Phi at Wyoming 
University will present "Declassee" 
by Zoe Atkins, in December on Fri- 
day the thirteenth. The next pro- 
duction is to be "Aren't We All." 
Also this dramatic fraternity has re- 
ceived permission to produce "Jour- 
ney's End" from R. C. Sheriff, the 
author, and this is the first time 
that any college ihas been given the 
rights to stage this remarkable suc- 
cess. 



Misses Virginia Raywood 
I Hermina Kahn spent the week- 
at home in Denver. 



HUGE FOLLIES SHOW 
GLORIFIES LOCAL CAST 



America 



Twenty-One College Men And : 
Women Take Part In Spec- | 
taculfir Production 



By Velma Rose 

One hundred and seventy five 
people are taking part in the an- 
nual presentation of the American 
Legion "Follies of 1929" put on 
under the auspices of the local 
Junior League and directed by Mrs. 
Dan Hampton. The play was pre- 
sented Monday and Tuesday, to a 
full ihouse, and considerable pa- 
tronage is expected for the Wednes- 
day matinee as well as for the eve- 
ning performance. 

Of an unusually spectacular or- 
der, the follies gave many interest- 
ing and novel numbers both in solo 
and in chorus. Gorgeous cos- 
tumes predominated and charac- 
terized each act. The Junior Lea- 
gue Ballet was nothing short of ar- 
resting in its colorings of lavender. 

The chorus made up of High 
School students, gave a startling 
dancing effect of black and white. 

The Valentine Act was a panto- 
mine of two lovers, presumedly and 
a large Valentine on one side in 
which the proverbial cupid rested. 
The wedding number was an inter- 
esting act depicting the various 
wedding costumes of former times. 

The act presented by the Colo- 
rado College students was carried 
out in a color scheme of black and 
gold. It consisted of a chorus of 
nineteen people. John Thurston, 
Elvin Griffith, and Duke Tucker 
took the lead in singing various 
collegiate numbers in the accom- 
paniment of dancing couples. The 
Blue Bird act was carried out to 
the theme song of "Feathering a 
Nest." Mary Hawks and Claire 
Jenks took the lead. 

As a striking climax, twenty-four 
girls in the first finale, formed a 
wheel of four spokes; each spoke, 
reijresenting a different color. The 
last finale was a Spanish act in 
which fifty girls dressed in Spanish 
shawls promenr.ded in front of the 
curtain before going on the stage 
to do a tamberine dance. 

Of gorgeous coloring and ef- 
fects, the entire production de- 
serves commeration and those Colo- 
rado College students taking part 
were especially good. 



Now Playing 

"THE TRIAL OF 
MARY pUGAN" 

with 
NORMA SHEARER 

H. B. WARNER ! 

Starts Saturday 

GEORGE JESSEL 

in 

"LOVE, LIVE AND 
LAUGH'^ 

Coming Attractions 

"HOLD YOUR 

MAN" 

"SHANNONS OF 

BROADWAY" 

"ROMANCE OF 

^ THE RIO GRANDE" 

t Greater Than Old Arizona 



ACT FOR THE MOVIES 

Alexander Film Com- 
pany wants exper- 
ienced and inexper- 
ienced motion picture 
actors and actresses. 
Personal interview 
only at I p. m., Mon- 
day, Wednesday and 
Friday at Alexander 
Industries Building. 



Only 19 More 

Shopping days before 

Christmas. 



for hot, clean 

clinkerless fuel 

— call the "coal phone' 

M 577 




FMEMEW 
COAL/ 



10 



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car that includes 

Proper Lubrication 

100% Alemite 

LEADING MOTOR OILS 

Weaverized Washing 

Tire Repairing Road Service 

Drive in Today 



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FENT a'AAVNING CO 



Awnings and Camp Supplies 



PLAZA 

DINING 
ROOM 

"The Place to Ear 

Breakfast Luncheon 

Dinner 



REX HOTEL 

Colorado Springs 



"Better Equipped Than Ever 
To Handle College Trade." 



CAMPBELL'S 

BARBER SHOP 



109 East Pikes Peak Avenue 

■ H ' H i ■ H ' H i t i»ii« n ii»ii»i.» m i.»..»i.«ii»i.»i ■ » %^ 



SPECIAL TRAIN IS 
MADE FOR PUEBLO 



For the football game at Pueblo 
November 28 the D. & R. G. W. 
will operate a special train, as fol- 
lows: 

Going Trip 
Leave Colorado Springs — 12:30 

noon 
Arrive Pueblo '(At the Stadium) — 

1 :30 P. M. 

Return Trip 
Leave Pueblo (Stadium) About — 

5:00 P.M. 
Arrive Colorado Springs About — 

6:00 P.M. 
The schedule for the special train 
IS arranged so the students and 
fans may have lunch at home, go 
to the game, step off the train at 
Nmth Street, adjacent to the sta- 
dium; board the train at the sta- 
dium and return to Colorado 
Springs in time for an early 
Thanksgiving Dinner. 



Serenade Enjoyed 
By Women in Halls 

Had I been perched beneath the 
open window of a certain room in 
Bemis Hall last Sunday nite about 
ten-thirty my auditory nerves might 
have sensed the following, which I 
thought might be of interest to cer- 
tain Tiger readers. 

Bang! Bang! Boom! "Eeeee- 
eeek, kho's shot? Oh, Helen, douse 
the light and pull up the blind 
quick. Ooooh, I'm scared to death, 
that's better. Oh, look! No one's 
being murdered after all. Gee! 
isn't that cute. There's a covered 
wagon out in the middle of t h e 
quadrangle. And, oh Kid, there 
are two cowboys lighting a fire. 
Listen! they're singing,. 'Come gath- 
er all ye merry men.' I've heard 
that before, Helen, do you know 
what, those fellows are Kappa Sigs 

November 24, 1899— BOULDER 
BADLY BEATEN— Betting was two 
to one on Boulder. Yet after an 
hour and ten minutes of fierce play- 
ing Colorado College left the field 
with seventeen points in her favor 
while the lordly Boulderites had 
but a paltry five. It was a victory 
won by a fierce determination and 
fiercer play on the part of o u r 
team, and by the enthusiastic, all 
powerful all-conquering college 
spirit that possesses every student 
in our little college at the foot of 
Pikes' Peaw. 



Science Men Of Two 

States To Meet Here 



(Contlnuea from page 3) 

the Physics section. Dr. W. F. 
Drea, of the Colorado Foundation 
for Research in Tuberculosis, will 
also submit a paper. Elimination of 
Radio-Interference and Protection 
of X-ray Tube in X-ray Apparatus 
During Continuous Operation, be- 
fore the Physics Section. Prof. W. 
C. Binkley is on the committee of 
the Social Science Section, and Dr. 
W. L. Abbot, together with Dr. E. 
B. Renaud, will briefly discuss a 
collection of archaeological material 
from the Southwest before this sec- 
tion. Dr. R. J. Gilmore, head of 
the Biology department, wil Isubmit 
a paper. The Renal Portay System, 
before the Zoology section. Before 
the geology section Prof. I. A. 
Keyte will submit a paper, An 
Apishapa Fauna from near Trini- 
dad, Colorado, and Prof. H. E. 
Mathias will submit two papers, 
Origin of Calcareous Sandstone 
Concretions in the Fox Hills For- 
mation near Colorado Springs, and, 
An Occurence of Pyrite Having a 
Bearing on its Origin. 



Peak Air Commerce To 
Offer Ground Course 



Meeting three times a week at 
nights in Cutler Hall, a class in 
aeronautics is given complete 
ground school work by Professor 
Page of Colorado College, Joe 
Leonard, and Walter Van Haitsma. 
The latter two are connected with 
the Alexander Industries. 

This class is conducted in con- 
nection with the flying instruction 
of the Pike's Peak Air Commerce 
and gives the candidates complete 
ground school work in order to en- 
able them to pass the department 
of Commerce pilots' tests. 

The subjects given are: theory of 
flight, meteorology, air commerce 
rules and regulations, structures and 
riggings, navigation, and airplane 
motors. 

Although at the present time this 
course is not connected with the 
college, it is hoped that next year 
Colorado College in connection 
with the Alexander Industries will 
be able to offer a complete course 
in aeronautics. 



September 21, 1899— There has 
been a large registration this year 
and about 300 students are now en- 
rolled in the college and academy. 



FOR PLUMBING AND HEATING WORK 

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"Where Your Dollars Have More Cents" 



CADILLAC 



ani 



CHRYSLER 

MOTORCARS 

Adams Motor Co. 

Marksheffel Building 



Hey-Service 

The 
HEYSE SHEET 
METAL WORKS 

INC. 

219 N. Weber 
Main 552 



W. I. Lucas 

HAS 
EVERYTHING IN 

SPORTING GOODS 
"Tigers always welcome" 

119 N. Tejon St. 
Main 900 



Photographs of our Colorado 
mountains. Nicely made — 
attractively colored by hand. 
Moderate in price — framed 
or unframed. 

H. L. STANDLEY 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs 



DUTCH 

for touchdowns and DUTCH 
(Hammond) for new driver- 
less cars. 

New Fords 7c per mile; 
30c per hour. 

New Cheve Six's 8c per mile; 
35c per hour. 

Office 

ELK HOTEL 

Phones M. 346 and 2065 
Free Delivery 



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11 



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Four Men Finish Football Careers 



Thursday in Pueblo four of the 
Tiger squad will see their last serv- 
ice on the field for Colorado Col- 
lege. The loss, in mere numbers, 
is small — only one-sixth of the 
squad — but the men have each oc- 
cupied a place in the lineup, and 
in the hearts of their teammates 
I nd those who rooted for them 
throughout the last three years, that 
can be but indifferently filled by 
anyone who might rise in next sea- 
son's crop. They have liked it, and 
would prefer not to leave; and ex- 
pect no tribute from a pen so hum- 
ble as this, so that only a mention 
can be made of their names and 
positions with a word of thanks and 
a hearty farewell. 

Captain Earl Clark, All-American 
Quarterback, 1928, has meant more 
to the conference standing of his 
school, to the glamour of the game 
as we see it in the west, and to the 
feme of the Rocky Mountain Con- 
ference than any man in the mem- 
ory of the oldest alumnus. In his 
three years he has never been out 
of a game because of injuries for 
a moment, and has missed scoring 
in only one game. Neither has he 
appeared at a meeting of any kind 
where he was likely to be called 
upon to talk. 

Ed Parker, without ever having 
had any basketball training, within 
our ken, has nevertheless developed 
a style of play we might well dub 
"the roving guard." A runner of 
national rank, he has such superior 
endurance that after a play .has 
passed the line of scrimmage he 
loiters there no longer, but sprints 
down paralled to the ball, much to 
the annoyance of secondary de- 
fense men who he blocks off from 
the ball. He is champion volunteer 
interference man. 

Bill Southard has won his letters 
by line play of a wriggling subma- 
rine type. Whenever the referee 
imprtiently delves into a pile-oip 
which netted the opposition no gain 
there will be Squatto at the bottom 
of the pile ,the frowing cause of it 
all. With a jerk of his pants and 
a thump on his headgear he waits, 
still frowning, to burrow under the 
next play. 

John Cogan emerges from a 
maze of afternoon classes and "A" 
rverr.ges to show himself a football 
player of such desperate purpose 
as to put the Terrible Turk to 
shame. John won his letters by his 
continuous attack of sheer clawin- 
and bitin', and he has left his lit- 
tle blue trade mark on many an 



opposing half who tried to take the 
end out, and ended still trying. 



Intra Mural Meet 

At Broadmoor Pool 



The Intramural swimming meet 
will be held at the Broadmoor Ho- 
tel swimming pool on the follow- 
ing week after Thanksgiving. This 
meet should attract the attention 
of all the fraternities in the school 
as the points are so planned that 
a fraternity who has no points now 
will be able to copy the intramural 
cup. 

An admission of ten cents will 
be charged. The committee in 
charge of the meet is composed of 
William Van Dyke, Milton Spreng- 
er, and Robert Roebke. 

The rules governing the meet: 

1. Not less than four men from 
each fraternity may be entered to 
form a team. 

2. Each man is allowed to enter 
only two events including the re- 
lay. 

3. Points — 

First Place— 250 points 
Second Place — 150 points 
Third Place— 100 points 

4. Events (in order) — 

1 . 25 yard Free Style 

2. 50 yard Breast Stroke 

3. 50 yard Free Style 

4. 25 yard Back Stroke 

5. Towing Contest 

6. 100 yard dash 

7. Plain and Fancy Diving 

8. 100 yard Relay 



BOULDER-C. C. GAME 



rr'.nUnuGd from page 3) 

McGrory, Hap Starbuck, and 
Hayden were the main corks in the 
Tiger line, but their playing was not 
enough to stip the triple threat that 
Boulder had to offer in the back- 
field. These three were back of 
every play, and when the announc- 
er said that a man had been 
stopped at the line of scrimmage, 
one of this trio were sure to be 
hanging on his heels. 

C. U. scored both counters in the 
first half, altho they made some ser- 
ious threats in the last two heats. 
McKelvy intercepted a Clark pass 
in the last heat, and reeled off 36 
yards before he was downed, he al- 
so got away to the longest run of 
the day when he go loose for 51 
yards — one of the runs that nearly 
developed into disaster. 



Frosh Gridmen 
Play Last Game 

On Thanksgiving Day the Tiger 
yearlings will take the field for the 
last time as a Freshman squad 
when they meet the Grand Junction 
Junior College Mavernicks on the 
latter's home field. These are the 
men who probably will entrain 
Wednesday evening for the 350 
mile journey: Rahm, Thomas, Hall, 
Weidman, McClurg, Roark, Mof- 
fat, Ryan, Fries, Stillman, Walters, 
Butler, De Holtzer, Bradshaw, 
Schnurr, Owens, Pullium, Mercer, 
Jones, Deutsoh, and Chestnovitch. 
Coaches Vandenberg and Rossener 
do not announce a starting line up, 
but they assure us that many new 
men will see action. 

This is the fourth game of the 
Tiger campaign. So far, the rec- 
ord goes: Two scoreless ties, one 
with the University of Denver, one 
with the Wyoming Freshmen, and a 
stinging 33-0 defeat by Western 
State in the Bengal's previous ad- 
venture across the Divide. The 
Tigers hope to end everything hap- 
pily by a victory in this last game. 

The game means as much to the 
Grand Junction fans as their tur- 
key dinner. The red-and-white- 
clad warriors depend largely on 
off-tackle slashes and line-bucks 
for yardage, and they have been 
winning a large part of their games 
with the teams over where red ap- 
ples come from. Awaiting the 
Tiger invasion, Coach Holt says, 
"The men are in tip-top condition," 
Leading the Mavernicks with more 
or less spectacular running exhibi- 
tions, is Don Marsh, 140 pound 
quarterback, while Whalley, Shep>- 
pardson, and Rigg are outstanding 
in the red-and-white line. All this 
does not lessen the Tigers determ 
ination to wind the season up right. 

September 16, 1915 — Constitu- 
tional Committee holds first meet- 
ing. The New Constitution is to 
be ready in two weeks. 

October 5, 1915— Eighteen Men 
Enroll for College Band. 

October 5. 1915— Attend chapel 
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 
Thursday and Friday mornings 
(Request of faculty). 

October 7. 1915— The Hypatia 
society will hold its annual autumn 
dance for new girls on Friday, Oc- 
tober 8, at McGregor gym. It is 
to be an afternoon affair. 



12 



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VOLUME XXXII 
Number 12 



Obc Colorado College <=^ 

ficaBitj 

OfTicial Students Publication 

December 6, 1929 







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ON INSIGNIA DAY, seniors wear caps and gowns for the first time in their college career. On 
this day, the faculty, the senior class, and the jun ior class take part in the program which gives the 
seniors recognition of their rank. This year, Insignia Day will be held on Thursday, December 12. 




Office of Pablication: 23 West Colorado Ave., Colorado Sprinss, Colo. 



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Telephone 1364 129 N. Tejc 



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(TH]E9 TIGER 



VOLUME XXXII 



Colorado College Weekly News Magazine 



Number 12 



MOTHER INDIA SUBJECT 
OF ILLUSTRATED TALK 



By Art Baylis 
"Mother India," the renown work 
of the past century, was the topic 
of an illustrated lecture given b y 
Gopel Singh Khalsa at Perkins 
Hall last night. The throroughness 
of this widely-read publication, 
pointed with percision to the clear 
understanding the lecturer had of 
his subject. 

Gospel Khalsa is editor of "Hin- 
dustan," India's highly influential 
newspaper, and is one of the best 
authorities on the political and ra- 
cial problems of that country. For 
several years he has held a ihigh 
position in the Indian National 
Congress and has been a leader in 
governmental affairs. 

His lectures in this country have 
been followed with much interest, 
showing a keen desire of the Amer- 
ican people to hear a native's view 
point on a book of India. Before 
returning to his home, Mr. Khalsa 
intends to speak and tour through- 
out all the United States. 

The illustrated part of last 
night's lecture was not only of the 
greatest possible interest to the 
audience, but also was startHng be- 
cause of the unusual material 
which it covered. Individual and 
group life in this far off country 
were expressed very clearly in this 
way. 

Throughout his talk Mr. Khalsa 
endeavored to give a reply to the 

(Continued on page 4) 



Hinkley Gets 
Lead in Farce 



Tryo'uts for this year's Junior 
Farce, "What Happened to Jones" 
by George Broadhurst, a well 
known playwright, were held Tues- 
day evening at the Little Theatre. 
A large number of the members of 
the Junior class tried out for parts 
in the play, and the large amount 
of material made certain a good 
cast. William Hinkley, Mary Stra- 
chan, and Genevieve Engel will 
take the leading parts. 

The cast: 

Jones William Hinkley 

Richard DeWitt Tucker 

Eben Clifford Vessey 

B'shop .-.Humphrey Saunders 

Holder - Jack Jacobs 

Bigbee John Thurston 

Fuller Al Giesike 

Mrs. Goolly Mary Straohan 

Cissy - ...Maxine Moore 

Marjorie Lorna Dorlac 

Minerva ....Matilda Willis 

Alvian Geraldine Williams 

Helma ..Genevieve Engel 

"What Happened to Jones" is a 
rollicking farce, and promises to 
work into a play of much humor. 
Art Sharp is directing the play, and 
Dick Vanderhoof is manager. 



Plaza Hashers Dance to 
Draw Campus Leaders 

The stage is all set for the sec- 
ond semi-annual Plaza Hashers 
promenade to be held this evening 
in the Peacock dining room of the 
Plaza Hotel. Sixty couples, com- 
prising practically the elite of the 
college, have been invited to at- 
tend, according to word yesterday. 

The terpsichoreans this evening 
will be the first group to dance on 
the new floor. For the past week 
contractors have been busy sand- 
papering, waxing, and polishing the 
ballroom floor, making it one of 
the best surfaces in Colorado. 

Walter Knodel has arranged an 
attractive decoration scheme based 
on the present modernistic theme. 
The entertainment committee has 
announced that there will be a ser- 
ies of vaudeville acts during the in- 
termission, featuring Al Brown and 
his new clogging routine. 



PIGSKIN WARRIORS DO FINALE 
OF 1929 GRIDIRON CAMPAIGN 



The 1929 fc 
captain, Clark, ir 



Bemis Dinner 
Served to Few 
College Women 



By Marie Hagemeyer 
The third annual meeting of the 
Colorado-Wyoming Academy of 
Science, which met with the Colo- 
rado Social Science association at 
Colorado College last week end, 
was well attended. One hundred 
thirty-eight were registered at Pal- 
mer Hall on Friday and Saturday. 
The program was carried out very 
successfully by members represent- 
ing various departments from the 
universities and colleges of Colo- 
rado and Wyoming. Members of 
the Colorado College faculty from 
several departments took an active 
part in the program. Departments 
represented at the meeting were: 
Plant Science, Zoology, Phycholo- 
gy. Education, Physics, Chemistry, 
Geology and Geography, Business, 
and Social Science. 

Following resolutions adopted by 
both organizations as a result of 
the meeting. The Colorado Social 
Science association was united with 
the Colorado-Wyoming Academy of 
Science. The Colorado Social Sci- 



jtball season closed for the Tigers and their brilliant 
a flashing game with the Mining Engineers on t h e 
field of Centennial High School, in Pueblo, hit Thursday. The game 
could hardly have been more to the satisfacticri of the townspeople who 
insisted that Clark's last game should be played in the old home camp, 
as the day found the Dutchman in top form, and furnished the Miners' 
ground-gainer, Carr, as a contrast. The game was characterized by 
twinkling heels and heady strokes 
from both quarterbacks, causing a 
large number of "breaks," and in- 
creasing the thrills-per-minute in a 
Thanksgiving game which was 
bound, at any rate, to keep both 
players and rooters on their toes. 

The Tigers' short kick-off missed 
the success it met in the Utah 
game, and the smartly executed 
quick punt of Carr on the second 
down put the ball deep in Black 
and Gold country. It took the 
Tigers until well into the second 
period to work the old olive into 
position for a drop-kick against 
these clever, evasive quick-kicks. 
Clark's kick rose only four feet, 
however, bounced off the ribs of a 
wresding blue-clad lineman, and 
straight back into Dutch's surprised 
embrace, for a first down — and a 
neat gain to boot. After a f e w 
goal line formalities Clark took it 
on across the line, and kicked goal. 
Toward the end of the half In- 
graham went in for Clark, to at- 
tempt a few mid-field passes. Inky's 
trick knee finally failed him later 
in the game, but only after some 
fine running and returning of punts. 

{Continued on page 5) 



Thanksgiving dinner, the biggest 
dinner given in the dining-room at 
Bemis Hall during the year, was 
served Thursday, November 28, 
1929, at one o'clock. There were 
not as many girls, faculty members, 
or guests present as usual on 
Thanksgiving, because many were 
attending the game at Pueblo. All 
those present sat at one large table. 



The Broadmoor Art Academy has 
on exhibition this week a group of 
paintings by artists belonging to the 
Artists' Gallery of Taos, New Mex- 
ico. The pictures are chiefly of 
western subjects. 



Science Academy Attracts 138 Teachers 



ence association will continue as a 
section of the Academy, giving up 
its name as a separate association. 
Announcement of this combine was 
made at the banquet given at Cos- 
sitt Hall last Friday night, where 
over 100 members from the two 
organizations were present. The 
decision was made by vote. 

Officers for the coming year 
were a'so elected at the banquet, 
Friday night. Dr. L. W. Durrel of 
Colorado Agricultural college was 
elected president. Dr. J. D. Heil- 
man, Colorado Teachers college, 
was elected vice-president. Prof. 
J. Harlan Johnson, Colorado School 
of M nes, was elected secretary. 
Prof. W. C. Binkley, Colorado Col- 
'ege, was elected treasurer. Prof. 
R. E. Niswonger, University of 
Denver, was elected a member of 
the executive committee. 

The Academy will hold its next 
annual meeting at the University of 
Colorado next year. The success 
of this year's meeting speaks well 
for the organization. 



Amendment Would Give 
Women Representation 

Freshman women will be allowed 
a representative on the legislative 
board of the Associated Women 
Students of Colorado College if an 
amendment to the constitution pro- 
viding for such a plan is carried 
when voted on at a mass meeting 
of the women of the college in Jan- 
uary. Tlie amendment has been 
recommended by the legislative 
board of the A. W. S. 

The amendment as proposed 
reads as follows: — "The women of 
the freshman class shall be entitled 
to one representative on the legis- 
lative board of the Associated 
Women Students, to be elected by 
the women of the freshman class 
at the beginning of the second se- 
mester." 



THE TIGER 



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OUR 

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SUGGESTIONS 



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PREINVENTORY 
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Wulff'i 



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per pair on 
your shoes 



Oxfords, Pumps, Evening Pumps 

$4.85 $6.85 $8.85 $9.84 

High grade foot^vear 
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$5.85 & $6.85 

Value up ta $10 



Do not fail to see these special 
bargains in Brown, Scotch, Grain 
Calf, Black Calf 

Wul/lShgeCa 

/■'fashionable-^ 
^ / <y footwear 

1 10 S. Teion Street 




ENDOWNENT DRIVE NOW 
ON LAST LAP OF RACE 



Chicago Campaign Opened This 

Week by President Mierow 

Prospects Are Good 

The endowment campaign for 
Colorado College is still going on, 
and will be continued for the rest 
of this week. 

Mr. Bissell, who is in charge of 
the work, said in an interview: "It 
is not expected that the city will 
reach its quota even this week, but 
a special committee is being chos- 
en to carry the movement forward 
until Colorado Springs has sub- 
scribed its full $500,000." 

This great drive has clearly indi- 
cated that the citizens of this city 
are solidly behind Colorado Col- 
lege and that they recognize the 
fact that they are inseparably 
united, for a greater Colorado Col- 
lege will mean a greater city. 

Persons from whom large gifts 
are expected will probably not 
reach a definite decision until the 
advent of the new year. No def- 
inite date has been set for the 
close of the campaign. 

In Chicago the banquet on De- 
cember 3, opened the campaign. 
President C. C. Mierow, Chairman 
van Diest, and Mr. Bissell were the 
speakers. The drives in New York 
and Boston will begin in January. 

All indications seem to point to 
a successful campaign and a great- 
er and stronger Colorado College, 
and they're serenading us. 

There come some more. Gosh, 
there's lots of 'em coming from 
everywhere. Don't they look just 
like real cowboys? Now they're all 
singing around the campfire. Oh 
Look! there's an orchestra in the 
covered wagon. Just listen, honey, 
two of 'em are singing a sweetheart 
song, don't that just about put you 
to sleep. Now they're all singing 
'Good Night.' 



Singh Khalsa Talks on 
Katherine Mayo's Book 

(Continued from page 3) 

enemies of India — or as he express- 
es it, "to give the truth about Miss 
Mayo's book." 

Through his connection with the 
Hindustan National Party of which 
he was formerly president, the 
speaker presents a typical state of 
the Indian affairs. He is known as 
India's own speaker and is present- 
ed by India, itself. 



Couture's 

French Cleaning and Dyeing Co. 

Phones 1288-1289 
218 N. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 



EAT 'EM UP TIGERS 

Then come down and eat 
that tasty 
Confection 

AL'S FRENCH 
FRIED POPCORN 

114 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 



FRANK SARLAS & CO. 

Shoe Shining and Repairing 

Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Quick Service 

132 E. Pikes Peak 



The Trip that Bankrupts the 
English Language 

CORLEY 

Mt. Highway 

Cripple Creek in high gear 



LOOK YOURBEST 

Have your hair cut in the 
approved manner. 

Pete's Barber Shop 

8 E. Cucharras St. 



You will Look and Feel Better 
after seeing us. 

Elk Barber Shop 

122 East Pikes Peak 



WHY NOT 

Learn Typewriting 
while attending Col- 
lege? Your teachers 
will appreciate type- 
written work to be 
checked. We can ar- 
range hours to suit 
your convenience. 



^Imri 




THE TIGER 



COVERS 
ALL THE FIELD 



SPORTS 



FOOTBALL 
CROSS COUNTRY EQUITATION 



Swimming Meet to {TIGER FROSH DEFEAT 



Be Held Saturday 

The intra-mural swimming meet 
will be held Saturday afternoon at 
three o'clock at the Broadmoor 
Hotel swimming pool. Since the 
outcome of the fall competition for 
the Inter Fraternity Council depends 
very largely on the outcome of this 
meet, interest in the first water meet 
is at a high pitch. 

A team will consist of four men, 
none of which may compete in more 
than two events. There will be 
eight events with first place count- 
ing 250 points, second place 150 
points and third piace 100 points. 
As the result of the tennis and 
horseshoe tournaments Kappa 
Sigma is leading with 1300 points 
and Phi Gamma Delta is in sec- 
ond place with 1000 points. 

The swimming meet should prove 
very interesting, and everyone is 
urged to be at the Broadmoor pool 
Saturday afternoon at three o'clock. 
Admission will be ten cents. 



GRAND JUNCTION 18-7 



Inquiring 

Reporter 



Miners Keep Bengals 

Going at Full Tilt 

CrvinHniiGH from page 3) 
On the last play of the half, Hart- 
man, carrying the ball for the first 
time in the game, had his ankle 
wrecked in a flying necktie tackle. 

Pomeroy completed his time for 
a "C" by playing a full ihalf, and 
notably among other things, nailed 
Carr once on the spot where he 
made one of his running catches. 

The last half was a glorious orgy 
of ground gaining, for both teams. 
The Mines line showed some im- 
provement, but was still unable to 
make first downs, so that Carr and 
Eads resorted to passing, with ex- 
citing, but unsuccessful, results. 
The Tiger line proved its ability to 
prevent Carr's getting either over, 
around, or through it for gains 
twice within their ten-yard line. 

In spite of a second touchdown 
against them the Miners still played 
hard and good-naturedly — Carr 
returned the last kickoff up the 
sidelines for sixty-two yards in 
about three seconds. Injuries to 
the key-men in the Golden offense 
contributes also to their lack of re- 
sistance. 



Twenty-three Freshmen saw ac- 
tion in the 18-7 Tiger victory over 
Grand Junction Thanksgiving Day. 
The team west of the Divide was on 
the defense most of the time, while 
the boys in Orange and Black 
passed, ran, blocked, and tackled 
superbly to score three touchdowns 
and win in spite of a seven point 
lead that the Mavericks chalked up 
in the first minute of play. 

A Tiger fumble on the opening 
kickoff gave Grand Junction the 
ball twenty yards from their own 
goal. Seven plays and the Red and 
White had scored a touchdown and 
kicked the extra point. Then the 
Tigers took the kickoff with Brad- 
shaw bearing the brunt of attack, 
they marched down the field to 
score before the quarter ended. The 
second touchdown came when 
Deutsch caught a pass that Roark 
had blocked and ran to the one- 
foot line. After a series of passes 
and off-tackle slashes, with Owens 
and Mercer doing most of the ball 
carrying, the Tigers again crossed 
Grand Junction's goal line in the 
third period. 

Near the end of the game, eleven 
men were substituted; and they 
continued to gain as readily as the 
first team, but were not able to 
score. 

The lineup: 

Right end: Stillman, Hall. 

Right tackle: Roark, Butler. 

Right guard: McClurg, Staple- 
ton. 

Center: Fries, Ryan. 

Left Guard: Beattie, Onufronk. 

Left tackle, Weidman, Vande- 
moer, Walters. 

Left end: Thomas, Rahm. 

Fullback, Schnurr, Jones. 

Quarterback: Deutsch, Brad- 
shaw. 

Halfbacks: Mercer, Butterfield. 
Owens. De Holtzer. 



CHOCOLATES 

Good as Made 

Box Goods a Specialty 

WALLACE CANDY COMPANY 



QUESTION 

What do you think of the Tigers' 
chances for a basketball champion- 
ship? 

ANSWER .. 

Sally Sheldon, — "I believe the 
team will be better than last year, 
and if the same Tiger spirit holds 
through basketball season, our 
chances are good." 

Glen Wade, — "This team is going 
right into the fight, and it's up to 
us to back them every step of the 
way." 

Jo Campbell,— "We will all be 
glad to see basketball season start, 
and I think the Tigers are going to 
win that championship." 

Council Recommends 

Constitution Changes 



Team Decides Not To 
Elect Football Leader 



The annual football banquet for 
the Tiger team, the Frosh team, 
the coaches, the trainers and man- 
agers was held Thursday evening 
at the Antlers Hotel. A large num- 
ber of Boosters of Colorado College 
attended. 

By common agreement, no cap- 
tain was elected by the football 
team for next year. It was decided 
that if Van de Graaff should find 
it necessary, a captain would be 
elected next fall. 



BASKETBALL TEAM WINS 
TWO PRACTICE GAMES 



The following is a list of t h e 
changes in the Constitution of the 
Inter-society Council as recommend- 
ed by the Council and passed by 
the Societies: 

Art. I, Sec. I, Clause 2: Resi- 
dence requirements: One semester 
in any time previous to election. 

Art. 2, Sec 2, on Special Credits 
shall read: 

The following shall constitute 
one-half a social credit: 

Clause I : Membership in Ko- 
share. 

Clause 4: Membership in Eta 
Sigma Phi. 

Clause 10: Permanent Commit- 
tees appointed by the A. S. C. C. 
and the A. W. S. 

Clause 12: Membership on the 
Legislative Board of A. W. S. 

Clause 15: May Fete Member- 
ship. 

Clause 27: Pan Pan. 

Art. 2, Sec. 5, shall read: There 
shall be one faculty member or the 
wife of a faculty member on t h e 
Council in advisory capacity, to be 
elected each year. 

Art. 2, Sec. 6 shall read: The 
President of the Inter-Society Coun- 
cil s,hall be a senior elected by the 
Council from one of the Societies 
rotating in the following order: 
Minerva, Contemporary, Hypatia, 
Zetathetian, beginning with Hypa- 
tia in the year 1 930- 1 93 1. 

Art. 4. Sec. I shall read: Each 
society shall be allowed one rush 
party lo take place anytime be- 
tvv-een registration day and mid- 
night Friday of the second week of 
school. 



Starting off the hoop season 
with a bang, the Bengals have won 
two games in as many played, but 
both of them have been tough ones 
to win. A week ago Tuesday night, 
the Tigers emerged victorious over 
Udick's Tire shop, Pikes Peak 
Commercial league team, by a 
score of 26-21, and last Tuesday 
night, the Bengals came out on the 
long end of a 26-22 score against 
the Crissey-Fowler Lumberjacks, 
last year's Commercial league 
champs. 

Although Coach Herigstad has 
been working his teams minus the 
services of "Dutch" Clark, phan- 
tom of the hardwood floor, Bill 
Hinkley and Juan Reid, stellar 
guards, his teams have been show- 
ing up very well. The above 
named three have not reported yet 
after a strenuous grid season. With 
Ryerson and Chaney in the guard 
positions most of the opponent's 
scores have been made from long 
shots near the center of the floor. 

Rex and Waters, last year's reg- 
ular forwards, have been working 
stellarly again this year and they 
will be hard men to oust from their 
regular berths when the Conference 
schedule gets under way. Potential 
strength has also been shown by 
Bill Van Dyke and "Slim" Slocum. 
last year's intramural stars. There 
is a good chance that these men, 
along with Bob Doyle, will work in 
as good reserves as strong players 
as the regular varsity and ready to 
shoot in the minute a first-choice 
man falters. It looks as though the 
guard positions may be taken over 
by new freshmen, but altho Reid 
and Hinkley were regular last year, 
they will have to fight like demons 
to hold their places. 

Prospects look bright for a good 
hoop season, opening here right 
after New Years with a three game 
series against Kansas Aggies in the 
city auditorium. 



You may save with this Associa- 
tion, any amount from one dollar 
up per week or month. 

We invite college students lo call 
at our office (Ground floor loca- 
tion) I 16 North Tejon Street, Colo- 
rado Springs. 

E. C. SHARER, President 
1 1 6 North Tejon Street 



THE TIGER 



Member of Rocky Monntain 

Inter-CoUegriate Press 

Association 




The Colorado College 

Newspaper, 

Published Weekly by the 

Students. 



THE TIGER 

ArtJcleS intended for publication should be left in the Tiger Box, on the first 
floor of Cobum library, by Wednesday noon. No unsigned contributions will be 
published. 

LLOYD H. ELLIS Main 1975 Editor 

James Keyser Associate Editor Barratt O'Hara ...Desk Editor 

Chauncey H. Blodgett, Jr Sport Editor Margaret Gillen Society Editor 

Mark Perkinson Feature Editor John W. Haussermann, Jr Lit. Editor 

REPORTERS 



Melba Adams 
William Baker 
Margery Barkley 
Art Baylis 
Arthur Bishop 
Carl Burke 



Marjorie Gilbert 
Frances Glau 
Clifford Goodson 
Wayne Campbell 
Effie Gilbert 
Marian MacMillan 



Margaret Crissman Marie Hagemeyer 



Wilmoth Harris 
Archie Hess 
Don Horton 
Hermina Kahn 
Fred Nichols 
T. E. Nowels 
Hartley Murray 



Velma Rose 
Marianna Saekett 
Ivan Schweninger 
Ralph Smith 
Kendrick Stone 
Tom Tate 
Clifford Vessey 



JAMES PATTERSON Main 2575 Manager 

Frank Dentan, Jr Advertising Manager 

Advertising — Harry Wood, Nelson Brown, Max Schmidt, Byron Whaley, Doc Gulick 
and Homer Bruce 

Merritt Ritter Circulation Manager 

Assistants — Glen Wade, Jack Fisher, Charlotte Pipkin, Elsie Winship, Marguerite 
Smith, Ruth Griffin and Margaretta Barr 



CoUege Courtesy 

In the last week's mail, there came a letter from one of the Colo- 
rado College alumni who returned for our last Homecoming celebration. 
He writes in part: 

"After twenty years I was one of the Home-comers. My fraterni- 
ty .. . was glad to see me. The boys made me feel at home, and acted 
as though they really meant that Homecoming invitation to alumni. You 
would be surprised how much that meant to an old broken down, dis- 
illusioned Grad." 

"But I had one experience. Another 'Old Grad' invited me to visit 
his fraternity house with him. A smiling pledge met us at the door. 
We went into the hall. The active chapter men were sprawled around 
the living room. They didn't get up nor did they speak. The pledge 
invited my friend to the Alumni Reception that evening. He expressed 
a desire to attend and asked the hour . The pledge didn't know, but 
inquired three times of the active members. They didn't even answer 
him. We went outside, shook the dust off our feet ,and such was my 
friend's fraternity Homecoming. He is a prominent man, successful in 
him. We went outside, shook the dust off our feet, and such was my 
the same thing has happened to him." 

For the latter his fraternity meant as much to him as anything 
college gave him. Today, his ideas of fraternity are changed. A lit- 
tle courtesy would have turned that man's homecoming from disappoint- 
ment to pride in his chapter, and both would have received much in the 
exchange. 

Are college students forgetting themselves? Even underneath the 
corduroy and leather jackets, one likes to think that there are manners 
and politeness to the ninth degree. One may like to play, but one would 
also like to think that a man can slip off those corduroys and slide into 
a "Tux" and be a gentleman. High school students, when asked what 
ihey come to school for, do not think only of their studies; they think 
of society, fraternity, and those things which will bring to them a certain 
poise and polish. If a fraternity does give this polish, it should be on 
the surface when guests and alumni are bemg entertamed. 



Students Are Recognized 

To give students recognition for being students in this age of ath- 
letics, fraternities, and societies is a worthwhile project. One hears of- 
ten of the football star, the good actor, the president of the class, but 
it is seldom that a person is commended for being a student. Often a 
conscientious student just wonders what good all his studying is good 
for. His neighbor slips through with a "C"; and he works three times 
as hard to get a B. And although grades do not necessarily mean know- 
ledge, a conscientious student likes to see good marks on his card. 

It is especially a good thing to commend as well as criticise report 
cards. Good students should receive attention for their good averages 
jiust as much as poor students. A kind word helps a great deal when 
there is a struggle whether it be in the class room or on the gridiron. 



Hour Glass 



September 21, 1899— The foot- 
ball team wishes to take this 
means of expressing it's very great 
indebtedness to the young ladies 
who so kindly volunteered to sew 
on pads on the players' sweaters, 
and did it, too. 

.«. .«, .*. 

September 21, 1 899— Minerva's 
opening meeting on Friday after- 
noon lacked none of the enthusi- 
asm which characterized last year's 
work. The President, Miss May, 
in the inaugural address urged the 
members to continue their interest 
in literature, music, art, and par- 
ticularly in the subjects of public 
concern. 

September 28, 1899— It is safe 
to say that if the Tigers are beaten 
this year it will be because Golden's 
team is a veritable crackerjack for 
every student of Colorado College 
has adopted the warcry, "Golden 
must be beaten." 

October 4, 1899— A fine of fifty 
cents and costs will be charged any 
member of the college or academy 
found eating lunches on the Libra- 
ry Lawn. 

October 9, 1899— Since gym is 
to be compulsory this year and the 
"cut system" is also to apply, the 
girls are wondering if a flunk in 
this course will stand in the way of 
a degree. 

October 4, 1899— Once more we 
wish to impress upon the young 
ladies the necessity of another Lit- 
erary Society. Minerva's lists are 
too crowded. No girl can get the 
best out of college unless she is a 
member of a society. 



Exchanges 

Princeton, N. J. — ^A great boor 
to alumni and other football nut; 
seems possible. A contributor tc 
the Princeton alumni weekly has a 
simple method by which everybodj 
at a game can have as good a seal 
as anybody else. It is to build a 
stadium on a track and have it re- 
volve during the game. 

The co-eds at D. U. asked the 
men what they thought about Ions 
skirts. None of the three mer 
dared venture an opinion and the 
Clarion says that that "just suited 
the co-eds." Now they can do 'whal 
they darn please' — which they 
would have done anyhow. 

The Denver Clarion gives its own 
version of the motto that is so braz- 
enly displayed above Palmer as fol- 
lows: "The truth shall make you 
free, sometimes. Oftener it would 
send folks to jail." 



Official Notices 



Members of the Tiger staff 
should watch the bulletin board at 
Palmer Hall on Monday and Tues- 
day of each week for their cissign- 
ments for the following Friday's 
Tiger. All copy, unless designated 
especially, must be in the Tiger Box 
in Cobum Library by Wednesday 



Seniors should make arrange- 
ments for their caps and gowns im- 
mediately as Insignia Day is De- 
cember 12. Caps and gowns may 
be purchased at Barnes-Woods. 



Miss Vera Buck, Miss Ada Free- 
man, Maxine Moore, and Thomas 
Estill went to Denver Monday to 
attend the presentation of a Span- 
ish play. 



Literary 



LONLINESS 



ISc 



A sullen, shuttered house crouching behind a clump of bushes. 
A purple silhouette of tall, bleak hills leaning against a radiant 

western sky. 
And wispy tendrils of fog climbing slowly out of the valley to wrap 
grey arms around the house. 
I Hear— 

The whimpering of a whip-poor-will as the dusk drags itself across 

the landscape. 
The rumbling menace of the serf against the weary rocks, 
And the laughter of two lovers a-walking on the beach. 
I Smell— 

The salt-flavored wind, wald clover and mint, honeysuckle and mig- 
nonette. 
But there is lonliness — 
always 

lonliness. 

—Molly Kule. 



THE TIGER 



We Make a Specialty of 

CLEANING AND DYEING MEN'S 

AND WOMEN'S SHOES 

GOLDEN CYCLE SHINE PARLOR 

Todd Colbert 

Lobby Golden Cycle Bldg. 
Tejon and Pikes Peak 



HOLLY SUGAR 

is 

the Best 

Sugar the essential food. 

HOLLY SUGAR 
CORPORATION 



Under New Management 

The College 
Barber Shop 

Ralph Schildknecht, Proprietor 

103 E. Cache la Poudre 
Colorado Springs 



Quality 

Cleaners and Dyers 

SUITS, O'COATS 

HATS $1.25 

U-Fone 1-8-1-1 We'll Call 

H. A. Thompson 
10 E. Kiowa 



PLAZA HOTEL BEAUTY SHOP 
Finger wave — Marcels 

Permanent Waves 

Phone Main 2515 



When you consider that you 
can purchsise any make type- 
writer on monthly payments 
as small as $5.00 it is not a 
question of affording it 

The essential question is if 
you can afford to be witholit 



.T-^ 



125 N. Tejon 



The 

Typewriter 

Man 

Main 95 



SOCIETY 



A bridge tea will be held at the 
Phi Delta Theta house, tomorrow 
afternoon at two-thirty o'clock. 
The following are included among 
those who have reserved tables for 
the affair: — Mrs. Charles Baggs, 
Mrs. Irvine Hunter, Mrs. Harry 
Holman, Mrs. Harold Hildreth, 
Mrs. A. B. Dewey, Mrs. T. E. Now- 
ells, Mrs. W. H. Spurgeon, Mrs. 
Douglas Corley, Mrs. F. W. Carroll, 
Mrs. D. A. Vanderhoof, Mrs. Har- 
old Frantz, Mrs. Howard Vester, 
Mrs. J. DeLongchamps, Mrs. Hil- 
dreth Frost, Mrs. W. H. R. Stote, 
Mrs. Ralph Merritt, Mrs. Elmer 
Stone, Mrs. Maurice DeNoya, Mrs. 
W. M. Jaillette, Mrs. Will Reinking, 
Mrs. G. N. Broyles, Mrs. L. A. Mil- 
ler, Mrs. Ed Honnen, Mrs. C. A. 
Rhodes, Miss Baker, Mrs. Luke 
Shepherd, Mrs. Walter Dean, Miss 
Jennie Rundquist, Miss Nelle John- 
son, Mrs. Clarence Underbill, Mrs. 
Mary Weir Wyman. 

The social calendar for the week- 
end includes parties at which three 
of the girls' societies will entertain. 
The Minervas will hold their dance 
tonight, and Hypatia and Zetalethi- 
an will have their annual Christmas 
parties tomorrow evening. 

Dr. Edith C. Bramhall enter- 
tained at tea last Saturday after- 
noon at Ticknor hall. Plans for 
Colorado College's taking paft in 
the model League of Nations as- 
sembly to- be held in Denver in 
February by representatives from 
the various colleges in the state 
were discussed. Chief Meyer, form- 
erly of Colorado College l)ut now a 
member of the faculty at the Uni- 
versity of Colorado explained the 
proposed plan. Leitia Finn, Jo 
Hildrich. Humphrey Saunders, Clif- 
ford Goodson, Robert Caldwell, 
and Basil Tipton were present. 

Mrs. William F. Nelson will 
speak on "Smith College" at t h e 
tea to be held at Bemis Hall a week 
from today. All Colorado College 
women are invited to attend the af- 
fair which is being sponsored by 
Hypatia society. 

Miss Amanda Ellis spent Thanks- 
giving at her home in La Junta. 

William D. Copeland went to 
Casper, Wyo. this week to assist in 
establishing the Casper Speakers 
college. Mr. Copeland was t h e 
speaker at its first meeting and will 
supervise class work. He expects 
to make a visit to the college every 
six weeks. He will visit the Na- 
trona county high school in the in- 
terests of Colorado College. 



Frank Seeley spent the Thanks- 
giving holidays in Albuquerque, 
N. M. 



The Kappa Sigma fraternity held 
its annual breakfast dance Thanks- 
givmg morning at the Broadmoor 
hotel. Breakfast was served 
promptly at 7:15 o'clock. From 
8 o'clock till ":30 o'clock dancing 
was enjoyed to the music of "Coits" 
orchestra. The programs were 
quite unipue, being m white leather 
adorned with the Kappa Sigma 
crest. The guests were: 

Mary McConnell, Marie Benning, 
Viola Buckley, Dorothy Chamber- 
lain, Elizabeth Skidmore, Mrs. L. 
M. Bowton, Randalin Trippel, Mar- 
abelle Evans, Marian MacMillan, 
Eleanor Watts, Louise Blake, Vir- 
ginia Easton, Evelyn Stubblefield, 
Jean Horan, Alice Aaby, Dorothy 
Baird, Margery Southmayd, Ruth 
Gordon, Katherine Poland, Mary 
Lawley, Jo Campbell, Naomi Black, 
Elinor McCleary, Dorothy Skid- 
more, Virginia Love, Dorothy Horn, 
Martha Herbert, Marjorie Gilbert, 
Charlotte Decker, Mrs. Troy Wade, 
Jane Homan, Virginia Patterson, 
Marian Fee, Grace Perkins, Sally 
Sheldon, Charlotte Pipkin, Lois 
Seebach, Dorothy McCrary, Doro- 
thy Faus, Marian Findlater, Lois 
Hardcastle, Margaret Tyson, Doro- 
thy Breeze, Mrs. Ralph Monell, Dr. 
and Mrs. C. C. Mierow, Dr. and 
Mrs. J. G. McMurtry. 



The guests at the Plaza Hashers 
Promenade this evening include 
Harold Cottner and Hariett King- 
sley, Al Brown and Virgina Dewey, 
Bill Thomas and Martha Herbert, 
Ralph Harris and Maxine Hunter, 
Walter Knodel and Marian Coles, 
Clark B'utterfield and Katherine 
Sweet, W. Edwin Rollins and Eve- 
lyn Jones, Glenn Wade and Jo 
Campbell, David Scott and Ruth 
Tom Frame, Carl Nelson and Mar- 
garet Bradfield, Bill Fales and Beth 
Smith, Will Walters and Edith Blotz 
Dale Merritt and Harriet Floyd, 
William Neumarker and Alberta 
Jones, Henry Roebke and Mildred 
Hazlitt, Harvey Reinkings and Mir- 
iam Lockhart, Sam Vickerman and 
Mary Kingsley, Owen B. Owens and 
Margaret Melis, and Barratt O'Hara 
II & Marian MacMillian. 

The chaperones are Mrs. Ella 
Clark, Mr. and Mrs. George H. 
Keener, and Mr. and Mrs. John 
Francis Sutton. 



Broken Lenses Duplicated 

Save the Pieces 

Eyes examined Lenses Ground 




Elizabeth Hayden, Bemis Hal 
spent Thanksgiving at her home i 
Breckenridge, Colo., and visited i 
Denver during the week-end. 



THE LAUTERMAN-DUGAN 

JEWELRY AND OPTICAL CO. 

Jewelers, Optometrists and 

Mfg. Opticians 

Fine Watch, Clock and Jeweby 

Repairing 
1 2 1 N. Tejon St. Phone Main 674 



"Better Equipped Than Ever 
To Handle College Trade." 



CAMPBELL'S 

BARBER SHOP 



109 East Pikes Peak Avenue 




lOS- 

^Service 

lES TIRES 

BICYCLES- C«S i OIL 

GARAGE TIRE SERVICE 

CORDUROY CORDS 

Sidewall Protection 



Fountain 
Pens for 
GIFTS 

— Wahls 
— Sheaffers 
— Parkers 

Not only the newest de- 
signs in desk sets and 
pocket styles, but also the 
continuous-point Pencils of 
each make to match the 
Pens. 

See the many different 
types — each splendid for 
a gift. 

We also have everything 
for the Kodaker. 




17 N. Tejc 



THE TIGER 



REX HOTEL 

Colorado Sprin^sS 



BUSY CORNER 
SHOE SHOP 

Shines — Shoe Repairs 
And Hats Blocked 

BEAT BOULDER 



Patronize Tiger Advertiser 



T. J. Collier T. M. Collier 

V. L. Collier 

TheCOLUER 

LUMBER CO. 

Phone Main 386 
543 W. Colorado Ave. 



^ 



Strachan's 
Sweet 
Shop 

Bijou and Nevada 

Try our Malts and Toasted 

Sandwiches 



&- 



Patterson, Ellis Attend 
Denver Press Convention 



THE J. S. BROWN 

MERCANTILE 

COMPANY 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



This week's Candy Special 



""' 35c lb, 



Sweets 



Barthel'S 

Tejon Street at 
Acacia Park Comer 



E. L. Bruce 

BARBER SHOP 

28 E. Kiowa 



Lloyd Ellis and James Patterson, 
editor and business man:\ger of the 
Tiger, left this morning for Denver 
to attend the Rocky Mountain In- 
tercollegiate Convention. The 
meeting w^ill be held Friday and Sat- 
urday, and the University of Denver 
will act as host. Every college 
newspaper in the region will be re- 
presented at the meeting which will 
be held for the seventh time. Reg- 
istration begins on Friday, and im- 
mediately after the registration of 
the delegates, there will be a lunch- 
eon served in the new home of the 
Kappa Sigma fraternity. The first 
business session will be held im- 
mediately afterward in the Little 
Theatre. This meeting will be feat- 
ured by a survey and rating of all 
conference newspapers by Sam 
Jackson, Pioneer publicity director. 
Twelve round table discussions in 
charge of conference editors and 
prominent Denver journalists will 
follow. 

Dinner will be served at the Kap- 
pa Sig house, and then delegates 
will be guests of the Play Produc- 
tion Class. 

Following the staging of this 
drama, Lucian Morgan and his col- 
legiate orchestra will play for an in- 
formal dance honoring visiting del- 
egates. 

Business sessions resume at 9 a. 
m. Saturday and will last until noon, 
when luncheon will be served. The 
football game between the Pioneers 
and the Regis Rangers will be free 
to all delegates, and the convention 
closes with a banquet Saturday ev- 
ening. 



RUTH SILLIMAN <i^ CAROL TRUAX 

Their Book Shop 

5 PIKES PEAK AVENUE. COLORADO SPRINGS COLO 

A wide selection of Books and Gifts for 
Christmas Consideration. 

Christmas Cards, Wrapping Papers, and Tape. 



HERIGSTAD'S RECORD 



Herigstad. who played three 
years of basketball at Colorado 
Aggies, jumping center then falling 
back to guard position, has achiev- 
ed success in the coaching field. 
His Pueblo Central teams have won 
the state title and placed fourth in 
the national high school meet. It 
was in this latter tournament that 
Dutch Clark was proclaimed all- 
American center in high school 
competition. 

"We'll practice every night from 
now on," Herigstad said last night. 
"It looks as tho we'd have a large 
squad, and I want to get a line 
on my material so that I can cut 
the squad wisely when the time 
comes. 

We'll stick to fundamentals for 
a little while." 



PIGGI^ICCIY 



^ 

ALL OVER THE WORLD 

FIVE BUSY STORES IN 

COLORADO SPRINGS 



WAGNER-FULTS STUDIO 

Bums Theatre Bldg. 
Exclusive Photographers for the 

PIKES PEAK NUGGET 





Hear Ye! Collegians — going home for the holi- 

/y days? Get the gang together, put on the dog, and 

/ /drive a new SAUNDERS SYSTEM car home. Five 

V // or more can drive a new SAUNDERS SYSTEM car 

<^ ' home over the holidays for less than railroad fare. 

, There's your SAVING — and you get added comfort 

j. and convenience, and complete independence. Ask us 

l| about our low long trip rates and complete estimates. 

D. C. HUTCHINGS. Mgr. 21 No. Cascade 

Phone Main 1800 Fords — Desotos — Chryslers 



[Drive It Yottrselfl 



SYSTEM 



VMemu' 



Saturday see the 

INTER-FRATERNITY Swimming Meet 

Broadmoor Pool, 3 P. M., Dec. 7 





THE TIGER 


9 


CURRENT ART EXHIBITIONS 
MUSIC 


THEATRE 


CINEMA REVIEWS— BOOKS 
DRAMA 



Lilting Melodies in 
.."Paris,"— Rialto Picture 

Paris is a city oi gayety and light 
and fun — and music. 

And "Paris," the First National 
picture starring Irene Bordoni, 
which opens Saturday, at the Rialto 
Theatre, is just like the city in all 
these respects — not least in that of 
music. 

The score of the production, in 
fret, is fairly overflowing with 
melody. Among the outstanding 
numbers are such tinkling and tune- 
ful creations as "Miss Wonderful," 
"My Lover, Master of My Heart," 
"Somebody Mighty Like You" and 
"I Wonder What Is Really On His 
Mind." 



JOAN CRAWFORD 



Frank Geddy Says-- 

And then there was a Scotch- 
man who found a package of 
corn plasters and bought a 
pair of tight shoes. 

The Shoe Shop 

Across from the High School 



Joan Crawford — a restless flame 
of a girl, flaring high one moment 
and dying down to a flicker the 
next — is coming to the Burns Para- 
mount Theatre Sunday, in "Un- 
tcmed," her first all-talking starring 
vehicle directed by Jack Conway. 

Miss Crawford is one of the in- 
teresting enigmas in pictures. A 
girl who is expected to be gay and 
hilarious, coveted for parties be- 
cause she can be depended upon to 
add to the occasion with a whirl- 
wind dance or smart line, and yet 
who sometimes breaks under the 
strain of trying to be "the life of 
the party." 

People think her happy-go-lucky, 
frank, wholeheartedly independent. 
Yet she is so sensitive that a blunt 
opinion often sends her into a dark, 
moody spell which she has to fight 
for hours. 

Joan Crawford wants the public 
to forget she is a dancer and re- 
member she is an actress and her 
work in "Untamed" should be a 
big step towards the realization of 
that desire. As a girl brought 'up 
in an uncivilized part of Central 
America and then transported to 
New York City with its entirely 
different demands and standards. 



Gifts 

for 

Men and 
NVomen 



(^ 









Naught can compare 
With Gifts to Wear 

—if it bears the ^arnes- IVoods label 



For Her 

A fitted traveling case 
A pair of Phoenix Hosiery 
Phoenix Undergarments 



For Him 

A Tuscany Weave Tie 
An Ambassador Shirt 
A silk scarf 
A pair of Fownes Gloves 



"Trade with the Boys" 



Pikes Peak at Nevada 



Eagerheart Cast Chosen 
By Mrs. Beatrice Barnes 

Mrs. Beatrice Fiizwater Barnes 
of the Dramatic Department of 
Colorado College, who is directing 
the annual Christmas Play, "Eager 
Heart," this year has announced 
the cast of the play. 

The cast of characters include: 

Eager Heart Elizabeth Smith 

Eager Sense Evelyn Hummel 

Eager Fame ...Maxine Moore 

Joseph — Wilmoth Harris 

Mary ..Alice Aaby 

Old Man ....Frances Glaii 

Young Man Rebecca Todd 

1st Shepherd Ruth Griffin 

2nd Shepherd ....Josephine Hildrich 

K>ng of Power Jeannette Case 

King of Wisdom 

Hattie Ruth Johnson 

King of Love Rosella Burbank 

Angels — Miriam Lockhart, Virginia 

Raywood, Margaret Crissman, 

Mary Frances Kingsley 
Managers: Marjorie Ferguson and 

Imogene Miller. 

Rio Grande at America 

Heralded as a gripping drama of 
the west, "Romance of Rio Grande,' 
a Fox Movietone production, with 
Warner Baxter, Mary Duncan and 
Antonio Moreno featured, comes to 
the America Theatre Sunday. 

Taken from the widely read novel 
"Conquistador," by Katherine Full- 
erton Gerould, the action unfolds 
around a youth, ostracized by a 
wealthy grandfather, and forced to 
make his own way in dangerous 
zones. 

"Romance of Rio Grande" 
seethes from the stormy skirmish 
with a band of outlaws and a crew 
of railroad workmen to the battle 
to the death between Baxter and 
Moreno. 

This picture, which was directed 
by Alfred Santell, has the added 
advantage of ihe speaking voice, 
and contains the elements of en- 
tertainment that hails a new type of 
western drama. 

"You're Sure They're Pure" 

Dern^ood 
Caramels 
at 35c lb. 

Made with cream — some hav- 
ing cream center layer — a de- 
licious assortment the feature 
for Saturday, the 7th. 

I I 

26 S. Tejon DCm'S 



AMERICA 




X/"* jWiUtwKfl^ 



ROMANCE o/ 
KiGGIMlVDE 




Greater than "Old Arizona' 

An Epic 

STARTS SUNDAY 

December 8th 



Go To 

Miller Music Co. 

"Where Music Is Sweetest" 
13 North Tejon Street 
for Records and Music 

GEORGE L. MILLER. Prop. 



RIALTO 

STARTS SATURDAY 

IRENE 
BORDONI 

T>arling oftheNelvYork 
andT-^aris stage in 



"Pa 



ns 



yy 



ALL 

TALKING 

DANCING 

SINGING 

MUSICALCOMEDY 



ith 



scenes m 



U^atural Colors 



10 



THE TIGER 




Servicesforyour 
car that includes 

Proper Lubrication 

100% Alemite 

LEADING MOTOR OILS 

Weaverized Washing 

Tire Repairing Road Service 

Drive in Today 



FIRESTONE TIRES 
117 N. Nevada Phone M. 202 



Dr. Bramhall Offers Prize For 

Best Model State Constitution 



ILOmIWa 




Awnings and Camp Supplies 



PLAZA 

DINING 
ROOM 

"The Place to Eat" 

Breakfast Luncheon 

Dinner 



REX HOTEL 

Colorado Springs 



FORESTRY CLASS TO BE 
OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS 



HUGHES^ 
CHOCOLATES 



Try our Saturday 
SPECIALS 



The Colorado School of Forestry 
at Colorado College is planning this 
year to make available to those 
who might be interested its course 
in the identification of woods with 
a hand lense by scheduling that 
course for this winter in the eve- 
ning. 

It has been thought that . the 
course might be of interest to high 
school instructors and students in 
the manual training courses and to 
men who are connected with t h e 
handling of woods in the lumber 
yards. The course is one which 
carries regular college credit for 
two hours but visitors may be ad- 
mitted to the course who do not 
wish to secure college credit. It 
is suggested that those who desire 
to secure further information about 
the course write to Professor J. V. 
K. Wagar, at Colorado College. 

The course usually covers the 
identification of some 75 specimens 
of the common commercial woods 
of the United States and a few of 
the more important foreign woods. 
Two evenings a week will be spent 
upon the work. 



December 18 Last Day 
For Nugget Pictures 

The call comes once again to 
turn in your pictures for the Nug 
get. According to Bill Fales, man- 
ager of the year book, the final 
date that you can have your pic- 
tures taken will be December 18th, 

There will be no group pictures, 
All organizations will have individ- 
ual cuts of each of their members 
and the arrangement of the organ- 
ization pictures will be taken care 
of by the Nugget staff. All that 
the students are asked to do is to 
have their photographs taken by 
the final date. All other arrange- 
ments, the number of cuts each 
student deserves, according to the 
number of organizations to which 
he belongs, etc., will be handled by 
the staff. 

The price of the pTiotographs at 
the Wagner-Fults studio, the offi- 
cial photographers of the Pike's 
Peak Nugget, will be $3.75 per doz- 
en. A wide choice of prints and 
folders will be given, which will en 
able everyone to order the kind of 
pictures that he wants for his own 
personal use at the same time that 
the official pictures are taken for 
the Nugget. 



Following the opening of a def- 
inite campaign in behalf of the 
constitutional convention in Co!o- 

do which, by virtue of legislative 
action, will come to a vote of the 
people in the fall of 1930, Miss 
Edith Bramhall, chairman of a 
committee of the Colorado Social 
Science Association to secure a 
constitutional convention for Colo- 
rado has announced a prize will be 
given to the student in her class of 
Political Science 1 who make out 
the best plan for a model gov- 
science class will be taking up state 
government in the second semester 
an dapropos of this question, which 
is to come before the voters next 
fall, the members of the wclass will 
work out a model state government. 
The Association's committee consist- 
ing of Dean Duncan of Denver Uni- 
versity, Prof. Frederick Bramhall 
of the University of Colorado, and 
Miss Edith Bramhall of Colorado 
College will be the judges who de- 
cide the prize. 

Miss Bramhall launched the 
move for a constitutional conven- 
tion at the meeting of the social 
science division of the Colorado- 
Wyoming Academy of Science 
which was in session last week. At 
the last session of the legislature, a 
majority of the house and senate 
voted for the proposal for a con- 
stitutional convention to be brought 
before the voters in the fall of 
1930. Miss Bramhall is strongly in 
favor of the legislative plan rather 
than the initiation of a series of 
amendments. 



CADILLAC 



an 



d 



CHRYSLER 

MOTORCARS 

■ Adams Motor Co. 

Marksheffel Building 



McClurg and Audience 
Fly Over Pikes Peak 



At eight o'clock this evening Gil- 
bert McClurg will take his audience 
on an imagination tour of Pike's 
Peak and the Rocky Mountains. 

Mr. McClurg is a lecturer of con- 
siderable note. He has given his 
Travelogue Tours in all the princi- 
pal cities of the United States, and 
has been a correspondent in differ- 
ent parts of the world. For many 
years he has been lecturing in the 
universities and halls of America. 

From an aeroplane the audience 
will fly above Pike's Peak, will dig 
into the past and discover a flour- 
ishing pre-historic civilization, will 
gaze at the mountains through the 
eyes of Zebulon M. Pike, will hunt 
wild game and birds with the lec- 
turer's camera, and will watch a 
golden sunrise above the clouds. 

Certainly Colorado Springs is 
fortunate in hearing such a noted 
lecturer. He will be assisted on the 
program by several musical num- 



Hey-Service 

The 
HEYSE SHEET 
METAL WORKS 

INC. 

219 N.Weber 
Main 552 



W. I. Lucas 

HAS 

EVERYTHING IN 

SPORTING GOODS 
"Tigers always welcome" 

119 N. Tejon St. 
Main 900 



Photographs of our Colorado 
mountains. Nicely made — 
attractively colored by hand. 
Moderate in price — framed 
or unframed. 

H. L. STANDLEY 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs 



DUTCH 

for touchdowns and DUTCH 
(Hammond) for new driver- 
less cars. 

New Fords 7c per mile; 
30c per hour. 

New Cheve Six's 8c per mile; 
35c per hour. 

Office 

ELK HOTEL 

Phones M. 346 and 2065 
Free Delivery 



i m ■i mn iitii 



THE TIGER 



11 



A SERVICE 
for Every Purse 



THE 
PEARL LAUNDRY 



REWARD! 

LOST— Black and white Sheaf- 
fer lifetime pencil. Return to Ralph 
Heter, Sigma Chi House. 



BUICK AND MARQUETTE 
MOTOR CARS 



Strang's 



Harry D. MacDonald 
President 



Made in Colorado Springs 

VAN BRIGLE 
ART POTTERY 

The world's most famous 
art pottery. 

Visitors always welcome. 



Wear a Tiger "Woolie" and "Mum' 
to the Game. 




30 N. Tejon Phone M. 214 



COLLEGE ATHLETICS 



American College Athletics is 
the subject of a report submitted 
by the Carnegie Foundation for the 
advancement of teaching "a friend- 
ly effort to help toward a wise so- 
lution as to the place of sports in 
our Educational System." The in- 
vestigation conducted over a period 
of three years was directed by 
Howard J. Savage, author of the 
study on sports in British schools 
and universities. 

The report is divided into twelve 
chapters covering such subjects as 
Growth of College Athletics, Ad- 
ministrative, Control, Hygiene of 
Training, The Coach, Extra mural 
rek.tionships, Recruiting and Sub- 
sidizing, The Press, Values of Ath- 
letics. 

The chapter given most publicity 
by the press is Recruiting and Sub- 
sidizing of Athletes. It covers 42 
pages in the 381 page report. In 
this chapter the Rocky Mountain 
Faculty Athletic Conference and the 
five schools visited are mentioned 
1 7 times for a total of less thnn 
ten hnes. These meager references 
have been the subject of much un- 
favorable publicity. 

Mr. H. W. Bentley the Founda- 
tions visitor to this district attended 
a conference meeting in Denver 
March 5, 1927. At that time he 
commented very favorably on the 
working of the Rocky Mountain 
Conference both as to the person- 
nel of its faculty representatives 
and the coaching staffs of the sev- 
eral institutions. He visited the 
Universities of Wyoming, Colorado, 
Denver, Utch and Brigham Young. 
In the matter of recruiting and 
subsidizing of athletes his evidence 
indicated that the evils resulting 
from these practices are not absent 
lu this conference but are held at a 
minimum. 

Colorado College is commended 
in a note for cooperation in t h e 
study of relative grades of Athletes 
and Non-Athletes. The compilation 
of these grades was made by Pro- 
fessor Albright. 



Rhone Main 1710 

IDEAL 

A CLEANERS 

5 West Colorado Ave. 



Valetor Pressing Service 



IF IT AIN'T AN ELECTION, 
IT'S FOOTBALL 

Lima, Peru. — A mob of 2,500 
persons stormed the Peruvian foot- 
ball federation building, smashing 
doors and windows and attempting 
to set fire to the structure because 
the Paraguay team had defeated the 
Peruvian, 5 to 0, in the semifinal 
match in the South American foot- 
ball championship played at Buenos 
Ayres. 

The crowd stood around a news- 
p. per building until the final score 
was received and then marched on 
the federation's building. The 
police had to use clubs to disperse 
the crowd. 



THE 

WHITE WAY 

SYSTEM 

Open Until 2 A. M. 

Try our delicious White 
Way ChiU 

11 N. Tejon St. 



"It Pays To Look Well' 

Alamo Hotel 

BARBER AND BEAUTY SHOP 

R. W. Counts, Prop. 
Phone Main 1255-W 124 S. Tejon 



The Colorado Leather 
Goods Company 

Manufacturers 

Trunks, Bags, Suit Cases, and 

Traveling Accessories 

122 East Pikes Peak Ave. 



THE 



Crissy & Fowler 

LL.sT^ER CO. 

MILL WORK 
BUILDERS' SUPPLIES 



Main 101 
1I7-127W. Vermijo 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiq 



STOCK BROS. 

Food Store 

119 East Colo. Ave. 

Fancy Dry Picked Turkeys, 
Pascal Celery, Plum Puddmg 
and etc. for your 

THANKSGIVING DINNER 

Main 4303 and 4304 



tl 



OWARD'S 

BARBER 
SHOP 



19 East Bijou Street 



The Colorado Planing 
Mill Co. 

MILL WORK OF ALL 
DESCRIPTIONS 

PADDLES 
Frank Mitchell, Manager 

Phone 2876-W 
525 W. Colorado Ave. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



ISAAC BROTHERS 

WATCHMAKERS and JEWELERS 

32 East Bijou Street 



PAUDRE-PAUFFE 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Permanent Finger and Watei 

Waving 

Manicure and Scalp Treatments 

Marcels 50c. 



for hot, clean 

clinkerless fuel 

— call the "coal phone' 

M 577 




mw 

COAL/ 



CITY COAL 

15 East Pikes Peak Avenue 

Phone 

Main 67 or 120 



The Ice Cream 
that's a C. C. 
"Institution" 

The between Class "Cones", 
t h e sandwich materials and 
candy, the ice creams and ices 
for class and club functions. 

From Frosh to Grad it's t h e 
place every Tiger knows. 

MOWRY'S 

Across from Campus 

Main 1183. 1184 



12 



THE TIGER 



Main Store 

21 South Tejoi 

Phone Main 

144 




North Store 

832 North Tejc 

Phone Main 

189 



MURRAY'S 

GIFT SUGGESTIONS 



FOR WOMEN 



FOR MEN 



Desk Sets 
Kodaks 

Perfume Sprays 
Perfume 
Cigarette Cases 
Cigarette 

Holders 
Manicure Sets 
Fountain Pens 
Stationery 
Photo Album 



Bath Room 

Scales 
Perfume Sets 
Bath Salts 
Compacts 
Candies 
Thermos 

Bottles 
Toilet Waters 
Traveling Sets 
Bridge Cards 



Flashlights 

Fountain Pens 

Pencils 

Desk Sets 

Cigars 

Cigarettes 

Pipes 

Cigar Holders 

Cigarette 

Holders 
Ash Trays 



Traveling Sets 

Razor 

Razor Stropper 

Military 

Brushes 
Thermos 

Bottles 
Playing Cards 
Bill Folds 
Cigar Cases 
Cigarette Cases 



See Our Unusual Assortment of Christmas 
Cards, Seals and Tags 




ypes 

from 

^bcQentan 
Qrintin^ 

Go. 



Colorado 
Springs 



Give Furniture for Christmas 



^ 



Here's Your 
Victor Kecord 

Come in and hear the latest releases in 
our ventilated trial rooms. 

HEADQUARTERS 

for RADIO 

VICTOR, MAJESTIC, ATWATER KENT 
CROSLEY BRUNSWICK 



GGriGSS 

FVRNITVRE K3i 

113-115 N. Tejon 



Cossitt Dining Hall 



FOR MEN 




Front view of Building 

THE COST IS MODERATE FOR THE 
BEST OF MEALS — IN CHARGE OF 
EXPERT DIETICIAN. 










<t~s. 



Office of Publication: 23 Weit Colorado Ave, Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE TIGER 



HOtlD 



eilEETIMier 



1929 

We Wish You 

A Bi g Merry 

Christmas 




Phone M. 2958 



1930 

May your New Year be a happy 
and prosperous one. We have ap- 
preciated your patronage and hope 
to serve you doing 1930. 



P^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^l^ 



m 



Yuletide Greetings 



I A. L STARK I 

I Typewriter Exchange I 

m Phone Main 4671 831 N. Tejon ^ 

m i 



^ AT LAST! m 

A Christmas Gift | 



m 



m 



that is: 

(jrladly Received! 

/\ 'ef reshingly Different ! 

r^^xquisitely Beautiful! 

y^niazingly Lasting! 

y imely! 

A Year of Happy Days ! 
For only 25c 

THE COLORADO COLLEGE 
1930 CALENDAR 

Secure your copies NOW at the 
office of the Secretary of the Col- 
lege in the Administration Build- 
ing. 

Issued Friday of each week. Entered at the 



m 



Post 



A Tuxedo 

— Is the finest of Gifts and there is no 
time in the year when one is required 
oftener than during the Holiday sea- 
son. 

"Trade with the Boys" 



Pikes Peak at Nevada 






'd 




^^^S^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



ARE YOU GOING HOME 



CHRISTMAS 

Make Wright's your Christmas Gift store and buy 
your gifts before you go home. New merchandise ar- 
rives daily to choose from. 

CHIFFON HOSIERY 




Hose in Kayser and other brands. Every desirable 
shade. All pure silk and sheer and dainty as Christ- 
mas hose must be. A gift that is always appreciated. 



TRIPLE 

COMPACTS 

79c 



BOXED 

HANDKERCHIEFS 

50c 



WRieHT- 



Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter. 



>rr mrv 



<^MMd Tie BR 



VOLUME XXXII 



Colorado College Weekly News Magazine 



Number 13 



MANY STUDENTS MEET TO 
DISCUSS MODEL LEAGUE 



Tentative plans for the participa- 
tion of Colorado College in the 
Model League of Nations Assembly 
to be held in Denver, probably 
early in M?rch, was drawn up by a 
group of those particularly inter- 
ested, at a meeting held in Ticknor 
Study Sunday evening. Since 
every college in Colorado is to take 
part, it is expected that each will 
take about four countries to repre- 
sent at the assembly, which is to 
be .held in the State House at Den- 
ver. Tentatively, it was agreed that 
Colorado College would take for 
discussion, China, Persia, Spain and 
The Dominion Republic, all bring- 
ing particularly interesting ques- 
tions to the League at the present 
time. 

Each school will have three or 
four members on the representation 
of each country, with one or two 
expert advisors along. Alice Gil- 
lett and John Hausermann have 
both spent much time in China, and 
their arguments for China and her 
problems should prove of particu- 
lar interest. Other assignments are 
not definite as yet. Those attend- 
ing Sunday evenmg, and who prob- 
ably will take part, include Frank 
Seely, N. Asami, Jo Hildrich, Bur- 
ton Paddock, Jim Keyser, Grace 
Perkins, Alice Gillett, Elizabeth 
Hayden, D. Stroud, John Hauser- 
mann, Letitia Finn, Humphrey 
Saunders, and Cliff Goodson. Miss 
Bramhall is faculty advisor and 
member of the organization com- 
mittee for the entire assembly. 

It is expected that a meeting will 
soon be held with the interested 
group from Colorado University, 
and it is probable that a very large 
program can be worked out be- 
tween the two. "Chief" Meyer is 
directing the work at Booilder 



Press Conference 
Asks Higher Wages 

Delegates from ten conference 
schools tttended the seventh an- 
nual Rocky Mountain Intercollegi- 
ate Press Association that met in 
Denver last Friday and Saturday. 
Discussions were conducted in t h e 
form of twenty round table meet- 
ings. 

It was voted at the conference 
the next meeting be held at Logan, 
Utah, two weeks before Thanksgiv- 
ing. Utah State College will be the 
host. Elmer E. Johnson, editor of 
the Branding Iron of the University 
of Wyoming was elected president, 
and Miss Leota Blaine, editor of 
the Top 0' The World of Western 
State College, was elected vice- 
president. 

It was recommended at the con- 
ence that "Conference editors and 
business managers are not receivmg 
large enough salaries." Fifty dol- 
lars a month was recommended as 
the minimum salary. At the con- 
ference is was suggested that the 
University of Colorado be called 
"State" and not Boulder College. 

The Brown and Gold, Regis Col- 
lege paper, was added to the of- 
ficial members of the association. 

James Patterson, Lloyd Ellis, 
Frank Dentan, and Max Schmidt 
represented Colorado College. 



ANNUAL COLLEGE VAUDEVILLE SHOW 
TO BE PRESENTED MONDAY EVENING 



With plans already well in hand, 
all indications point toward this 
yer.r's annual Magna Pan-Pan as 
be ng the best and most elaborate 
ever staged. The date is next Mon- 

Woodward, Clark 
Receive Presents 

The football squad and coaching 
staff were guests of honor at a 
pcst-se-son prrty Tuesday night 
given by Pat Ingersoll and Charlie 
Tutt, at the finely appointed moun- 
tain house of the Cooking Club, of 
which the hosts are members. 

Captain Clark presented Dr. 
Woodward, on behalf of the 1929 
Tiger squad, a fine leather coat of 
a rough tanned finish. 

"Doc" Weaver, as representative 
of the team, then presented Clark 
with a Krementz wrist watch band, 
engraved "Dutch", and "1929 foot- 
ball teammates," taking the retiring 
captain by complete- surprise. In 
receiving the token, "Dutch" broke 
his famous custom by saying a few 
sentences, in which he shared his 
past years' glory with his team 
mates and friends, and expressed 
his deep feeling for them. 



C. C. Will Entertain Debate Delegates 



Hulbert Will Talk 

At Voorhis School 



Mrs. and Mr. Archer B. Hulbert 
and (heir daughter Joan are leav- 
ing Friday for Claremont California. 
The Hulberts have spent their 
winters in California for a number 
of years. While there, Mr. Hulbert 
will give a series of talks before the 
Voorhis School for Boys. The 
school was founded by Charles B. 
Voorhis who has given a great deal 
to Colorado College. Professor 
will return to conduct regular class- 
es during the second semester. 



All men and women interested in 
Intercollegiate Debating will have 
an opportunity to study the prin- 
ciples of Debate and to engage in 
the practice during the 1930 sea- 
son. Several very interesting ques- 
tions are to be debated; the Pi 
Kappa Delta question, however, is 
the one that will be used in most 
of the encounters both at home and 
elsewhere. This question reads: 
"Resolved that the Nations of the 
World Abolish all Armaments Ex- 
cept those for Police Purposes." 
Tryooits on this question will be 
held the first week after the Christ- 
mas Holidays. Each student will 
be expected to give a five minute 
constructive speech on either side 
of the question and a three-minute 
rebuttal speech. 

Colorado College debaters and 
the local chapter of Tau Kappa Al- 
pha will be hosts this year to the 
annual Colorado Debate Convention 
in February. About seventy-five 
debaters and coaches will be in at- 



tendance at this three-day meeting. 
Debates will be held morning, 
noon, and night, in all parts of the 
city, before open forums, young 
people's meetings, church congre- 
gations, women's clubs, luncheon 
clubs, etc. Both men and women 
debaters will attend from Colorado 
University, Colorado State Teach- 
ers College, Western State College, 
Denver University, and Colorado 
College. 

Miss Amanda Ellis is coaching 
the women debaters and Mr. Cope- 
land is coaching the men. There 
is a great deal of talent in the Col- 
lege this year and some splendid 
arguments should result. 

Mr. Arthur Baylis, Manager, is 
planning an extensive trip for the 
men. It is hoped that the C. C. 
men may debate as far east as the 
New England States. In other 
years, C. C. debaters have covered 
the Rocky Mountain States, t h e 
Middle West, the Northwest, and 
the South-Central States. 



day night, December 16 and the 
time 7:30 p. m. As usual, it will 
be staged in Perkins Hall. 

This year's Pan-Pan is being 
managed by Kenneth Pomeroy, by 
a vote of the Associated Student 
Council. His assistant has been 
n?med as Barrett Griffith. Both of 
these men are sophomores. 

Magna Pan-Pan is the Colorado 
College "vodevil" s.how. Each fra- 
ternity, each society, and other or- 
ganizations on the campus are 
scheduled to present some kind of a 
.short stunt, for which a prize of $5 
in cash will be presented to the 
winners. Judges have been picked 
for the acts, but their names have 
not yet been made public by t h e 
manager. In the past, competition 
has been stiff for these prizes, and 
according to present gossip, it will 
be even more stiff this year. The 
writer has heard people from sev- 
eral different organizations remark 
that "If our stunt doesn't win the 
prize this year something will be 
wrong." 

Manager Pomeroy will not let out 
the names of the various stunts to 
be put on by respective organiza- 
tions. He says that it is going to 
be bigger and better than ever, and 
those who miss this year's show will 
be sorry about it later. 



Ellis Announces Test 
Results Are Available 



The results of the tests taken by 
the freshmen and new students at 
the opening of school this last 
September are now available to 
those students who wish them. A 
stamped self-addressed envelope 
should be mailed or given to Mr. 
Robert Ellis for this purpose. 

The grades on each test (the 
Detroit Intelligence Test, the High 
School Content Test, the Compre- 
hensive Reading Test, etc.) are not, 
as might first be supposed, on a 
percentage basis. The score of 
each individual on each test is con- 
verted to a sca'e which ranges 
from 50% as the lowest grade, 
through 75% as the grrde of t h e 
average student, to IOO'~r as the 
highest grade. Thus 50% does not 
necessarily mean that the student 
made a grade of 50% on that par- 
ticular test, nor does 100% indi- 
cate a perfect score. 



THE TIGER 



Good Books -- the Best Gift 

July, • 1 4— Emil Ludwig $3.50 

The Tragic Era — Claude G. Bowers 5.00 

Seven Iron Men— Paul de Kruif ___ 3.00 

Peter the Great— Stephen Graham 4.00 

An Autobiography of America — Mark Van Doren 5.00 

Francis Rabelais— Albert Jay Nock and C. R. Wilson.... 5.00 
New Worlds to Conquer — Richard Halliburton 5.00 

We also have Christmas Cards and Gift Novelties 



UJm.jU. 



[DIIH fARN/VDRIHy^ iDoi^y^tior 

20 EAST BIJOU STREET 



FOR PLUMBING AND HEATING WORK 

^•^-^ BUMSTEAD'S ^^f 

''Where Your Dollars Have More Cents" 



GIFT SUGGESTIONS 

FOR MEN 

From the 

Perkins-Shearer Store 

At $1.00 or Under 

Neckwear $1.00 

Handkerchiefs 15c to 1.00 

Silk Socks 75c to 1. 00 

Lisle Hose 35c 3 for 1 .00 

Wool Hose 50c to 1 .00 

Belts 1.00 

Buckles 1.00 

Suspenders ----__-.-] .00 

At $2.00 or Under 

ResilioTies $1.50 to $2.00 

Silk Hose 2.00 

Wool Hose $1.50 to 2.00 

Fancy Suspenders - - - - -$1.50 to 2.00 

Coin Purses $1.50 to 2.00 

Bill Folds 2.00 

At $5 or Under 
Imported Neckwear ----- 2.50 to $5 
Fancy Pajamas ------ 2.50 to 5 

Pigskin Gloves $1.75 to 5 

Buckskin Gloves $3 to 5 

Lined Gloves $2.50 to 5 

Imported Wool Hose - - - - $2.50 to 5 

Golf Hose $2 to 5 

Manhattan Shirts $2 to 5 

Silk Mufflers $2.50 to 5 

PERKINS-SHEARER CO. 



PIKES PEAK IS SCALED 
BY KNODEL AND ROEBKE 



Walter Knodel and Henry Roeb- 
ke, two Colorado College students, 
battled huge drifts all day Saturday 
to climb Pikes Peak. They started 
up the Cog Road at 9:30 A. M. 
and managed to reach the summit 
at 10:30 P. M. The temperature 
registered zero, and when the wind 
changed to the east it grew con- 
siderably colder. They tried to 
make a fire, but the water-soaked 
wood which they found nearby re- 
fused to burn, and while they were 
trying to find dry wood, mountain 
rats plunder their knapsacks. With- 
out food or fire, they wrapped 
themselves m their blankets and de- 
cided to wait until daylight before 
starting back down the mountain. 
The water from their eyes would 
freeze and it caused Knodel a great 
deal of pain before the Roebke 
could come to his aid and remove 
it. Both of them stated that this 
caused them more trouble than the 
climb. 

They started their return trip 
soon after sun-up, and arrived in 
Manitou about noon. Tired? Cer- 
tainly. Hungry? Sure. Sick? Yes, 
both of them have developed colds, 
but the main reason they are happy 
is because such an experience is be- 
hind them. 



Hulbert Writes Story 
In Montana "Frontier" 



Quoting from "The Frontier", 
published by the U. of Montana: 
"Beginning with the Nov. issue, it 
includes Dr. Hulbert of Colorado 
College, a Fellow of the Royal 
Geographic Society of Great Britain 
head of the Stewart Commission on 
Western History, and the author 
of many books — "Historic High- 
ways of America", "The Making of 
the American Republic", "Fron- 
tiers", and several others, and the 
editor of the Crown Collection of 
American Maps which accurately 
maps for the first time, the western 
trails. 



Tigers Will Practice 
Against Kansas Aggies 

Altho the athletic offices at C. 
C. have been flooded with offers 
of games, the only practice games 
scheduled thus far comprise a dou- 
ble-header with Kansas Aggies, to 
be played here January 3 and 4. 
Other games will be booked to sea- 
son the Tigers, during Christmas 
vacation. Herigstad is desirous of 
a barnstorming trip if such can be 
arranged, but plans for one are yet 
J in the mental stage. 



^ 



Here's Youi 

VICTOR 
RECORl 



RADIO 



Come in and hei 
the latest releases _i 
our ventilated trii 






'^li^'^S M/GGrlGSS 

113-H5 N. Tcjon 



THE 



Crissey & Fowler 

LUMBER CO. 

MILL WORK 
BUILDERS' SUPPLIES 



Main 101 
1I7-127W. Vermijo 



CHOCOLATES 

Good as Made 

Box Goods a Specialty 

WALLACE CANDY COMPANY 



Three Makes 
of Fountain 
Pens for Gifts 

— and Pencils 

to match 

With Wahl, Sheaffer 
and Parker Pens and 
Pencils to choose from, 
you can select an ideal 
gift for almost any per- 
son. 

Stop in and see the 
range of choice. 

Christmas Cards from 
Kodak Negatives 

Certainly your own 
Christmas Card when 
made from a picture 
you took — photograph- 
ic reproduction o f 
greeting in your ovra 
writing if you wish. 




17 N. Tejon 



THE TIGER 



Euterpe Presents 
Holiday Program 

The Euterpe Musical Society held 
its Christmas program and party at 
the home of Mrs. Wilham Lennox, 
1001 North Nevada Ave., on Tues- 
day evening, December 10th. 
Thirty-five members and guests en- 
joyed the affair. The Christmas 
spirit was carried in the program 
and refreshments. The following 
program was given: 
Violin: — 

Meditations from Thais 

Massenet 

Rebecca Todd 
Accompanist, Ethel Bley Smith 

...Ethel Bley Smith 

Woman's Quartet: — 
Christmas Carols, 

Helen Huffman, Margaret 
Rhoades, Helen Hummel and 
Florence Baine. 
Accompanist, Esther Steueive 
Reading: — 

The Little Grey Lamb Sullivan 

Audry Nelson 
Piano: — 

Prelude, No. 20 Chopin 

Allegretto Hayden 

Esther Stueive 
Reading: — 
Matilda, 
Tin Gee-gee, 

Audrey Nelson 
Piano: — 

Prelude from Suite pour le Piano 

Debussy 

Ethel Bley Smith 



Official Notices 



A special Christmas Chapel serv- 
ice will be held at the regular morn- 
ing chapel hour on Tuesday, De- 
cember 1 7. Dean Hershey will 
speak. Special music under t h e 
direction of Mrs. Speed Tucker 
will be given. All students and 
members of the faculty are cordial- 
ly invited. 

The Program: 

1. Little Town of Bethlehem 

2. The First Noel 

3. Birthday of the King 



SENIORS ATTENTION 

Candidates for graduation should 
observe the list of candidates for 
graduation in June, 1930, posted in 
Palmer Hall and report any correc- 
tions or additions to Mrs. Morrow 
immediately. 



No. W. A. hike is scheduled for 
Saturday. The next hike will be 
on January 4, the first Saturday 
after vacation. 



Students wishing to hash at the 
Plaza during the Christmas vaca- 
tion please see Glenn Wade. 



Exchanges 

Laramie, Wyo.- — It isn't going to 
be such an easy task to get that girl 
of yours to walk now that the city 
has assumed its usual take-off on 
a table cloth, but we have found a 
solution that should suit her taste 
to perfection. 

The Kinkade Rent-a-Car and 
Taxi Co. has recently installed a 
new taxi and are making a special 
effort at getting the trade of the 
University students. The taxi is 
painted with a dark body and trim- 
med in a light cream color. It is 
a brand new Ford sedan and is 
equiped to shut out all of the cold 
air that is so prevelent in Laramie. 

A sound guarantee stands back 
of this taxi service and it has been 
hinted that the driver might be in- 
duced to wear blinders. 



Greeley, Colo., — Pi Kappa Alpha 
is sponsoring an intra-mural debate 
contest between the different fra- 
ternities on the campus. The award 
silver loving cup. The forensic 
stars are going to attempt to prove 
that there are too many people in 
college 



Denver, Colo., — Change of the 
official football rule concerning 
whether or not a ball passing over 
the goal post is a goal or not, is 
advocated by J. L. Bingham, grad- 
uate manager of athletics for the 
University of Denver. 

The width of the goal posts is 
arbitrary. Some schools use only a 
two inch pipe for posts, while others 
use a six inoh board. For this rea- 
son Bingham believes that a drop 
kick or a place kick should be 
counted a goal only if it passes be- 
tween the goal posts and not over 
one. 



Laramie, Wyoming, — FROSH 
THESE RULES ARE TO BE 
OBEYED FROM NOW ON! No 
smoking on the campus. At the 
command "Button" place right 
hand on button, left hand behind 
back, and bow. No Freshman can 
enter front door of Main. No 
speaking to girls on campus on 
Wednesday. No loafing around 
library entrance. Keep off grass. 
Levi's, army shirts and frosh caps 
are to be worn at all football 
games. Watch for names to lime 
football field. All frosh not out 
for basketball, rub down varsity 
every night. 




Merrv Christmas 

Best Wishes For The New Year 

College INN 

Carter Culley 
Dining Dancing 



WE WISH YOU A 

MERRY CHRISTMAS 

AND A 

HAPPY NEW YEAR 




^ 



PlCGLY#WlCGLY 



r^m^ 



^^^^^gr 



r:iti<tlb 



ALL OVER THE WORLD 

FIVE BUSY STORES IN 

COLORADO SPRINGS 



WAGNER-FULTS STUDIO 

Burns Theatre BIdg. 
Exclusive Photographers for the 

PIKES PEAK NUGGET 



Useful and Beautiful Things for 
Gifts — Individual Greeting Cards 

Especially for student friends or relatives our store 
offers many unusually appropriate things for gifts — the 
newer Fountani Pens, Brief Cases. Stationery with fra- 
ternity emblems, articles of leather. Memory and Ko- 
dak books. Diaries, Drafting Instruments, etc. 

And when you want Greeting Cards for some def- 
inite individual in design particularly appropriate you 
can choose from hundreds of designs. 



WRAPPINGS and boxes for 
gifts, tinsel cords, seals, 
tags and decorative materials 
enable you to dress up gift 
packages in many attractive 
ways. 



Printing fi- 
SiAnoNEJorCa 

Colorado Surings Cola 



I 



THE TIGER 



Member of Rocky Mountain 
Inter-Colleeriate Press 



The Colorado College 

Newspaper, 

Published Weekly by the 

Students. 



THE TIGER 

Artlclea intended for publication should be left in the Tiger Box, on the first 
floor of Cobum library, by Wednesday noon. No unsigned contributions will be 
published. 



LLOYD H. ELLIS Main 1975 Editor 

James Keyser Associate Editor Barratt O'Hara Desk Editor 

Ghauncey H. Blodgett, Jr -..Sport Editor Margaret Gillen Society Editor 

Mark Perkinson Feature Editor John W. Haussermann, Jr Lit. Editor 



JAMES PATTERSON Main 2575 Manager 

Frank Dentan, Jr Advertising Manager 

Merritt Ritter Circulation Manager 



Literary 



PRESS CONFERENCE. 

Editors and representatives of ten colleges in Utah, Wyoming, and 
Colorado met to discuss their problems, policies, the writing of news, and 
the future of college journalism at the Rocky Mountain Intercollegiate 
Press Association in Denver last week. Ideas were exchanged regard- 
ing editorial policies. Staff members met fellow journalists from other 
conference papers, and questioned each other concerning stands they 
took on issues. 

A great deal of value was received in those two days of the con- 
ference. All the delegates had certain ideas concerning their papers be- 
fore they went to Denver; perhaps, they still have those same ideas. 
But the greatest value they could have received from that interchange 
of remarks was not a change of viewpoint, but the benefit of hearing 
the other person's point of view. 

The value of the meeting was not confined to getting ideas con- 
cerning journalism. There was something in that meeting that two 
schools do not receive when they meet for an athletic contest or a de- 
bate conference; perhaps, that is where the difference lies; in one, 
there is a contest and conflict, in the other, there is an association. It 
is well known that every year one makes friends with people whom he 
dislikes on their first meeting. Often, in fact, the best friends are those 
who disliked each other intensely the first time they met. But when 
those two people are thrown together time and again, and get to know 
each other, become friends, and steadfast ones. The same is the case 
between colleges and universities. When a freshman enters a college, 
he often hears much of the rival colleges — he learns of what a poor 
spirit the rivals have; what terrible students they have. If that stu- 
dent doesn't ever visit rival colleges, he will always keep his first im- 
pression of them. Knowledge of the spirit of the rival colleges, friend- 
ship between students of the schools, might cause a reversal of those 
first ideas. The conference in Denver had much to do with fostering a 
kindly spirit between Denver and the other colleges of the conference. 
Delegates stayed in fraternity and sorority houses, and a real hospitahty 
was tendered to them. At the round table discussions, questions of in- 
tercollegiate spirit were brought up and difficulties were ironed out. 
The delegates sat with their rivals at the D. U. stadium, and felt how 
the college spirit of D. U. was reflected. They found the Denver stu- 
dents to be like their own students. All in all there was a much friend- 
lier attitude toward Denver University and the other rival schools on 
Saturday evening, than there was before the conference. 



RETURNING HOME. 

Freshmen of Colorado College will return to their homes next week 
for their first long vacation of their college careers. Without a doubt, 
they will return to their homes different persons from the high school 
seniors who left for Colorado College in September. The home town 
people will be looking for new and different persons when these college 
students come home. They will be waiting to see just what college did 
to Johnny or Jimmy. Has it made him collegiate? Or will he be seri- 
ous? Has he learned some new line? Or has he taken on polish? 

Students Sihould remember when they return to their homes that 
they symbolize at least to a degree, Colorado College. Parents will 
look the students over, and question the possibility whether or not they 
should send their sons or daughters to Colorado College next year. 

Don't forget that Colorado College is a real school in every sense of 
the word; that it has an excellent faculty, a credtiable student body, 
good prospects for a winning football team next year, and the best pros- 
pects of any team in the conference for a winning basketball team. And 
last of all, don't forget that the other schools in the state are good, but 
that Colorado College is better. 



By Thelma Lee Dorroh 
As the doctor urged his horse 
along the dark, storm-driven 
country road the snow fell heavily 
and silently. He had almost reach- 
cause he remembered that bridge. 
Been over it often enough. But this 
was the last trip he was afraid. 
Too bad, and on Christmas Eve. 
The women had never had a chance 
though. No stamina. And she 
wouldn't help him fight. Then this 
last thing of getting out of bed and 
wondering out of the house in her 
delirium would be too much for her 
to withstand. Over the phone he 
had understood that she was rav- 
ing something about trying to find 
Santa . Claus. Insisting that the 
children wouldn't have any Christ- 
mas unless she found him. Some- 
thing tragic-comic in a grey drab of 
a farm women wandering out into a 
snow storm to find Santa Claus. 
The doctor shivered and pulled his 
old fur coat closer about him. God 
it was cold! 

Somewhere near him a dog be- 
gan barking, but broke off ab- 
ruptly when the doctor spoke to 
him. And then a blur of light be- 
came visible resolving itself almost 
immediately into a lantern which 
the woman's husband had snatched 
up when he heard the dog's alarm. 



The man, a big, stolid, awkward 
creature held the horse while the 
doctor clambered down, but he 
broke into sobbing when asked how 
his wife was. The doctor sighed 
Even after twenty years of practic- 
ing medicine it was hard to face 
death. 

He hurried into the house and 
without waiting to take off his 
wraps or to shake off the snow, he 
entered the tiny stuffy room, filled 
with too many children and neigh- 
bor women and little else except the 
rickety brass bed upon which the 
woman lay, dying. The stir caused 
by the doctor's arrival aroused hei 
from the coma into which she had 
fallen and her eyes blazed up intc 
his from the chalky mask which was 
her face. As he bent over her this 
rigid mask broke and an incredible 
almost childish ecstasy took its 
place. 

A bony claw of a hand reachec 
out and snatched his fur- clac 
figure, still powdered with snow anc 
she faltered weakly. 

"Hello, Santa Claus." 

Someone in the room titterec 
hysterically and someone else gav( 
a vigorous shush as the doctor low 
ered her gently upon her pillov 
and folded her hands. 



Problems of enforcement of rush- 
ing rules is the obstacle that is block 
ing the passage of deferred pledging 
by the Interfraternity Council. The 
measure has been shelved temporar- 
ily, pending an investigation of fac- 
ulty and fraternity opinion. 

While it is believed that the ma- 
jority of fraternities favor the de- 
ferred plan for a five-day period, 
fear of sub rosa pledging is hold- 
ing up a definite decision. An at- 
tempt is being made to enlist faculty 
aid for the enforcement of the plan, 
should it be adopted. 

Whether this administrative move 
would become a realty is doubtful, 
because of the "hands off" policy 
of the administration regarding 
fraternity affairs. 

— D. U. Clarion 



Palo Alto, Calif.— "Hell Week," 
will soon be abolished by the fra- 
ternities of Stanford University, 
due to recent action by the Inter- 
fraternity Council. A resolution 
was adopted unanimously, con- 
demning this old custom, although 
action as yet is left only to the 
house presidents. — Silver and Gold. 



As a result of concerted action oi 
the part of the administration an( 
fraternities and sororities of Teach 
ers College, pay telephones will b( 
discontinued in the Greek chapte 
houses in Greeley. 

Much dissatisfaction with thi 
new arrangement resulted when thi 
plan was adopted this fall. Thi 
fraternities and sororities negotiate< 
with the telephone company for i 
better plan. The company agreec 
to remove the telephones provide< 
the administration would make thi 
college phone located at the wes 
entrance of the Administratioi 
Building operate or the pay plan. 

Similar agitation over pay tele 
phones was started in Ft. Callin 
recently by Agricultural College fra 
ternities and sororities. Pay phone 
were installed in all the Greel 
houses there, but later the cit} 
council ruled the Telephone Com 
pany should hold to its franchis( 
and permit the organization to pa] 
the regular flat rate. — ^Teacher 
College Mirrow. 



THE TIGER 



Broken Lenses Duplicated 

Save the Pieces 

Eyes examined Lenses Ground 




THZ LAUTERMAN-DUGAN 

JEWELRY AND OPTICAL CO. 

Jewelers, Optometrists and 

Mfg. Opticians 

Fi le Watch, Clock and Jewelry 

Repairing 
121 N. Tejon St. Phone Main 674 



HOLLY SUGAR 



the Best 

the essential food. 



HOLLY SUGAR 
CORPORATION 



SOCIETY 



We Make a Specialty of 

CLEANING AND DYEING MEN'S 

AND WOMEN'S SHOES 

GOLDEN CYCLE SHINE PARLOR 

Todd Colbert 

Lobby Golden Cycle Bldg. 
Tejon and Pikes Peak 

Strachan's 
S\veet 
Shop 

Bijou and Nevada 

Try our Malts and Toasted 

Sandwiches 



Under New Management 

The College^ 
Barber Shop 

Ralph Schildknecht, Proprietor 

103 E. Cache laPoudre 
Colorado Springs 



Quality 

Cleaners and Dyers 

SUITS, O'COATS 

HATS $1.25 

U Fone 1-8-1-1 We'U Call 

H. A. Thompson 
10 E. Kiowa 



Minerva Dance 

Announcement of the engage- 
ment of Elizabeth Joy Smith to 
William Fales was made at the din- 
ner dance given by Minerva soci- 
ety, Friday evening, December 6, 
at the club house. Miss Smith is 
a member of Minerva and will be 
graduated in June. Mr. Fales is a 
Beta Theta Pi and a member of 
the class of 1932. Guests at the 
party included Stewart Wilson, 
Ward Lester, William Fales, John 
Cogan, Roland Anderson, George 
Robinson, Harold Weaver, William 
Vorrieter, Marks Jaillette, Harry 
Matheson, Jerry Cogan, Gilbert 
.Ice, Williem Haney, Charles Co- 
^an, Bruce Gray, Winthrop Crouch, 
Carter Hutchinson, Paul Crozier, 
Euugene Weinberger, Walter Fors- 
lund, and Lawson Sumner. Miss 
Catherine Hood and Miss Virginia 
Irwln, alumnae of the society, were 
he chaperons. 

The social calendar for the week- 
end includes several Christmas par- 
ties. The Phi Delta Thetas, t h e 
Kappa Sigmas, and the Phi Gamma 
Deltas are entertaining at the chap- 
ter houses this evening, and the Pi 
Kappa Alphas and Contemporary 
society will have parties tomorrow 
evening. The Beta Theta Pi formal 
will be held Tuesday evening. 

Dr. and Mrs. Archer B. Hulbert 
and daughter, Joan, are leaving to- 
day for Claremont, Calif, where 
they will spend the holidays. 

Alice Gillett is now living in 
Bemis Hall. 

Zetalethian Initiation 

Zetalethian society initiated four 
members, Friday afternoon, Decem- 
ber 6. The new members of the 
organization are Mary Strachan, 
Alice Gillett, Elizabeth Sweetman, 
and Helen Hultman. Formal initi- 
r.tion was followed by a dinner for 
the society at the home of Frances 
Glau, president. 

Coffee Hour 

Music for the coffee hour at 
Bemis Hall, last Sunday, was fur- 
nished by Miss Grace Fitzgerald, 
soprano, and Miss Daisy Ann 
Thompson, pianist. 

Society Tea 

All Colorado College women are 
invited to attend a lea to be held 
in Bemis Hall, this afternoon, from 
four o'clock until si.\. The affair 
is the second of a series of teas 
being sponsored by the girls' so 
cieties. The members of Hypatia 
will be hostesses today, and Mrs. 
William F. Nelson will speak. 



Hypatia society entertained at a 
dinner dance at the Broadmoor ho- 
tel, Saturday, December 7. Mr. 
and Mrs. W. Lewis Abbott chap- 
eroned the affair. The guests were 
Charles Irwin, Harold Sarkisian, 
Ed Burno, Darwin Coit, Harold 
Harmon, Charles Wilgus, Burton 
Paddock, Dean Triggs, Harry 
Wood, Glen Wade, Arthur Bishop, 
Harold Ingraham, Bill Twilley, Ar- 
thur G. Sharp, Jr., Harry Blunt, 
George Anderson, Elton Slate, Bill 
Walters. 



Zetalethian Party 

The Zetalethian Christmas party 
was held at the club house, Satur- 
day evening, December 7. Guests 
of the society included Virginia 
Raywood, Jeanette Case, Marian 
McCleary, George Robinson, James 
Keyser Loren Chaney, Stewart Wil- 
son, Edward Peck, Harold Akin, 
Juan Reid, John Coward, Roland 
Anderson, Paul Conover, Lawson 
Sumner, James Thompson, and 
Harry West. The chaperons were 
Mrs. Louise W. Fauteaux, Dr. and 
Mrs. Paul Roberts, and Mr. and 
Mrs. A. C. Morrell. 



Phi Gam Dance 

The Phi Gamma Delta Christmas 
dance will be held this evening. 
Among the guests who will be pres- 
ent are Doris Simmons, Sally Shel- 
don, Genevieve Engel, Dorothy 
F a u s, Louise Hilswick, Martha 
Murray, Margaret McClelland, Mar- 
ian Weinberger, Virginia Dewey, 
Betty Hanford, Melba Adams, An- 
nabelle Drummond, Betty Pitts, 
Harriet Floyd, Adda Smith, Su- 
zanne Walker, Jean Horan, Agnes 
Welch, Jean Crago and Eleanor 
McCleary. The chaperons will be 
Dr. and Mrs. Bortree, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Evans, Mrs. Griffith and 
Mrs. Metzler. 



Senior women of Colorado Col- 
lege will repeat their long standing 
custom of carol singing Sunday 
night. Plans were developed Tues- 
day at a dinner given by Dean 
Fauteaux and the Dean. The group 
will start at ten and will go to the 
various fraternity houses, halls and 
the president's home. Alice Abby, 
president of the Dais, is in charge. 

Thursday evening the annual 
Christmas dinner given by the hall 
girls was held at Bemis. Freshman 
town girls were the guests. The 
Glee Club sang carols between 
courses and Miss Rebecca Todd 
played a violin solo. After dinner 
Dean Fauteaux read "The Christ- 
mas Story" to the girls. 



Kappa Sigma Dance 

Celebrating the last dance before 
the holidays, Kappa Sigma vvill 
hold its annual Christmas party at 
the chapter house tonight. The 
house is being uniquely decorated 
in appropriate Yuletide spirit, and 
one of the best parties of the year 
IS rnticipated. Refreshments will 
be served during the evening. The 
chaperons are Mr. and Mrs. Mc- 
Murtry, Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Cope- 
land; the music will be furnished 
by Coits. 

Guests at the function are Marie 
Benning, Elizabeth Skidmore, Vio- 
la Buckley, Leslie Katherine Ma- 
gruder, Doris Butler, Virginia Pat- 
terson, Sally Tompkins, Ruth Gor- 
don, Jane Whitecraft, Marian Mc- 
Millian, Grrxe Perkins, Phyllis 
Ormsby, Dorothy McCrary, Mary 
McConnell, Serena Williamson, 
Virginia Raywood, Virginia Easton, 
Violet Bevan, Katherine Herbert, 
Helen Hummel, Marion Gretzinger, 
Marjorie Southmayd, Alberta Jones, 
Mary Jo Lawley, Marie Frey, Lois 
Seebach, Charlotte Pipkin, Mar- 
garet Bradfield, Evelyn Stubble- 
field, Marian Fee, Genevieve Curry, 
Dorothy Chamberlian, Matilda Wil- 
lis, Marybelle Evans, Dorothy Osin- 
cup, Frances Bruton. 



Miami Triad Meeting 

Last Sunday members of Beta 
Theta Pi and Phi Delta Theta were 
guests of the Sigma Chi's at the an- 
nual Miami Triad smoker. During 
the evening stunts were put on by 
each of the pledge groups, boxing 
matches were held, and several hyp- 
notistic stunts performed. 

Later in the evening the groups 
gathered around the piano and sang 
their songs, and then went to the 
Halls where they gave a Serenade. 

BARBERS' DANCE 



A Barber's Ball for the benefit 
of the Colorado College Endow- 
ment Fund will be given on Thurs- 
day evening, December 19, at the 
City Auditorium. From 8 until 9 
o'clock, an entertainment will be 
given, and then dancing will take 
the center of the stage. All the 
proceeds of the dance will go to the 
endowment fund, and the Barbers' 
Union is paying for half of the e.\- 
penses of the orchestra. The Bar- 
bers' Union Orchestra will furnish 
the music. 



Mrs. Louise Fauteaux will en- 
tertain the cast and helpers of Eager 
Heart after the performance Sunday 
night. 



THE TIGER 



Knorr's Market 

FOR YOUR PARTIES OR PICNICS 



Let us supply you with 
good thhigs to eat 



123 North Tejon 



Phone 2602 



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ELECTROL OIL BURNERS 
Plumbing Heating 



312 
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Phone 
Main 
1674 



5 N. Tejon 



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2 SHOPS 



Quality Lunch 



TRY OUR HAMBURGERS AND CHILI 
Orders over $1.00 delivered free. 



M. 1784 



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Get an estimate on your next job 

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PLUMBING ©'HEATING COMPANY 



226 N. Tejon St. 



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and Ready to Use 

SHEETS 7 cents 

BATH TOWELS 2 cents 

NAPKINS 1 cent 

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PHONE MAIN 82 

LAUNDRY and 
DRY CLEANING 




CHRISTMAS RELIEVES 
ENGTANGLING ALLIANCES 



By Mark Perkinson 

Christmas! Once again the joy- 
ous Yuletide is upon us. That pre- 
cious event which enables us to get 
rid of all little happy last minutes 
suggestions which were wished on 
us last year. Christmas is the life- 
saver of many an attic which is 
groaning beneath its load of keep- 
sakes and remembrances. 

The holiday spirit also gives us a 
pretense in which we may cloak 
any guilt we may feel through our 
negligence in not keeping up t h e 
correspondence to a friend, for 
what will smear things over better 
than a nice greeting card, or if the 
offense is too flagrant, perhaps just 
a wee little gift. 

Its a great old season for its so- 
cial events, too. Think of all the 
magnificent parties and dances 
which might be let slip were it not 
for the incentive of the vacations 
that Christmas brings. You know 
it's like a sugar coated pill, it leaves 
a good taste in the mouth, so when 
you get home you can tell all the 
prospective freshmen and initiates 
what a great institution the college 
really is. The sugar coating of so- 
cial successes in this case is doing 
away with the bitterness of mid- 
semester grades. 

That brings up another thing. 
Christmas is a wonderful time to get 
in the good graces of the family, if 
you're careful in your choices. It 
is really a wonderful time to soften 
those harsh memories of that fail- 
uure in Phil 4 or the amount of 
that last check. • 

For you who have a problem in 
love allow me to remind you that 
there is no time like the holiday 
season to either make or break re- 
lations. You can make yourself 
eternally endeared by a slight bit of 
critical selection. A litde careful 
study of the problem and you need 
have no further worries for you can 
start selecting the furniture. On 
the other hand no time is as con- 
venient nor as cheap as this season 
to escape from entangling alliances. 
My advice here is to give a nice gift 
and enclose with it a notice of sev- 
ered relations. This leaves a good 
impression, avoids painful scenes, 
and causes a nice memory. 

Another thing that Christmas 
brings is that sense of turning over 
a new leaf. Again we stand on 
the bring of a new year. We look 
forward to the things that it will 
bring and firmly make up our 
minds that we \vill strive to give all 
that is in us. We'll even study. Of 
course these good resolutions all 
pass away or fade mto nonexistence 
with the passing of the season. 



Photographs of our Colorado 
mountains. Nicely made — 
attractively colored by hand. 
Moderate in price — framed 
or unframed. 

H. L. STANDLEY 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs 



You may save with this Associa 
tion, any amount from one dollai 
up per week or month. 

We invite college students to cal 
at our office (Ground floor loca 
tion) 116 North Tejon Street, Cole 
rado Springs. 

E. C. SHARER. President 
1 1 6 North Tejon Street 




If looking for bargains 
in watohes, rings, or gift 
jewelry, call at 

W. S. CHARLES 

Jewelry Store 
101/2 E. Pikes Peak 



ISAAC BROTHERS 

WATCHMAKERS and JEWELERS 

32 East Bijou Street 



PAUDRE-PAUFFE 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Permanent Finger and Water 

Waving 

Manicure and Scalp Treatments. 

Marcels 50c. 



for hot, clean 
clinkerless fuel 
—call the "coal phone' 

M 577 




COAL/ 



THE TIGER 



COVERS 
ALL THE FIELD 



SPORTS 



FOOTBALL 
CROSS COUNTRY EQUITATION 



HUGHES' 
CHOCOLATES 

Try our Saturday 
SPECIALS 



Greater than "Old Arizona' 

An Epic 

STARTS SUNDAY 

December 8th 



CADILLAC 

and 

CHRYSLER 

MOTORCARS 

Adams Motor Co. 

Marksheffel Building 



Go To 

Miller Music Cp. 

"Where Music Is Sweetest" 
13 North Tejon Street 
for Records and Music 

GEORGE L. MILLER, Prop. 



Hey-Service 

The 
HEYSE SHEET 
METAL WORKS 

INC. 

219 N.Weber 
Main 552 



W. I. Lucas 

HAS 

EVERYTHING IN 

SPORTING GOODS 
"Tigers always welcome" 

119 N. Tejon St. 
Main 900 



Veterans Start 

Hoop Practice 

Fresh from three pre-season vic- 
tories over local teams, and with 
three veterans. Earl H. "Dutch" 
Clark, Juan Reid, and Harold 
"Inky" Ingraham, returning to the 
hardwood floor after a lay-off from 
the strenuous football grind, the 
Tigers started practice for the hoop 
season in earnest Monday night, 22 
men reporting to Coach Oscar 
Herigstad for workouts. A prelim- 
inary but heavy workout was given 
them. 

Last Friday night, the Tigers 
won their third victory over the Y. 
M. C. A. leader's team by the 
score of 36-10. The game, which 
was played at Cossitt hall, was a 
slow and uninteresting one. But it 
was marked by the stellar floor 
work and shooting of Ernie Waters, 
diminutive forward of last year's 
five. 

Bill Hinkley, last year's guard, 
has not yet reported for practice, 
because of a bad charley-ihorse re- 
ceived in the Boulder football 
g£,me, but his appearance for prac- 
tice is expected next week. In the 
free of stiff competition, and be- 
cause of his late appearence. Bill 
will probably be handicapped in 
making the team at first, but his in- 
jury will propably come around in 
order that he will be able to play 
h.ter in the season. 

Including the veterans, chief 
among the contenders for varsity 
positions are Doyle, last year's sub- 
stitute, Chaney, Steller Kansas hoop 
star. Fries, of Brush, Colo., Dial, 
star of the 1929 Terror five. Van 
Dyke, a Pueblo product, Slocum, 
last year's intramural star, Ryer- 
son, all-state guard from South 
Denver, Butler, Smith, Warning, 
Ryan, and Guy Martin. 

An important pre-season game 
will be played in Pueblo Saturday 
night against the fast Santa Fe 
quintet, led by "Fifty" Ryan, for- 
mer Tiger star. The Santa Fe five 
is one of the fastest in the independ- 
ent league of the Smelter City and 
will afford some real competition 
for the Bengals. The game is being 
played at the Park Hill gymnasium 
in Pueblo in order that fans may see 
their idol, the "Flying Dutchman 
shoot a few baskets before he leaves 
next week for the coast to play in 
the annual East-West grid classic on 
New Year's day. 



ALL-CONFERENCE SELECTION 



One man's guess is as good as 
another in this business of picking 
an all conference team, and with 
this statement to back us up, the 
sports department of the Tiger will 
venture into the unknown and 
choose two teams that seem to 
them of 'all-conference' timber. 

First Team 
Ends — Watkins, Utah; and Ket- 

chum, Denveh, 
Tackles 4^ L. Starbuck, C. C; 

Brotzman, Denver. 
Guards — Buster, C. U.; Graves, 

Aggies. 
Center — Jonas, Utah. 
Quarterback — Clark, C. C. 
Halves — Summerhays, Utah, Reg- 
an, C. U. 
Fullback — Pomeroy, Utah. 

Second Team 
Ends — Loucks, C. U.; Beattie, Ag- 
gies. 
Tackles — Simpkins, Utah; Elliot, 

C. U. 
Guards — Olson, Utah; McGrory, 

C. C. 
Center — Brownlee, Denver. 
Quarter — Call, Utah Aggies. 
Halves — Carr, Mines; Price, Utah. 
Fullback— Bill Smith, C. U. 

This choice is meant to have 
been influenced by steady play all 
season, rather than bursts of bril- 
liant performance such as some of 
the conference players have been 
wont to come out with spasmodic- 
ally all season. 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 



Next year Colorado College will 
play five games at home and three 
away from home, according to the 
football schedule decided upon by 
the Rocky Mountain Faculty Ath- 
letic Conference, which met in Den- 
ver on the 6th and 7th of Decem- 
ber. The games scheduled for 
Colorado College are as follows: 

Oct. 4 — Utah State Aggies at 
Colorado Springs. 

Oct. II— Western State at Colo- 
rado Springs. 

Oct. 18 — Denver University at 
Denver. 

Oct. 25— Open. 

Nov. I — Colorado University at 
Colorado Springs. 

Nov. 8— Utah University at Salt 
Lake. 

Nov. 15 — Colorado Teachers at 
Colorado Springs. 

Nov. 27 — Mines at Colorado 
Springs. 

Prof. R. J. Gilmore is the repre- 
sentative for Colorado College in 
the Rocky Mountain Faculty Ath- 
letic Conference. 



j Frank Geddy Says— 

"Just Merry Christmas! 
but full of cheer, for every 
day of a Happy New Year." 

The Shoe Shop 

Across from the High School 
♦ 




OS- 

SERVICE 



GARAGE TIRE SERVICE 

CORDUROY CORDS 

Sidewall Protection 



GREETING CARDS 

GOWDY 

214 N. Tejon St. 



'Better Equipped Than Ever 
To Handle College Trade." 



CAMPBELL'S 

BARBER SHOP 



East Pikes Peak Avenue 




S ervices f o r your 
car that includes 

Proper Lubrication 

100% Alemite 

LEADING MOTOR OILS 

Weaverized Washing 

Tire Repairing Road Service 

Drive in Today 



FIRESTONE TIRES 
117 N. Nevada Phone M. 202 



10 



THE TIGER 



T. J. Collier T. M. Collier 

V. L. Collier 

TheCOLUER 

LUMBER CO. 

Phone Main 386 
543 W. Colorado Ave. 



Patronize Tiger Advertiser 



FRANK SARLAS & CO. 

Shoe Shining and Repairing 

Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Quick Service 

132 £. Pikes Peak 



The Trip that Bankrupts the 
English Language 

CORLEY 

Mt. Highway 

Cripple Creek in high gear 



LOOK YOURBEST 

Have your hair cut in the 
approved manner. 

Pete's Barber Shop 

8 E. Cucharras St. 



You will Look and Feel Better 
after seeing us. 

Elk Barber Shop 

122 East Pikes Peak 



WHY NOT 

Learn Typewriting 
while attending Col- 
lege? Your teachers 
will appreciate type- 
written work to be 
checked. We can ar- 
range hours to suit 
your convenience. 



•t) 



"^ 



^Imt-i 







Penland to Climb 
Peak With A daman 



Skyrockets shooting through mid- 
night blackness from the top of 
Pikes Peak the night of December 
31 will blaze New Year greetings to 
the world and announce that mem- 
bers of the Adaman Club have 
again made the perilous winter as- 
cent to the summit of the age old 
peak. 

One new member is added to this 
club each year, and he must take 
the climb to qualify for member- 
ship. C. W. Penland, associate 
professor of biology at Colorado 
College, was the novice scaler last 
year, he having been selected as the 
member for 1929. It is the duty of 
the new man to touch off most of 
the giant rockets and there is plen- 
ty of thrill attached to the first two 
or three since there is a terrific 
roar and shower of sparks as each 
one soars skyward. Also occasion- 
ally a rocket is apt to explode in 
the trough and then things do get 
exciting. Very expensive bombs 
and imported flares are used. 

Last year an enormous and extra 
powerful flare was used to com- 
memorate the famous Ronald 
Amundsen — honorary member of 
the club. In spite of the darkness 
and storm this flare made the sum- 
mit of the Peak as bright as day 
and photographs were secured with 
its help. 



HAYDEN SELLS TREES 



Christmas trees are indispensable 
to a real Yuletide, and with this in 
mind Fat Hayden has taken over 
an agency to supply each and all 
with some of the finest evergreen 
ever placed on the market. 

Hayden has already stocked a 
very large and selective set of 
trees, which range through all 
sizes with varying prices although 
he assures us that even the most 
magnificent tree is extremely reas- 
onable. He will have these for sale 
from now until Christmas, and will 
be continually keeping a full and 
complete stock so that in purchas- 
ing one may be sure of a wide 
range of choice. 



COPELAND RETURNS 



William D. Copeland returned 
this week from the first meeting of 
the Casper Speaker's College at 
which he gave the address. Mr. 
Copeland is the supervisor of this 
club which is composed of a group 
of professional men and women in- 
terested in public speaking and 
parliamentary procedure. He is go- 
ing to start a similar club in Albu- 
querque soon after the first of the 
year. 



CANDLELIGHT CEREMONY 
WILL BE HELD SUNDAY 

By Margery Barkley 

The annual Candelight service of 
the Colorado Springs Music Club 
will be held in Perkins Hall at 5 
o'clock Sunday, December 15th. 
Miss Verda McCleary will direct 
the service this year. Perkins Hall 
will be beautifully decorated for the 
occasion. A program of familiar 
old Christmas carols has been ar- 
ranged. The service is the gift of 
the Music club to the community 
and the public is invited to attend. 
About sixty members are in th e 
chorus, which will be assisted by 
Miss Ruth Montgomery, soloist; 
Mrs. Harold Hildreth, Mrs. Daniel 
Thatcher, Mrs. Howard Freeman 
and Miss Margery Hodgkinson, vio- 
linists; and Mrs. Geo. Hemus, or- 
ganist. 

The Program 
Organ Prelude — "Paraphrase on 

a Christmas Hymn" . 

Wm. Faulkers 

Processional — "0 Little Town of 

Bethlehem" Redner 

I 

"Lo, How a Rose" Praetorius 

"The Legend" Tschaikowsky 

"Merry Yuletide"..Rimsky-Karakow 
Violin Quartet — 

"Pavane and Choral" 

_ Paul Wachs 

"Good King Wencelas" — (Tradi- 
tional) 

"0 Bienheureuse Nuit" — Norman- 
dic carol 

"Cradle Hymn" Spilman 

"Joy to the World" Handel 

Soprano — 

"No Candle Was There" 

Liza Lehmann 

"Cantique de Noel" Adam 

III 

"The Holly and the Ivy" 

- Boughton 

"God Rest You, Merry Gentle- 
men" arr. Lefebvre 

"The Three Kings" Hopkins 

Wassail — (arr. Vaughan Williams) 

Recessional — 

"Angels From the Realms of 
Glory" Smart 

Organ Postlude — "Tollite Hosias" 
(Final chorus from The Ora- 
torio of Noel) Saint-Saens 



INSIGNIA DAY 



Insignia Day, marking the first 
appearance of the seniors in their 
caps and gowns, will be Thursday, 
January 9. The ceremony of the 
day will take place at Perkins Hall 
during the assembly hour. 

Members of the class of 1930 are 
to march down the isle, escorted by 
juniors. After they have been 
seated, the juniors will shower 
them with carnations. 



EAT 'EM UP TIGERS 

Then come down and eat 
that tasty 
Confection 

AL'S FRENCH 
FRIED POPCORN 

114 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 



CxOuture's 

French Cleaning and Dyeing Co. 

Phones 1288-1289 
218 N. Tejon St. Colorado Spring 



PLAZA 

DINING 
ROOM 

"The Place to Eat" 

Breakfast Luncheon 

Dinner 



%OMim 




TENT £^ AWNING CO 



Awnings and Camp Supplies 



PLAZA HOTEL BEAUTY SHOP 
Finger wave — Marcels 

Permanent Waves 

Phone Main 2515 



When you consider that you 
can purchase any make type- 
writer on monthly payments 
as small as $5.00 it is not a 
question of affording it 

The essential question is if 
jrou can afford to be without 




125 N. Tejon 



x^ 



Ike 
Typewriter 



Main 95 



THE TIGER 



11 



CHARIOT RACE 



Denver, Colo. The Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon pledges will clash here with 
the pledges from Beta Theta Pi in 
the sixth annual classic of the cam- 
pus. This consists of a chariot race 
after the manner of Ben Hur and 
Messala. 



CLARION ALL STATE TEAM 



The Denver Clarion, in picking 
an All-State team, give positions to 
only two Tigers. Captain "Dutch" 
Clark is chosen to pilot the team 
from the position of quarterback on 
the first team. Starbuck is given 
the tackle position on the third 
team. 

In selecting Clark, t h e Clarion 
writes, "Dutch Clark is without 
doubt the greatest back in R. M. 
C. history. He is a coach on the 
field — a magician with the ball — 
making it do anything that can be 
done with educated hands and 
toes." 



DUTCH 



(Hammond) for new driver- 
less cars. 

New Fords 7c per mile; 
30c per hour. 

New Cheve Six's 8c per mile; 
35c per hour. 

Office 

ELK HOTEL 

Phones M. 346 and 2065 
Free Delivery 



pinions 



/- Pure Milk 



Chapel Interior 
To Be Beautiful 



According to the interior plans 
drawn up by the Architect for the 
Shove Memorial Chapel, the inside 
of the building will be as beautiful 
as the exterior. Other distinctive 
features of this building will be a 
system of indirect controlled light- 
ing for the interior with an arrange- 
ment for control from the organ 
manual. Expert engineers are at 
present working with the Architect 
on the details of this system. 

Broadcasting units will also be in- 
stalled as an integral part of the 
structure, the microphones being 
concealed in the decorative portions 
of the furnishings. 

It is probable that the present 
memorial organ in Perkins Hall will 
be rebuilt and enlarged in the new 
Chapel to make it a first class mod- 
ern instrument. 

It is planned to install the major 
portion of the stained glass wind- 
ows, a certain number of whicn are 
suitably located and will be reserved 
for individual memorials, and the 
balance will be installed as part of 
the building appropriation s o that 
the building shall have a finished 
appearance at the start. A noted 
artist will be commissioned to design 
a series of windows forming a com- 
plete Bibical history, each window 
co-related to the whole and in har- 
mony with each other. 

All floors and stairways of the 
building will be of re-inforced con- 
crete and a system of mechanical 
ventilation will be installed. 



President Mierow Back 
From Chicago Meeting 



President C. C. Mierow returned 
from Chicago alumni meeting last 
Tuesday. A meeting of the Chica- 
go alumni was held on December 
3, and plans were drawn up f o r 
furthering the Colorado College En- 
dowment drive among the alumi. 
Forty-three members attended t h e 
meeting, and they were very en- 
thusiastic concerning the campaign. 
E. C. van Diest and E. B. Bissell 
accompanied President Mierow on 
the trip. 



Several students are intending to 
visit California during the holidays, 
climaxing their stay by attending 
the all-star East-West gridiron 
game, featuring "Dutch" Clark, in 
San Francisco on New Year's day. 
Among them are Jo Hildrich, Clark 
Butterfield, and Barratt O'Hara. 



SUPERIOR 

Dry Cleaning Co. 

Telephone 1364 129 N. Tejon 



Satin Pajamas 
For Christmas Gifts 

Two-piece ones in black, maize, green and 
flesh, hand-embroidered with dainty flowers, 
all edges finished with contrasting colors. 
Crepe-de-chine pajamas in peach, orchid, nile, 
maize and eggshell. Hemstitched and hand- 
embroidered in colors. Satin at $16.75; others 
at $8, $11.50 and $13.50. 

Second Floor 



T.C.KlRKWOOD^i 



Always^ Have A Car/ 



iMLSE^OjEiri 



No matter how far you are from home, you can spend the hoh- ^>. 
days with the folks. Get five or more of V""^ '•"^^V^^'^l.l'^^fj; ^"** V 
drive home for the holidays in a new SAUNDERS SYSTEM car. v >V 
You can all go for less than railroad fare. You can have comfort, 



convenience, and complete independence, 
long trip rates and complete estimates. 



Ask us about our low. 



D. C. Hutchings, Mgr. 
Phone Main 1800 



21 No. Cascade Ave. 
Fords — Desotos — Chryslers 




12 



THE TIGER 



REVIEW OF SEASON EXTOLLS COLORADO TIGERS 1929 GRIDIRON TEAM 



p. M-;^r t^ # ; g '^ 



-Anderson (Trainer), Matheson, L. Starbuck, Reid, Pomeroy, Triggs, Nowels, Lackey (mgr.) 
— Pickhard (coach), Hayden, Southard, Irwin, Hinkley, Clark, Jones, Hartman, Martin, Campbell. 



Third row — Herigstad (coach), E. Starbuck, Heter, Weaver, Rea, Ingraha m. Warning, Cogan, McGrory 
Van dc Graaff (coach). 
Colorado College Tigers have just their stride in this game and lost 
to 0. After this came the best 



closed one of the best seasons m 
the history of the sohool. Starting 
out with comparatively weak ma- 
terial from last year's squad they 
finished up with the most colorful 
and fighting team in the confer- 
ence. Whenever the Tigers were 
playing, people came to see them 
because they knew that win or lose 
the Tigers would fight to the last. 
The first game was with Colorado 
Aggies, a team the Tigers had not 
defeated for five years. The Tig- 
ers fought from the beginning of 
the game until the last whistle and 
came out the winner by a score of 
14 to 13. Denver University was 
encountered at Denver and in t h e 
last two minutes to play the Tiger 
captain, "Dutch" Clark, kicked a 
drop-kick and won the game 3 to 
2. That game was the main topic 
of conversation throughout the 
whole Rocky Mountain conference 
for several weeks. Then a slump 
came for the Tigers when they 
played Utah Aggies at Logan, Utah. 
The Tigers could not seem to h i t 



game of the season with Utah Uni- 
versity at homecoming. The team 
went On the field that day, predict- 
ed by sports writers to lose by 30 
or 40 points. But the Tigers fight- 
ing for a conference championship, 
were not to be easily scored upon 
and beaten by them as had the 
other teams in the conference. It 
was not "Dutch" Clark that held 
Utah to a 1 2 to 3 score, but it was 
eleven fighting Tigers, fighting all 



Boulder, Colo. — The freshman 
class of the university voted to 
pledge $5,000 to the Student Union 
Memorial building fund at a recent 
meeting. This is to be collected one 
dollar a person each quarter until 
the total is paid. This building is 
to be used for all activities with the 
exception of athletics. It has been 
customary for each class to pledge 
toward the Union Building and 
about $75,000 more is needed to 
complete the necessary subscrip- 
tions. 



the time. No tribute is great 
enough to be paid to that Tiger 
team that was glorious in defeat 
that day. The Western State game 
the next week-end was only an ex- 



hibition of the Tiger scoring ms 
chine in action. The game wit 
Boulder the next week was a figt 
to the finish for the Tigers, an 
even then, they came out with th 



The Seasoas Greetings and Best Wishes for the New Year. 



Quality 



""^ ' ^^^ and n„j /-, 



laundry 

"ivi D^i; chaninq Service 



J. C. Penney Co, 

Inc, 

We Don't Sell "Seconds" 

It Never Pays to Take Chances 
With Quality 

Although a century apart in time we are as rigidly careful of 
the Quality of our merchandise as the old Craftsman whoso 
reputation was bound up in every article that left his shop. 

That is why we don't sell "seconds," why our nightshirts are 
cut full and long, and why we make the inner solas of our shoes 
of the same tough, long-wearing leather as the outer. 

Quality is that part of your purchase you cannot see. We 
have kept faith with our customers for over a quarter of a 
century. 




' 


THE TIGER 


13 


CURRENT ART EXHIBITIONS 
MUSIC 


THEATRE 


CINEMA REVIEWS— BOOKS 
DRAMA 



Cheyenne School 
Gives Shaw's Play 

The Students of Cheyenne Moun- 
tain High School are presenting this 
year, for the twelfth annual time, 
their Christmas play, The Littlest 
Wise-Man. Five performances, 
starting next Sunday, will be giv- 
en the school auditorium. 

The play was written by Lloyd 
Shaw, Colorado College graduate 
and now principal of Cheyenne 
School. His wife, Dorothy Stott 
Shaw, is responsible for the many 
delightful poems in the production. 
All the directing and coaching is 
done by Dr. Shaw. 

Melvin Weimer, a former C. C. 
student played the leading roll for 
many years. After his graduation, 
Donald Haney, now a fresihman 
here, skillfully adapted himself to 
the part of the Littlest Wise-man. 
This year, a third understudy in 
the form of an eighth grade boy, 
will make his debut. 

The presentation is free to the 
public, being given each year as a 
gift from the children of the school 
to the people of the community. 
The wide-spread interest that it 
stimulates is shown by the fact that 
every ticket for the five perform- 
ances next week has been given 
out. 



KOSHARE ORGANIZED BY 
TWO SOCIETIES IN '25 




Merry 
Christmas 

WAYMIRE 
Clothing Co. 

HART 

SCHAFFNER 

and MARX 

CLOTHES 



During the winter of 1925 and 
1926 there was a union of two 
dramatic clubs; namely. The Girls 
Dramatic Club 
and Piersons Dra- 
matic Club, the 
ater being the 
outgrowth of a 
debating society. 
This combine 
formed Koshare. 
Previous to this union there was 
much comment as to the ineffective 
production of the different clubs. 
The name Koshare was taken 
because of its particular aptness to 
a college in the southwest region. 
Koshare really is a fraternity among 
the Toas Indians. The purpose of 
this organization was to gather 
food and store it; then when hard 
times came around they gave the 
food away and also put on little 
plays and the like, endeavoring to 
relieve the feeling of depression. 

This year Koshare under the able 
leadership of Mr. A. C. Sharp has 
started a series of the true drama, 
"Th Wild Duck" being the first pro- 
duction. Early in the second se- 
mester another play will be given. 
Anyone may try out for a part in 
the play, and credit is given for en- 
trance in Koshare, not only for act- 
ing but for work on the stage, e- 
lectrical work and advertising. 



TICKETS ON SALE FOR 
GAME AT SPORT STORE 



An advance sale af tickets for 
that game is large and it is expected 
that the gymnasium, which seats 
1 ,200 people people, will be loaded 
to capacity. Any local fans who 
want to see the game may leave 
their names at the Colorado Sport- 
ing Goods company and tickets will 
be secured for them. 

Phone Main 1346-W j 

Merry Christmas 

FASHIONABLE APPAREL FOR WOMEN AND MISSES 
ROBES— LOUNGING PAJAMAS 

105 South Tejon 



BURNS THEATRE 

Ziegfeld's "Glorifying the Amer- 
ican Girl" which opens Sunday at 
the Burns in all the gorgeous splen- 
dor that one would expect from 
any production, stage or screen, 
bearing the magic name of Florenz 
Ziegfeld. 

With many of its spectacle scenes 
reproduced in full colors by the im- 
proved Technicolor Process, with 
scores of stunningly beautiful girls 
in the singing and dancing ensem- 
bles, with lavish settings, with com- 
edy, drama and a heart-gripping 
story this moving panorama of 
womanly pulchritude moves across 
the alltalking silverscreen in a con- 
tinual parade of highly absorbing 
amusement. 

Mary Eaton, dancing star of Zieg- 
feld shows on Broadway, and late- 
ly the leading woman in "The Co- 
coanuts" with the Four Marx broth- 
ers on the talking screen, is t h e 
ambitious young dancer who final- 
ly makes good and becomes a glori- 
fied beauty with Ziegfeld following 
a series of glamorous experiences. 
She is adequately supported by Dan 
Healy, Edward Crandall, Olive 
Shea, Kaye Renard and Sarah Ed- 
wards — all of them well-known 
Broadway performers. 

In a special revue scene — a show 
within the big show — audiences are 
treated to the inimitable perform- 
ances of Eddie Cantor, who ap- 
pears in a hilarious skit; Helen 
Morgan, who sings a typical blues 
song; and Rudy Vallee, who croons 
in the best Vallee manner, accom- 
panied by his band. 



CHRISTINA WITH 

JANET GAYNOR 



When public interest in aviation 
reached a new high peak following 
the successful termination of many 
note-worthy flights, some film ex- 
ecutives consented to allow their 
favored players to fly. Among 
those who enthusiasm required a 
bona fide license to pilot a plane 
was Charles Morton of Fox Films, 
now playing the leading masculine 
role opposite Janet Gaynor in 
"Christina." Although he has ad- 
vanced to the point in ihis training 
which insures his ability to fly so- 
lo, to date he has confined such 
maneuvering to dual control. 
"Christina," by the way, is coming 
to the America Theatre, Sunday 
for 3 days. 




with JANET GAYNOR 

Charles Morton 
Rudolph Schildkraut 

AMERICA 

Sunday for 3 days 



REWARD! 

LOST— Black and white Sheaf- 
fer lifetime pencil. Return to Ralph 
Heter, Sigma Chi House. 



"You're Sure They're Pure" 

Pecan Divinity 
at 35c lb. 

This is the popular va- 
nilla flavored Divinity 
made with sweet Pecan 
meats — the feature for 
Saturday, the 14th. 

5 S. Tejon Dem'S 



Starts Sunday 

Publix First 

Anniversary 

Week Celebration 

ZIEGFELD'S 

"GLORIFYING 
THE 

AMERICAN 
GIRL" 

with 

EDDIE CANTOR 
MARY EATON 
RUDY VALLEE 
HELEN MORGAN 
and a Chorus of 

DAZZLING 
BEAUTIES 

inn ^TALKING 
I yn% SINGING 

I UU /^DANCING 



THE BURNS 

PARAMOUNT 

A Publix Theatre 



14 



THE TIGER 



Subscribe NOW for thi 



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GAZETTE-TELEGRAPH 

Morning — Evening — Sunday All The News All The Time 



Daily Only 
55c per month 



Combination 
$1.30 per month 



Daily and Sunday 
75c per month 



/Ifcerr^ f mae 



We wish you all a Merry 
Xmas — But, will you have it? 
Without — a New Suit — an 
overcoat or a Tuxedo. 

We offer you a choice of 
more than a thousand at one 
low price of 



$22-50 



And, oh Boy! if you think 
they are not regular fellows 
— you have another think 
coming. 

We put them against — any 
$37.50 and $40.00 and up to 
$45.00 in captivity. 
Our store here is a replica of 
their stores in New York 
where they have 8 and our 
garments identical, our prices 
the same here as there and 
the stores are nationally 
known as 

Cbc Ttrmbilt 




20 N. Tejon 
P. L. THORSEN, Mgr. 



MURRAY'S 

GIFT SUGGESTIONS 



FOR WOMEN 


FOR MEN 


Desk Sets Bath Room 


Flashlights 


Traveling Sets 


Kodaks Scales 


Fountain Pens 


Razor 


Perfume Sprays Perfume Sets 


Pencils 


Razor Stropper 


Perfume Bath Salts 


Desk Sets 


Military 


Cigarette Cases Compacts 


Cigars 


Brushes 


Cigarette Candies 


Cigarettes 


Thermos 


Holders Thermos 


Pipes 


Bottles 


Manicure Sets Bottles 


Cigar Holders 


Playing Cards 


Fountain Pens Toilet Waters 


Cigarette 


Bill Folds 


Stationery Traveling Sets 


Holders 


Cigar Cases 


Photo Album Bridge Cards 


Ash Trays 


Cigarette Cases 



See Our Unusual Assortment of Christmas 
Cards, Seals and Tags 

832 North Tejon Main 189 



KAPPA SIGS WIN GREEK 
CUP BY SWIM VICTORY 



The first annual swim meet, held 
at the Broadmoor Pool December 
7, was won by Kappa Sigma. By 
virtue of this win the Kappa Sigs 
won the Greek Sports Cup. The 
meet proved to be a big success for 
the fraternities and to the specta- 
tors it was thrilling. 

Points were awarded as follows, 
for first place 250, second 150 and 
third 100: Final: 

Kappa Sigma — 1300. 

Phi Delta Theta— 1050. 

Phi Gamma Delta— 1000. 

Beta Theta Pi— 500. 

Sigma Chi— 150. 

The results of the events are: 

25 yard free style — ^Time 14 sec- 
onds. 

1 . Blodgett — Kappa Sig. 

2. McCluskey— Beta. 

3. Van Dyke— Phi Gam. 
50 yd. free style — Time 32.5 

1 . Vessey — Kappa Sig. 

2. Smith— Phi Delt. 

3. Triggs — Beta. 

50 yd. Breast Stroke — Time 42.3 

1 . Baker — Phi Gam. 

2. Ferryman — Sig Chi. 

3. Pomeroy — Kappa Sig. 

100 yd. Free Style— Time 1:15.7 

1 . Blodgett — Kappa Sig. 

2. Sutton— Phi Delt. 

3. Wiedman — Phi Gam. 

25 yd. Back Stroke— Time 19.7 

1. Vessey — Kappa Sig 

2. Wiedman — Phi Gam. 

3. Stapleton — Beta. 
Fancy Diving — • 

1. Tate— Phi Delt. 

2. Van Dyke— Phi Gam. 

3. Kintz — Kappa Sig. 
Relay — Time 58 

1. Phi Delts — (Wade, 
Randall, Tate) 

2. Betas. 

3. Phi Gams. 



Smith, 



Starbuck and McGrory 
To Play On Star Team 

Leon "Hap" Starbuck and 
"Chuck" McGory, Tiger linemen, 
will play on the Rocky Mountain 
Conference All-Star team which 
meets the selected team from the 
North Central Conference of the 
Dakotas at Denver on New Year's 
Day. The team which represents 
the Rocky Mountain region in the 
Elks Charity Benefit game will be 
practically an all-conference aggre- 
gation. Eighteen men, including 
McGory and Starbuck of Colorado 
College, Carr of Mines, Jonas of 
Utah, and Call of Utah Aggies, 
have accepted invitations. The 
team will go to Denver just after 
Christmas to begin practice. 



STOCK BROS. 
Food Store 

119 East Colo. Ave. 

Fancy Dry Picked Turkeys, 
Pascal Celery, Plum Pudding 
and etc. for your 

CHRISTMAS DINNER 

Main 4303 and 4304 



This week's Candy Special 
Chocolates 40c lb. 

Barthel'S 

Tejon Street at 
Acacia Park Comer 



A Good Christmas Gift For 50c 

"TALKS TO STUDENTS" 
Some Comments: A Columbia 
professor: Admirable in its frank- 
ness and in its content. President 
of a Woman's College; Much of it 
is good but much dangerous. A 
University president: A very vital 
message to students. A Catholic 
professor and a Presbjrterian min- 
ister: I think it took some courage 
to say these splendid things before 
a college chapel. A Massachusetts 
professor: I would that all our stu- 
dents might read it. An author 
(man) : I like especially your last 
talk — on business: it is calm and 
masterful. An author (woman) : 
The great message to me has been 
its searching and lovely social vis- 
ion. A Student: I do not know 
where to begin to tell you how very 
much your little book has meant 
to me. 

For sale at MURRAY'S DRUG 
STORE. 



THE J. S. BROWN 

MERCANTILE 

COMPANY 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



BUSY CORNER 
SHOE SHOP 

Shines — Shoe Repairs 
And Hats Blocked 



E. L. Bruce 

BARBER SHOP 

28 E. Kiowa 



THE TIGER 



A SERVICE 
for Every Purse 



THE 
PEARL LAUNDRY 



"It Pays To Look Well' 

Alamo Hotel 

BARBER AND BEAUTY SHOP 

R. W. Counts. Prop. 
Phone Main 1255-W 124 S. Tejon 



BUICK AND MARQUETTE 
MOTOR CARS 

Strang's 



Harry D. MacDonald 
President 



Made in Colorado Springs 

VAN BRIGLE 
ART POTTERY 

The world's most famous 
art pottery. 

Visitors always welcome. 



When thinking of Christmas think 
of flowers from 




30 N. Tejon Phone M. 214 



Rhone Main 1710 

IDEAL 

A CLEANERS 

5 West Colorado Ave. 



Valetor Pressing Service 



Christmas Puzzles 
College Students 

By Larry Johnson 
It was a beautiful day in Decem- 
ber. A gentle zehpyr (meaning 
breeze) wandered idly through the 
leafless trees on the campus of old 
C. C. Not a cloud was in the sky. 
The sun beamed on the earth in a 
placid manner, while the last bit of 
show languished into tears and dis- 
appeared. It was the kind of day 
that could make one forget all his 
troubles. The frigid (meaning 
cold) dignity of the seniors melted 
until a few of them even began to 
smile a little. 

But hold! What is this we see? 
Our hero, Reginald de Gas-pipe sits 
on the steps of Palmer Hall en- 
veloped in clouds of blackest mel- 
ancholy. Gloom sat enthroned up- 
on his brow (meaning he had the 
blues) . 

An awe-struck group of students 
gazed from a respectful distance 
as he tore great handfuls of hair 
from his head and flung it upon 
the breeze, while deep sobs shook 
his manly frame, and loud groans 
caused all who passed to stop and 
exclaim in pity. Finally Percival 
Von Dish-rag, a fraternity brother, 
noted the crowd that was gathering 
and, prompted by curiousity, 
strolled over and Schouldered his 
way through the mob until he 
could see the object of their atten- 
tion. 

His face blanched. Here was 
good old Reggie, the most light- 
hearted, care-free student in C. C. 
suffering in an agony of despair! 
Reggie, whose emberant spirits had 
carried him through life on a dow- 
ny cushion of laughter and bub- 
bles; Reggie, who never ihad been 
in doubt or despair in all his life; 
Reggie, whose cocky, egotistic bra- 
vado and irressistable grin had 
made him the idol of tht campus! 
Here was this same Reggie m this 
unbelievable state of mind, when 
everybody else was rejoicing at the 
nearness of the Christmt s vacation. 
Amazed, he stepped up to Reg- 
gie and tapped him on the shoul- 
der. The grief on the counte- 
nance that was raised to his, 
wrenched his heart. If ever stark 
despair gazed from a man's eyes, 
it did from Reginald de Gas-pipe's 
at that moment. Percy turned to 
the gaping bystanders and gave 
them a scowl that caused them to 
turn and slink objectly away. Then 
he sat down on the steps beside 
Reggie and put his arm across his 
buddy's shoulder, "Why, Reggie. 
what's wrong, old fellow. What 
causes this grief? Did your rich 
uncle in Mestopotamia recover?" 

"Oh," groaned Reggie, "II isn'l 
thai!" 



GERMAN CLUB MEETING 
HELD WEDNESDAY NIGHT 



The German club held its annual 
Christmas party in Ticknor study 
Wednesday evening. A varied en- 
tertainment was furnished the mem- 
bers and their guests. The first 
number was the presentation of the 
Krippenspiel, given in the German 
tongue. In the second act the en- 
tire audience joined in the song fes- 
tival, singing "Stille nacht, heilige 
Nacht! "0 du frohliche, o du sel- 
ige,' and "Ihr Kinderlein homet." 

After this play, refreshments were 
served; and they were real German 
eats, having been imported from the 
Fatherland. They consisted of leb- 
kuchen, Pfeffernuesse, Aniskuchen, 
and other cakes, coffee, ice cream, 
and Marcikan. After the refresh- 
ments, there was general dancing, 
ranging from the twists and twirls of 
the Dutchland to the American hop, 
skip, and jump. 

The crib play was presented by 
twenty-two players. Gale Dyne was 
the announcing angel, supported by 
six other angels, including Marianna 
Sackett, Gerturde Hammer, Mar- 
jorie Ferguson, Lewis Wiley, Mar- 
garet Bissonnette, and Sonia Bend- 
eroff. The part of the three wise 
men were taken by Marian Deutsch, 
Abe Mogilner, and Louis Yard. 
Bill Thomas, Robert Ritter, Jim 
Turner, Merle Larson, Cornhusker 
Neumarker, Harold Schultz, Paul 
Vestal, and Hartley Murray, were 
the shephards. Duane Brough had 
the character of Joseph, and Mar- 
garet Sullivan was the little virgin. 
The players were coaohed by Mrs. 
Sutton. 

The opening overture, played by 
Darcy Shock, was from "William 
Tell." She was accompanied by 
Mildred Hazlitt. Mrs. E. C. Wilm 
played for the group singing. 

Charles Cogan and Joe Rohrer 
had charge of stage arrangements. 



"Hc.ve you received br.d news? 
A telegram? Is somebody dead?" 

"No!" 

"Have you flunked out of 
school?" 

Reggie's only answer was to 
shake his head and groan again, 
while large tears splattered down 
on the steps beside him. 

"Zounds, man! It must be ser- 
ious! Did someone tell you that 
there isn't any Santa Claus?" 

"Well, come on, old fellow, tell 
your buddy what your trouble is?" 

Reggie slowly raised his head 
and gazed mournfully at the hori- 
zon. He look a deep breath, start- 
ed to speak, but was convulsed by 
grief. Finally, he managed to say, 
between the sobs that made his 
broad shoulders shake like a jelly- 
fish on a Ford fender. 



THE 

WHITE WAY 

SYSTEM 

Open Until 2 A. M. 



Try 



ir delidoas White 
Way ChiU 

11 N. Tejon St. 



4. 



tl 



OWARD'S 

BARBER 
SHOP 



19 East Bijou Street 



The Colorado Planing 
Mill Co. 

MILL WORK OF ALL 
DESCRIPTIONS 

PADDLES 
Frank Mitchell, Manager 

Rhone 2876-W 
525 W. Colorado Ave. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



CITY COAL 

15 East Pikes Peak Avenue 

Phone 

Main 67 or 120 



The Ice Cream 
that's a C. C. 
"Institution" 

The between Class "Cones", 
I h e sandwich materials and 
candy, the ice creams and ices 
tor class and club functions. 

From Frosh to Grad it's t h e 
place evvy Tiger knows. 

MoWRY'S 

Across from Campus 

Main 1183. 1184 



THE TIGER 



^n (3nsttt«ttatt 
of p^rsmtal 



Ktaict 






I just couldn't think of a thing* 
really clever to give for 
Christmas... so I got Geraldine 
and we went down to Kaufman's 
. . they always have such smart 
things . . and sure enough 
found everything I wanted . . 
from a big furry teddy bear that 
really growls — for Baby — to a 
nice warm bath robe for Grand- 
pa. I used to think I had to 
make a list of the things I 
wanted to give . . . but 
now I know that's ob- 
solete . . . Kaufman's solved the 
problem for me without it. r 



8:30 to 
5:30 





IIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIMIMIIIIMIIIIIIIlnltllllllllllll 



Ohe Colorado College <^^ 

rtiBi 



IVW^I 



A' 






VOLUME XXXII 
Number 14 



Oflicial Students Publication 

January 10, 1930 



Gamp dolor ado 




FORESTRY STUDENTS measuring the height of seedlings in the 
Manitou Forest. Camp Colorado, in the Manitou Forest, gives students 
a place for a thorough technical training in the fundamentals of forestry. 





mm\mm\mmmmm\m 



\\ i 




MUIUIIIIIIMNIIJIUIIJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



Office of Publication: 23 Weit Colorado Aw.. Colorado Spring!, Colo. 



THE TIGER 



Sunday Nite Will Be College Nite at the 

APACHE INN 

MUSIC FROM 7 TO 12 BY CARL PUFFER AND HIS COLOR ADOANS 



Regular Dinner - - 75c 
Toasted Sandwiches - 20c 
No Cover Chargfe 
Hy land 241 



Friday night will Be 
Students Night 



FOR PLUMBING AND HEATING WORK 

^»^°- BUMSTEAD'S ^^f 

"Where Your Dollars Have More Cents" 



"FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE" 

We Dry Clean 

"Phone us first" Gents* 

Hats 

Topcoats 

Tuxedos 

Gloves 

Ties 

Etc. 
Sweaters 




M. 2958 



PlCCLY^WlCGLY 



ALL OVER THE WORLD 

FIVE BUSY STORES IN 

COLORADO SPRINGS 



Exclusive Agents for 

Underwood Typewriters 

Including the 

Underwood Noiseless 



A. L. STARK 

TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 

PHONE MAIN 4671 831 N. lEJON 



SPECIAL EVENING DINNERS 

From 6 to 7:30 P. M. 

35c The COLLEGE INN 35c 



Knorr's Market 

FOR YOUR PARTIES OR PICNICS 



Let us supply you with 
good things to eat 



123 North Tejon 



Phone 2602 



ELECTROL OIL BURNERS 
Plumbing Heating 



312 N. 
Custer 



"rfey 



Phone 
Main 
1674 



Called For — Delivered— Laundered — 
and Ready to Use 

SHEETS 7 cents 

BATH TOWELS 2 cents 

NAPKINS 1 cent 

The Elite Way 

IS the Most Economical 

PHONE MAIN 82 

LAUNDRY and 
DRY CLEANING 




Issued Friday of each week. Entered at the Post Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter 



giuId TIGtER 



VOLUME XXXII 



Colorado College Weekly News Magazine 



Number 14 



WESTERN STATE SQUAD 
MEETS TIGEK TO NIGHT 

By Chauncey Biodgett, Jr. 

Tonight the Tigers will ring the 
curtain up on their 1930 home hoop 
season when they meet the Western 
State five on the floor of the city 
auditorium in the first of a two 
game series. Tiger fans will be 
more than anxious to see their rep- 
sentatives on the basketball court 
this season. 

The Mountaineers have been 
producing mediocre teams for some 
seasons past, but fans looking for 
weak competition tonight are due 
for a jolt. The invaders, in their 
first game of the season, defeated 
the D. U. five decisively — playing 
3n the Denver floor, and with all 
the odds favoring the ministers. 
The fact that the western team lost 
the second game with Denver means 
nothing, since their victory of the 
previous night shows potential pow- 
er that might be unloosed at a n y 
time. 

Coaches at Western State this 
year were faced with a wealth of 
material when they issued the toscin 
for hoop candidates. In addition to 
some experienced letter-men, speedy 
candidates from the frosh answered 
the call — among them prominent 
basketball flashes in the local ihigh 
school league, and others from the 
southern part of the state. 

The Tigers will probably start 
the same combination that faced 
Kansas Aggies on the second night. 
Waters and Doyle on the scoring 
end of the machine, Captain 
"Dutch" Clark at center, and Ryer- 
son and Reid at guards. Last min- 
ute changes are possible — but not 
probable. 

(Continued on page 9) 

Journalism Class Will 
Visit Farm Newspaper 



Mr. Green, publisher of the Colo- 
rado Springs Farm News, has in- 
vited the journalism class of Colo- 
rado College to visit his printing of- 
fice. According to Mr. Lawson of 
the journalism department, the in- 
spection tour will be made very 
soon. 

"The object of this visit is to il- 
lustrate more forcefully the differ- 
ence between the organization of a 
daily and a weekly," Mr. Green 
stated in an mterview. 

The Farm News is widely known. 
It finds its way into many schools 
and colleges of the country as it is 
a model of what a farm weekly 
should be. 



Student Failure 
Survey is Made 

Mrs. Josephine R. Morrow, Reg- 
istrar of the college, has been mak- 
ing an extensive study of why stu- 
dents leave college. She has com- 
piled the following statistics: 

Students who leave college be- 
fore the end of the year, the rea- 
sons and percentages for leaving, 
although necessarily incomplete, are 
distributed as follows: 

Poor scholarship 21% 

Financial 20% 

Illness 13% 

Not adapted to college 

discipline 9 

Home conditions 1 I 

Married while in college 4 

Went to another school 4 

Miscellaneous and unknown.... 1 3 

Of the I 14 who dropped out be- ican Colleges 
cause of various reasons, 57 were 
below average, 32 were average 
and 25 were above average in their 
high school work. 

The chief reasons for failures 
are: 

1 . Inability to change from the 
attitude \n high school to that 
required in college. 

2. Too many activities. 

3. Students haven't been taught 
to work independently. 

4. Inability to persist in study is 
by all odds the chief cause of 
failure among these students. 



JUNIOR FARCE TO BE PRESENTED 
NEXT WEEK AT LITTLE THEATRE 



Insignia Day Ceremony Held On Thur. 



Beginning with the academic 
procession, the annual Insignia Day 
exercises were held in Perkin's Hall 
at 11:30 on Thursday morning. 
The faculty, the Senior Class, and 
the Junior Class took part in the 
program which gave to the sixty- 
four members of the class of 1930 
recognition of their rank. Presi- 
dent Mierow addressed the students 
on "The Colorado College of t h e 
future," telling of the ideals and 
aims which the Board of Trustees 
of Colorado College hope to reach 
by the new endowment fund. 

His address in part: 

"It has long been customary at 
Colorado College to give special 
recognition to each successive sen- 
ior class by the observance of an 
annual Insignia Day. We are as- 
sembled this morning to do honor 
to the graduating class of 1930. As 
is usual on such an occasion, the 
members of the Faculty — as well as 
the Senior Class — appear today in 



By T. C. Tate. , 

"Find a play!" "Find a play!" 

With the monotony of a ticking metronome, this phrase vibrates 
through the mind of the producer. 

It still is the fashion for brave men to don strange clothes and 

penetrate vast forests or deserts in search of rare birds and beasts. But 

the real "big game hunt" of the American continent is the quest for a 

play which will have just that mixture of human interest, comedy, pathos 

and drama to suit the public taste 

— especially the college audience. 

Director Arthur Sharp has done 
just that. He has picked a play 
that will please even the most fas- 
tidious. He has chosen a play 
called, "What Happened to Jones" 
and has selected a cast that is ca- 
pable of handling the script in top- 
notch fashion. 

Bill Hinkley heads the cast and is 
expected to give a dashing perform- 
ance in the role of Jones. Bill is 
known on the campus as an athletic 
personality of note and promises to 
give his followers a performance 
equal to any of his endeavors on 
the field. Sharing honors with 
Hinkley is Maxine Moore. She is 
pretty and will be superb in the de- 
lineation of the character of Cissy 
— Professor Goodley's ward. Mary 
Strachan, who will be remember- 
ed in the "Wild Duck," plays Mrs. 
Goodley. Marjorie and Minerva, 
the daughters of the Goodleys are 
excellently handled by Lorna Dor- 
lac and Mathilda Willis, respectful- 
ly. Duke Tucker will be seen in 
the role of Richard, Marjorie's fi- 
ancee. Humphrey Saunders enacts 
the character of Bishop of Ballarat, 
the brother of Prof. Goodley. Al 
Giesecke appears as the keeper of 
an Insane Asylum. John Thurston 
is thoroughly entertaining in the 
roles of a madman and policeman. 
Genevieve Engel adds greatly to the 
comedy as Helma, the maid of Prof. 
Goodley's household. 

The plot of "What Happened To 
Jones" is one affording many com- 
edy situations. The lines are clev- 
er, the characters are real everyday 
people and the story moves with 
rapid-fire motion that will not be 
dull for a moment. Mistaken iden- 
tities — madmen — conspiring 
daughters — clergymen ?nd an allur- 
ing love match all combine to prom- 
ise one of the best plays ever given 
by the Junior Class. Don't miss this 
clever performance by the Junior 
Farce players to be seen January 
the 16th and 17th. 



Mierow Goes to 
Capital Saturday 

President C. C. Mierow will leave 
on Saturday for Washington, D. C. 
to attend the Association of Amer- 
Convention. Presi- 
dent Mierow will speak before the 
conference on "College Buildings 
in America." Delegates from 600 
colleges will attend the meetings. 
Other speakers who will address the 
convention, are President Hoover 
and two ambassadors. 

While in Washington, President 
M-erow will also attend the meet- 
ings of the Association of Colleges 
of the Congregational Affiliation. 
Dr. Mierow is president of this 
group. At the close of these meet- 
ings, he will meet with alumni in 
Washington, New York, and Bos- 
ton to discuss Colorado College. 



the traditional academic costume 
associated with scholarly achieve- 
ment. 

"It may be appropriate at the 
outset, therefore, to remind you that 
the cap, gown and hood are not 
only symbolic of literary and scho- 
lastic interests and attainment but 
that they indicate clearly, to the in- 
itiated, both the actual degree and 
also the Alma Mater of the wearer. 
Thus your own baccaulaureate 
hoods will be lined with the colors 
of Colorado College — a gold chev- 
ron upon a field of black silk — - 
and the velvet border, white for 
arts or gold yellow for science, will 
indicate your chief field of interest. 
The Master's hood is similar to the 
Bachelor's but is bordered by a 
broader strip of velvet. 

"Bachelor's. Master's and Doc- 
tor's gowns differ in a manner pre- 
scribed by custom, and may be most 
readily distinguished from each 

(Continued on paKC 4) 



THE TIGER 




at The Chapel Inn 



Each Friday night has been designated as "Col- 
lege Night" at this unique inn. Tonight — after 
the game — why not accept our invitation to dance. 
There's an excellent floor — you know Darwin 
Coil's orchestra — and the cover charge is only 
fifty cents. 

The Chapel Inn is admirable for 
bridge luncheons, teas and dinner 
dzinces. Always an excellent cuisine 
served in surroundings as different 
as they are delightful. 




Interesting News About 
"MorWear Pajamas" 

In 2 Groups — 
Specially Priced 

Something new in Pajamas, of Fruit of 
the Loom broadcloth and Winsdor 
Washanready krinkle crepe. Alluring- 
ly striped or dotted with coin like dots, 
generously sprinkled with flowers or 
modernisticly printed, with blouse 



modestly tucked-in or hanging loose. Going from one ex- 
treme to another in sleeves — long to the wrist or none 
at all. Color combinations, red, blue, green, 
pink, peach, orchid - -- 

This group has a special guarantee of colors. Large 
assortment of prints, in floral, modernistic and polka dot 

patterns. Slip-on, sleveles s styles, in tuck- 
ins only -— ----- 



C^V^iSS^^ 



$1.95 

olors. Large 
ind polka dot 

$1.29 




INSIGNIA DAY HELD 
THURSDAY MORNING 



(Contlnuea from page 3) 

other by the cut of the sleeves. You 
will note that a Bachelor's gown has 
open, flowing sleeves; the Master's 
gown has sleeves that are entirely 
closed; the Doctor's has full, round- 
ed open sleeves. 

"The institution granting the de- 
gree may be learned from an in- 
spection of the colors in the lining 
of the hood. The various faculties 
are indicated by the color of the 
velvet facings as follows: brown is 
for Fine Arts; pink for Music; 
light blue for Education; dark blue 
for Philosophy; green for Medic- 
ine; scarlet for Theology; purple 
for Law. Black velvet serves to in- 
dicate the possession of a Doctor's 
degree without designating the 
special field." 

"These distinctions are as sharp 
and clear-cut as the insignia which 
mark graduations of rank in mili- 
tary service or as those which de- 
note participation in the various 
branches of athletics. And as there 
are special medals and honors for 
distinguished service in warfare and 
golden emblems for champion ath- 
letes, so too there is the golden key 
which serves to mark unusual pre- 
eminence in scholarship. So much 
for the outward manifestations of 
academic rank and achievement. ' 

"But, as Booth Tarkington once 
said: 'It isn't the medal that makes 
the Victoria Cross man splendid; 
it's his being that sort of a man. 
The true rewards of the scholar are 
likewise to be sought first in the 
inner life, and then in the undoubt- 
ed power which knowledge brings." 

Phi Delta and Hypatia 
Win Pan Pan Awards 



"The Dope", presented by Phi 
Delta Theta, won the five dollar 
prize for the best fraternity act in 
the 1929 Pan Pan. The prize for 
the best society act was award- 
ed to the Hypatia society for their 
"clock" act. 

"The Dope", which opened the 
college vaudeville acts, gave a hair- 
raising thrill to the audience while 
a serrch for a mysterious murder- 
er, "The Dope," was culminated in 
the fiend's appearance on the stage. 

Hypatia's act represented a 
clock. Every hour of a girl's busy 
day was shown, from early morn- 
ing when it is so hard to awaken, 
through the morning work and play, 
afternoon, and finally to late in the 
evening when she is tired and ready 
to end the day in sleep. 

The committee who judged the 
acts included Dean Lovitt, Dean 
Hershey, and Arthur Sharp. 




Here's Your 

VICTOR 
RECORD 



Headquarters Come in and hea 

for the latest releases i 

ninm °"^ ventilated tris 

RADIO ^"^ 

^BrunTwfck' ^PVRNITVRE ^ 
113-115 N.Tcjon 



CHOCOLATES 

Good as Made 

Box Goods a Specialty 

WALLACE CANDY COMPANY 



j Frank Geddy Says— 

I This is a dern good paper 
} but why run so many con- 
I tinued stories. 

The Shoe Shop 

Across from the High School 



"You're Sure They're Pure" 

Assorted Creait 
Patties, 35c. lb. 

The delicious vanilla 
and chocolate Genesee 
Cream, also cocoanut 
and maple, in the as- 
sortment as the feature 
for Saturday, the 1 1 th. 

26 S. Tejon DCril'l 



£? 



Strachan's 
S^veet 
Shop 

Bijou and Nevada 

Try oar Malts and Toasted 

Sandwiches 



PLAZA 

DINING 
ROOM 

"The Place to Eat" 

Breakfast Luacheon 

Dinner 



THE TIGER 



Photographs of our Colorado 
mountains. Nicely made — 
attractively colored by hand. 
Moderate in price — framed 
or unframed. 

H. L. STANDLEY 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs 



CADILLAC 

and 

CHRYSLER 

MOTORCARS 

Adams Motor Co. 

Marksheffel Building 



Hey-Service 

The 
HEYSE SHEET 
METAL WORKS 

INC. 

219 N.Weber 
Main 552 



W. I. Lucas 

HAS 

EVERYTHING IN 

SPORTING GOODS 
"Tigers always welcome" 

119 N. Tejon St. 
Main 900 



'I HEREBY SOLEMLY 
RESOLVE—" 



When you consider that you 
can purchase any make type- 
writer on monthly payments 
as small as $5.00 it is not a 
question of affording it 

The essential question is if 
you can afford to be without 



The 
Typewriter 



125 N. Tejon 



Main 95 



By Larry Johnston 

It was a room in McGregor Hall. 
Five female freshies were seated on 
the bed, or on the cushions, or what 
have you. The looks on their fac- 
es were stern and solemn. 

"I am," declared Mimi, a slim 
little damsel with brown curls and 
the most delectable lips, "I am ab- 
solutely swearing off of all dates. 
From now on a pair of pants won t 
mean a thing — I don't care if it is 
Rudy Vallee himself. I'm gonna 
settle down and study — I honestly 
AM." 

"Speaking or resolutions — ," said 
Marg, "Mary and I have resolved 
to let our hair grow. Long hair is 
so much more becoming to a college 
woman." 

"And what Marg says, I make a 
carbon copy of," broke in Mary, 
"I'm gonna quit going around with 
my hair cut as short as a high 
school freshman's." 

"Peace be with you, children. 
Just wait 'till you he?,r what Mae 
and I ;have resolved," said Mari- 
anne. 

"My dear, don't tell me that you 
and Mae have made a resolution," 
exclaimed Mimi. 

"If the acoustics of this room are 
what I judge them to be, that is 
just what you heard me say. We're 
gonna reduce or die in the attempt. 
Honestly, I feel like a battleship." 

"Oh, but Marianne," said Mae 
in a mournful tone, "you're a bit 
of thistledown compared to me. 
Why, every time I get in a taxi, the 
driver casts an apprehensive look 
at my ponderous bulk, and adds 
five dollars onto the fare to cover 
wear and tear on the car. If I 
don't quit gaining, I'll soon weigh 
as much as an Egyptian pyramid. 
Why—" 

"Parlor call for Miss Mimi Flit- 
ter." 

"Sweet blooming dandelions. 
That's Bill— I just know it's Bill. 
Help me get ready, quick. There 
— that blue dress — is my lipstick on 
straight? Where's my compact? 
Mary, you'll get my Trig for me to- 
night, won't you? There's a dar- 
ling." 

EXIT— Mimi 

"Oh," said Mae, "so she's the 
girl who was through with dates." 

"Well, there's one thing certain," 
said Marg, "Mary and I are going 
to keep our resolution. Why, just 
look at all the movie stars, they're 
all letting their hair grow. Hon- 
estly — " 

"Oh, Mary, Marg?" came a voice 
from down the hall, "Min just got 
a new hairdresser's magazine with 
some perfectly darling French bobs 
in it." 
EXIT— Mary Flutter and Marg 
CURTAIN 



Woman Gets Job if 
Amendent Passes 



STUDENTS OF FORESTRY GAMBOL 
TIME AWAY AT CAMP COLORADO 

By Richard Tubman and George Kase 
Majors in Forestry 
Quite a transition of study is noticed by the student of forestry 
when he enters the fall term of his Junior year at Camp Colorado. The 
fall term is ten weeks in length, during which he carries eight hours; 
namely, five hours in Mensuration and three hours in Silviculture. Some 
may think these ten weeks an easy going life; at times it is; but ask 
the student that has been there. 

In the place of steam-heated class rooms, the forestry students is 
in the forest, or if the weather does 
not permit, in the rustic old cabin 
where a fireplace is the only means 
of comfort. 

The course of study deals most- 
ly with field work. Some book 
knowledge is absorbed, but not to 
any great extent. The average day 
of field work is eight hours. At 
night the field computations are ar- 
ranged in a prescribed order in 
note-books, which usually takes 
from two to four hours. 

When the fall term is completed 
the student ,has a very good idea of 
the greater part of the 6000 acres 
that make up the Colorado College 
Forest tract. 

Under Mensuration comes t h e 
study of tree growth, timber cruis- 
ing, barometric leveling, marketing 
and scaling timber for the saw-mill 
to be cut into lumber. From the 
saw-mill near camp, a good study 
of lumbering methods may be had. 
Under Silviculture, the study of 
soil, forest types and silvicultural 
systems are considered. No subject 
becomes "dry" to the student be- 
cause there is a continuous variation 
in everything he does. 

"The "cook shack" seems to be 
a place of special interest to the 
student. When the caretaker yells, 
"Come and get it or we'll throw it 
out," very few seconds are wasted 
in getting there; even Prof. Parker 
gets a ramble on. Good food, three 
times a day, and plenty of it. Not 
one leaves the cook shack hungry; 
if he does it's his own fault. 

The favorite sports during spare 
hours are shooting on the rifle range 
horseshoe pitching, and cards. Sing- 
ing by the "Camp Colorado Coy- 
otes," can not be ommitted. "Bull" 
sessions are held at opportune times, 
when all kinds of stores are related 
around the fire-place. Good pre- 
varicaters with straight faces are 
developed. 



Freshman women will be allowed 
a representative on the legislative 
board of the Associated Women 
Students of Colorado College if an 
amendment to the constitution pro- 
viding for such a plan is c arried 
when voted on at a mass meeting 
of the women of the college in Jan- 
uary. Attendance at the meeting 
will be compulsory. The amend- 
ment has been recommended by the 
legislative board of the A. W. S. 

The amendment as proposed 
reads as follows: — "The women of 
the freSfhman class shall be entitled 
to one representative on the legis- 
lative board of the Associated 
Women Students, to be elected by 
the women of the freshman class at 
the beginning of the second semes- 
ter." 



Debate Tryouts to be 
Held on Monday in Pit 

Debate tryouts to decide who 
will represent Colorado College on 
the men's and women's debate 
teams will be held in the Pit in 
Palmer Hall at 4 o'clock on Mon- 
day, January 13. The question will 
be "Resolved, that the nations 
should adopt a plant of complete 
disarmament." It has been inter- 
preted that complete disarmament 
is limited only by armament for po- 
lice purposes. Each person, who 
tries out, must have constructive 
speeches of five minutes and rebut- 
tal speeches of three minutes on 
both sides of the question. 

The debate Conference of t h e 
Rocky Mountain Conference will 
be held at Colorado College on 
February 22, 23, 24, and 25. Tau 
Kappa Alpha will be host to nearly 
seventy-five debaters. At present, 
plans are being made for a debate 
(rip to the East Coast. It will be 
the longest trip ever made by a 
Colorado College debate team. 

Miss Amanda M. Ellis and Mr. 
William D. Copeland are coaches of 
the women's and men's debate 
teams. 



Knute Rockiie, one of the great 
football coaches, attributes the suc- 
cess of his teams to the lack of dis- 
tressing influences. Among t h e 
greatest of these influences he plac- 
es co-eds and he believes that he is 
fortunate in coaching at a school 
where there are only men. 



THE TIGER 



Member of Rocky Mountain 

Inter-Colleeiate Press 

Association 




The Colorado College 

Newspaper, 

Published Weekly by the 

Students. 



THE TIGER 

ArtJclea intended for publication should be left in the Tiger Box, on the first 
floor of Cobum library, by Wednesday noon. No unsigned contributions will be 
published. 

LLOYD H. ELLIS Main 1975 Editor 

James Keyset Associate Editor Barratt O'Hara Desk Editor 

Chauncey H. Blodgett, Jr. Sport Editor Margaret Gillen Society Editor 

Mark Perkinson Feature Editor John W. Haussermann, Jr Lit. Editor 

~"*~~~~~"~"eeporters~~~™~ ~~--~~~~. 

Melba Adams Marjorie Gilbert Marie Hagemeyer Velma Rose 

William Baker Frances Glau Wilmoth Harris Marianna Sackett 

Margery Barkley Clifford Goodson Archie Hess Ivan Schweninger 

Art Bay lis Wayne Campbell Don Horton Ralph Smith 

Arthur Bishop Effie Gilbert Hermina Kahn Kendrick Stone 

Carl Burke Edgar Gregory Fred Nichols Roy Schmeninger 

Margaret Crissman Larry Johnson T. E. Nowels Tom Tate 

Marian MacMillan Hartley Murray Clifford Vessey 



PAT PATTERSON 



.Main 2575 Manager 



ASSISTANT MANAGERS 

Frank Dentan, Jr. Byron Whaley 

Bill Fales Harry Wood 

Doc Gulick Homer Bruce 

Max Schmidt Harold Akin 

Merritt Ritter Circulation Manager 

Assista.nts — Glen Wade, Jack Fisher, Charlotte Pipkin, Elsie Winship, Marguerite 
Smith, Ruth Griffin and Margaretta Barr 



HEALTH FEE. 

As the fall semester draws to a close, many students are wonder- 
ing if they will be required to contribute an additional five dollars to 
their regular tuition next semester for a health fee. All over the cam- 
pus, questions are being asked if one pays this fee every semester, an- 
nually, or once as he does a matriculation fee. 

When the announcement was made last fall that all students were 
to be charged five dollars for a health fee, protests were heard where 
ever students meet. When it was announced that a college nurse would 
inspect all fraternity houses, there was much muttering about the pri- 
vacy of one's room. 

The murmurs against the inspection of fraternity houses have died 
a natural death. Many have seen much good in the new system. But 
the students are still unable to see just where the five dollars they paid 
for a health fee has been used. Before this new health program was 
initiated, there was a college nurse who administered to the wants of 
the women of the college. There has been no added expense for this 
part of the work. Town and men students are charged twenty-five cents 
a call if they do need services of the nurse. Freshman have received 
the benefit of health lectures, but upper classmen have received no ob- 
vious benefit nor has any part of the fund been diverted for their benefit. 

The attitude of the students has changed from that of resenting hav- 
ing what they considered their private habits being searched to a won- 
dering just where their health fee is being spent and if such a fee will 
be asked of them each semester they are in college. Whether they will 
receive something of value next semester remains to be seen. 



FACULTY HEADS RECEIVE RECOGNITION. 

Two members of the Colorado College faculty have been recognized 
recently for their ability in public speaking and research work. Presi- 
dent Mierow leaves Saturday to attend a meeting in Washington where 
he will be on a program with President Hoover and two ambassadors. 
He will speak on "College Chapel Buildings," a subject on which he has 
made a great deal of research. 

William D. Copeland, secretary of the college, has been named the 
only judge for the state of Colorado in a nation wide speaking contest. 
Mr. Copeland is well known in debating circles of the Rocky Mountain 
region, and has served as a judge and officer in many debates and de- 
bating conferences. 

Such recognition of officers of the administration of the college by 
national authorities brings much worth while publicity to the region and 
to Colorado College, and makes one feel that while Colorado College is 
small, there is a great chance for a student to get a personal touch with 
men of national note. 



Old Timer Addresses Journalism Class 

By Mark Perkinson 

"Bygone Trails" was the subject of a talk presented Tuesday morn 
ing to the class in Journalism by Andy Adams, well known novelist an( 
resident of Colorado Springs. Perhaps his best known work is "The 
Log of a Cowboy" though Mr. Adams is the author of a number o 
books depicting life on the western cattle ranges fifty years ago. 

In regard to the importance of old trails Mr. Adams said, "It ha 
been said that the streets of Boston were 'surveyed by a cow and calf, 
for they are so very crooked. In 
reality there is some basis for this 
statement. Not a cow will ever 
go down in the mire but will keep 
up on solid ground. The cows made 
such a path and the people followed 
it. Finally it became enlarged to a 
wagon track. In still later times 
homes were built along it and to- 
day it is a boulevard." 

The modern western roads and 
mountain passes were originally, 
the speaker pointed out, old In- 
dian traces or, more commonly yet, 
old game trails. Here and there in 
this country may still be found the 
old buffalo gaps, places where 
gateways have been cut through a 
narrow strip of land by the passage 
of the buffalo herds. 

The first cattle trails, according 
to Mr. Adams, were those over 



Official Notices 



EVELYN MAY BRIDGES PRIZES 



Attention, poets! Here is your 
chance to win that money you have 
been wanting. The Evelyn May 
Bridges Prizes of $25 and $15 are 
to be awarded at Commencement 
for the best poems written by stu- 
dents of Colorado College. 

Each person may submit as many 
poems as he wishes, but he must 
write under an assumed name, and 
his poems must be typewritten. The 
contest closes May I, 1930. Mem- 
bers of the English Department will 
judge the poems. 

NUGGET PICTURES 

All pictures for the 1931 edition 
of the Pikes Peak Nugget must be 
taken before the twenty-fifth of this 
month. Every person in school is 
eligible to have his picture in the 
Nugget. There will be no group 
pictures in this years book and, 
therefore, the members of all fra- 
ternites, societies, and clubs must 
have individual pictures taken if 
they wish to appear with their group 
in the year book. 

Humphrey Saunders and his staff 
of assistants have already accomp- 
lished much toward their aim of 
making this years book the finest 
in the history of Colorado College. 

Pictures that are not taken at the 
Wagner-Fults studio, located on the 
fourth floor of the Burns Building, 
cannot be accepted for the Nugget. 



which the Texas cattlemen move< 
their cattle to the bases of the Con 
federate army. Later men trailec 
cattle from the Rio Grande to thi 
great Montana Basins for 65c ; 
head, a cost which today would no 
pay for their shipment by freigh 
from here to Denver. 

In 1867 the first cattle marke 
was established at Abilene, Kansas 
The following year it received som* 
67,000 head of Texac cattle. Fron 
this vicinity the Chislem trail, on( 
of the most famous of all catth 
trails, led southward to the Pan^ 
handle. There grew up much com^ 
petition among the towns for thi; 
business, and in some cases t h e 
trails were staked for as far a; 
ninety miles to guide the herder; 
to a particular community. T h e 
Texas-Montana trail, established ir 
1876 was the last of these trails. 
Dodge City, Kansas, which had the 
reputation of being the vwldesi 
town in the country during the 
twenty-five years of cattle trailing 
was situated on this trail. 

"In these days," Mr. Adams 
said, "the horse was the first re- 
quisite in trailing cattle. It was the 
motive power for the herd. It was 
the insurance policy of the herd's 
going through. Earnest Seaton 
Thompson said, 'A man can always 
learn something by listening to his 
dog.' I believe this is only more 
true of a horse. Range bred horses 
were the only ones we could use, 
thorobreds were impossible. Range 
horses seemed to know the cattle 
and could handle them almost 
without the men. Their only fear 
was of bears, and of them they had 
a deathly horror." 

"A cattle man starting out would 
first get the horses, then the men, 
and lastly the cattle. An outfit 
sisted of twelve men, a foreman, 
and a cook. An average herd num- 
bered between 2500 and 3500 
head, the size being determined by 
the ease with which the herd could 
be handled. Such a herd would 
fill Nevada Avenue for twelve 
blocks, supposing it to be twice as 
wide as it now is. Its daily drive 
would be 15 to 20 miles." 

Several humorous anecdotes and 
many of his own personal experi- 
ences were recounted by Mr. 
Adams, who recalled that today the 
only tangible evidences remaining of 
these old trails, with which he was 
so familiar, were those same o 1 d 
crooked streets of Boston. 



THE TIGER 



SOCIETY 



Contemporary Christinas Party 

A Christmas party was held at 
the Contemporary Club house, 
Tuesday, December 1 7. Mr. and 
Mrs. Jack Dern and Miss Catherine 
Hood chaperoned the affair. The 
guests were Elzie Winship, Char- 
lotte Pipkin, Suzanne Walker, Ma- 
rie Benning, Olive Bradley, Kath- 
ryn Sheafer, Lenore Benning, 
Eleanor Barnhart, Sally Oliver. 
Sam Vickerman, John Patterson, 
Cecil Bender, John Veeder, Dick 
Tubman, Carl Burke, Glen Murray, 
Arthur Baylis, Francis Robbins, 
Paul Conover, Franklin Emery, 
Walter Forslund, Harold Rea, Elvin 
Griffith, Don Shelton, Loren Chan- 
cy, Clark Schnorr, and Mr. Ansell. 

Miss Edith C. Bramhall visited in 
Chicago during Christmas vacation. 

Miss Virginia Dewey who has 
been ill for the past three weeks has 
returned to school. 

Mrs. Louise W. Fauteaux, dean 
of women, spent the Christmas holi- 
days in Denver. 

Dr. W. C. Binkley has returned 
from Durant, Tenn., where he spent 
Christmas vacation. 

Ruth Whitecraft Marries 

Announcement has been made of 
the marriage of Miss Ruth White- 
craft of Colorado Springs to Mr. 
Paul Phey of Edison, Colo. Miss 
Whitecraft is a graduate of Colo- 
rado College. The wedding took 
plrce on Saturday, December 28. 
Mr. and Mrs. Phey will be at home 
at Edison. 

Chapel Inn Dinner Dance 

Colorado College students who 
attended the Chapel Inn, last Fri- 
day evening included — Josephine 
Campbell, Alice Aaby, Jane White- 
craft, Lois Seebach, Vera Corlett, 
Margaret Gragg, Sarah Sheldon, 
Dorothy Faus, Beth Smith, Eliza- 
beth Crannell, Randalin Trippel, 
Katherine Sweet, Marion Young, 
Marks Jaillette, Charles Wilgus, 
Harry Matheson, William Fales, 
George Robinson, Harry Blunt, Al- 
bert Gieseck. 

Broadmoor Dinner Dance 

Among the guests at the Broad- 
moor dinner dance, last Saturday 
evening were: — Jane Lowell, Dor- 
othy Faus, Phyllis Ormsby, T. Er- 
nest Nowels, and Harold Harmon, 
all of whom are Colorado College 
students. 

Zetalethian Give Parlies 

Members and alumnae of Zetale 



thian society were guests at parties 
given by three former members of 
the socity, during Christmas vaca- 
tion. Miss Mary Kirby was hostess 
at a dinner at her home in Manitou 
on Thursday, January 2, and Miss 
Bessie Shepard entertained at a 
bridge tea on Saturday, December 
28. A waffle breakfast was held 
at the club hose in Sunday, Decem- 
ber 29. 

C. C. Bridge Luncheon 

A group of Colorado college 
students and alumnae in La Junta 
during Christmas vacation held a 
bridge luncheon at the Harvey 
House, Saturday, Dec, 28. Miss 
Amanda Ellis, Miss Hilda Burch, 
Mrss Hilda Burch, Mrs. H. B. Todd, 
Clydette Higgenbottom, Margaret 
Enyart, Elinor McCleary, Marian 
McCleary, Ruth Stevens, Katherine 
Powell,, Helen Hageman, Florus 
Thompson, and Louise Rice attend- 
ed the affair. 

A. A. U. W. Meet 

Local members of the American 
Association of University Women 
attended a meeting held m Bemis 
hall, Wednesday afternoon. The 
hostesses were, Mrs. Louise W. 
Fauteaux, Miss Edith C. Bramhall, 
Miss E. Louise Purves, Miss Dorothy 

D. Roberts, Miss Helen Vaughan, 
Miss Amanda Ellis, and Miss Alida 
Israel. Professor Ben Cherrington 
of Denver addressed the meeting on 
the subject of "A New Day in Inter- 
national Relations." 



Delta Alph Pledges Two 

The fraternity of Delta Alpha 
Phi announced the pledging of 
Sherburne Ayers of Littleton, and 
Raymond Pezoldt of Colorado 
Springs. 

Eulalia Speir Entertains 

Colorado College students who 
attended a bridge tea given by Miss 
Eulalia Spier, 1130 North Tejon 
street, Friday, January 2, included: 
Grace Perkins, Matilda Willis, Gen- 
evieve Engle, Lorna Dorlac, Jane 
Whitecraft, Eva Crowder, Virginia 
Easton, Beth Smith, Miss Spier, a 
former Colorado College student, is 
attending the University of Colo 
rado this year. 

Miss Davis Engaged 

Announcement has been made of 
the engagement of Miss Eleanor S. 
Davis and Mr. George E. Ehrman. 
Miss Davis is director of physical 
education for women at Colorado 
College, and Mr. Ehrman is a Colo- 
rado Springs business man. No date 
for the wedding has been set. 



Teaching Class Are Guests 

Members of the Practice teaching 
class were the guests of Dean and 
Mrs. Charlie B. Hershey at their 
home, Monday evening. Mr. and 
Mrs. H. H. Corning and Miss Lu- 
cille Dee Horton also attended the 
affair. The members of the class 
are Angeline Keen, Virginia Dew- 
ey, Alice Aaby, Eva Crowder, Jea- 
nette Cace, Florence Pickett, Mary 
McConnell, Elizabeth Hayden, Gen- 
evieve Curry, Imogene Miller, Dor- 
is Simmons, Frances Glau, Evelyn 
Stubblefield, Helen Hageman, Ei- 
leen Edmondson, Emmalou Mc- 
Broom, Nina Johnson, Louise Hil- 
ler, and Marjorie Barkley. 

C. C. Reception 

President and Mrs. C. C. Mie- 
row, Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Copeland, 
and Mrs. Louise Feauteaux attend- 
ed the annual Colorado College re- 
ception held at the home of Mr. 
Harold D. Roberts, $08, a trustee 
of the college, in Denver during the 
Christmas holidays. 

Copeland Named Judge 

Mr. William D. Copeland has 
been notified that he has been chos- 
en as the judge for the state of 
Colorado in the nation wide contest 
to decide the best radio announcer 
in the United States. The contest 
is sponsored by the American Acad- 
emy of Arts and Letters, in an at- 
tempt to stimulate interest in better 
speech. 

Hamlin Garland, well known 
writer, is the chairman in charge of 
the arrangements. Judges will lis- 
ten in from every state in the 
Union, and will send their votes in 
by April 1 . President Hoover will 
present the winner with a gold med- 
al on April 15. 



Stewart Wilson, president of the 
Associated Students, has gone to 
San Francisco to attend the annual 
meeting of the American Federa- 
tion of Student Body Presidents 
which was held last week in t h e 
California city. 

While attending the meeting our 
president will no doubt get some 
new ideas about student govern- 
ment which will apply to our own 
particular case. He is expected to 
return about January 10 and will 
bring a full report of the business 
proceedings, of the meeting and of 
his trip back with him. 

ETA SIGMA PHI 

Eta Sigma Phi, national classical 
fraternity, announces the inniation 
of Helen Nelson and Helen Hultman 
on Tuesday, January 7. Alious 
Rockett and Stewart Wilson will be 
initiated in the near future. 



FRANK SARLAS & CO. 

Shoe Shining and Repairing 

Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Quick Service 

132 E. Pikes Peak 



Oouture's 

French Cleaning and Dyeing Co. 

Phones 1288-1289 
218 N. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 



tsOMtUk 




TENT €^ AWNING CO. 



Awnings and Camp Supplies 



PLAZA HOTEL BEAUTY SHOP 

Finger wave — Marcels 

Permanent Wave* 
Phone Main 2515 



for hot, clean 

clinkerless fuel 

— call the "coal phone' 

M 577 




lEW 
COAL/ 



DUTCH 



(Hammond) for new driver- 
ess cars. 

New Fords 7c per mile; 
30c per hour. 

New Cheve Six's 8c per mile 
35c per hour. 

Office 

ELK HOTEL 1 

Phones M. 346 and 2065 
Free Delivery 



THE TIGER 



ISAAC BROTHERS 

WATCHMAKERS and JEWELERS 

32 East Bijou Street 



Go To 

Miller Music ep. 

"Where Music Is Sweetest" 
13 North Tejon Street 
for Records and Music 

GEORGE L. MILLER, Prop. 



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Bums Theatre BIdg. 
Exclusive Photographers for the 

PIKES PEAK NUGGET 



Good Plumbing and Heating 

Get an estimate on your next job 

J. C.ST. JOHN 

PLUMBING & HEATING COMPANY 

226 N. Tejon St. ^^AKER M. 48 



lAKER 
Automatic Oil 
URNER 



SUPERIOR 

Dry Cleaning Co. 

Telephone 1364 129 N. Tejon 



Write your friends on 

Crested 
Stationery 

Murray's have a complete line of station- 
ery with the Crest of your Fraternity or of 
the College. 

TheJvIURRAY 
Drug Co. 

Across from the Campus 



■ ■»..»..«..«M»..t..>..«.l». t H ,,| 

■•« " » " »ii»-«'i»' H ii. " « " l'-«ii»ii» " » 



CLARK CENTRAL FIGURE 
IN ANNUAL FRISCO GAME 

Fans Anxiously Watch Touted Tig- 
er Ace; Coast Players Name 
Dutchman as Super-Player 



■** 



You will Look and Feel Better 
after seeing us. 

Elk Barber Shop 

122 East Pikes Peak 



By Barratt O'Hara 

Sixty thousand persons, eight 
tinrjes as many as the capacity of 
Washburn Field, were jammed into 
Kezar stadium in San Francisco on 
the first afternoon of this year to 
witness the fifth annual East-West 
gridiron controversy. 

Phil Clay, '29, and myself arrived 
early at the park. Around us 
people were scanning programmes 
and consulting the latest editions of 
the newspapers for the final dope 
on the combat. Then came the 
forty-four picked pigskin warriors 
of the country out onto the battle 
ground. There was much yelling 
and cheering. But as the spectators 
resumed their seats, murmers could 
be heard from every section of that 
great concrete oval, and they all 
were asking, "Which is Clark?" 
Then the referee called the captains 
out to decide the toss, and as Clark 
walked out as the captain of the 
West, everyone was telling his 
neighbor, "Watch him, "that's 
Clark!" 

Then the game ended, and as we 
were pushing towards the exits we 
would hear one man asking his com- 
panion, "Well, what was the best 
part of the game?" Unanimously, 
the reply would be, "That fellow 
Clark's shifty running!" 



T. J. Collier T. M. Colliei 

V. L. Collier 

TheCOLUER 

LUMBER CO. 

Phone Main 386 
543 W. Colorado Ave. 



Short Story Prize is 
Donated by Houserman 

The fifty dollar prize offered by 
John Hauserman, Jr., for the best 
short story written by a Colorado 
College student has been deposited 
at the treasures's office. The com- 
mittee of judges, who include Dr. 
Milton Rose, Miss Amenda M. Ellis, 
and Dr. Lloyd Shaw, will meet soon 
to formulate rules for the contest. 



Student Covers All 
Star Game For Gazette 

The fifth annual New Year's Daj 
all-star East-West game in San 
Francisco way covered for thf 
Gazette and Telegra/ih by Richard 
Vanderhoof. 

Vanderhoof made ihe trip witt 
Dutch Clark and the West team, 
sending exclusive dail> stories to the 
Colorado Springs papei. 

Other C. C. students or alumni, 
witnessing the classic game ii eluded 
Fiank Tait Lewis, Phiup Tuggle 
Clay, and Barratt O'Hara. 



EAT 'EM UP TIGERS 

Then come down and eat 
that tasty 
Confection 

AL'S FRENCH 
FRIED POPCORN 

114 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 



PAUDRE-PAUFFE 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Permanent Finger and Water 

Waving 

Manicure and Scalp Treatments 

Marcels 50c. 



The Trip that Bankrupts the 
English Language 

CORLEY 

Mt. Highway 

Cripple Creek in high gear 



LOOK YOURBESl 

Have your hair cut in the 
approved manner. 

Pete's Barber Shop 

8 E. Cucharras St. 



HUGHES' 
CHOCOLATES 

Try our Saturday 
SPECIALS 



THE TIGER 



COVERS 
ALL THE FIELD 



SPORTS 



BASKETBALL 
CROSS COUNTRY EQUITATION 




REID 



Under New Management 

The College 
Barber Shop 

Ralph Schildknecht, Proprietor 

103 E. Cache la Poudre 
Colorado Springs 



Quality 

Cleaners and Dyers 

SUITS, O'COATS 

HATS $1.25 

U-Fone 1-8-1-1 We'll Call 

H. A. Thompson 
10 E. Kiowa 



WHY NOT 

Learn Typewriting 
while attending Col- 
lege? Your teachers 
will appreciate type- 
written work to be 
checked. We can ar- 
range hours to suit 
your convenience. 












^\\^^!is\ 



WATERS 




INGRAHAM 




HINKLEY 




KANSAS AGGIES DOWN 
FIGHTING TIGER FIVE 



Playing without their wizard and 
captain Earl "Dutch" Clark the first 
night, and not being able to func- 
tion properly the second, the Colo- 
rado College Tigers lost two succes- 
sive games to the Kansas Aggies last 
Friday and Saturday nights at the 
City Auditorium by scores of 53-34 
and 35-28. 

The Aggies seemed to have an 
uncanny ability to crack baskets 
from any angle on the floor and 
sunk many long ones that helped 
raise their tally. Silverwood, star 
Kansas forward, was the Aggies' 
main threat and ihigh score man, 
scormg many long and short shots. 
Although their defense was com- 
paratively good, the Tigers' offense 
seemed weak at times, and the Ben- 
gals were too busy trying to pass the 
ball in close for "set-up" shots in- 
stead of taking their opportunities 
from a little longer range. The two 
games might have both been differ- 
ent stories if the Black and Gold 
basketeers had been able to score 
the same percentage of free throws 
that the Corn growers did. The 
Tigers also missed many set-ups 
probably would have told a differ- 
ent story of the final autcome. 

Coach Olie Herigstad has built a 
formidable combination this year 
around "Dutch" Clark. With Doyle 
and the diminutive Ernie Waters ai 
forwards and Juan Reid and Stan 
Ryerson at guards, and the "Flying 
Dutchman" at center, Herigstad has 
a quintet which should go far to- 
ward determining the resting place 
c^ the eastern championship of the 
Rocky Mountain region. He also 
has such men as Hinkley and Ingra- 
ham, last year's regulars. Fries. Slo- 
cum, and Owen's as ready subati- 
utes. 



Lose To Greeley 
In Season Opener 

Flashing a fast offense that 
swamped the Tigers in the first two 
periods of play. The Greeley Bears 
defeated the Colorado College 
basketball team by a score of 31 to 
25. The Bears led by a large mar- 
gin at the (half, but the Tigers drew 
up on them in the later periods al- 
though they never headed them. 

The Tiger team was deciddely off 
form. Doyle and Ryerson showed 
nervousness in the early periods and 
were replaced by Ingraham and 
Hinkley. In the second half, they 
returned to show a brillant offense. 
Waters, dimutive Tiger forward, 
was ejected from the game on fouls. 
Clark was not up to top notch form, 
and Ried was deciddly off form in 
all periods of the game. 



Tigers Meet Tartar in 
Western This Evening 

Crv.nt.inne<l from page 3) 

Downs, all-conference player of 
last year, heads the line-up for the 
invaders. Besse, Rickert, and Hy- 
inkle are others that have good 
chances of starting in the game. 

When Coach Burt Potter, of the 
Pioneers, says that Western State 
has one of the best teams that he 
has seen in years, with good floor 
work and accurate shooting — it 
may be gathered that the Tigers 
are going to have their hands full 
tonight. 



The Tigers open their home con- 
lerence schedule here Friday and 
Saturday nights at the Auditorium 
against Western State College. The 
Mountaineers' engagements will be 
no easy matter for they have al- 
ready split a double-header arrange- 
ment with Denver University last 
I Friday and Saturday nights. 



COLORADO COLLEGE BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

Season— 1930 

Date Opponent Place 

Jan. 10, Fri Western State Colorado Springs 

Jan. II, Sat Western State Colorado Springs 

Jan. 18, Sat Denver University Colorado Springs 

Jan. 21, Tues De Paul University Colorado Springs 

Jan. 28, Tues Teachers Colorado Springs 

Jan. 31, Fri Colorado Aggies Colorado Springs 

Feb. I, Sat Wyoming University Colorado Springs 

Feb. 8. Sat Denver University Efenver 

Feb. 1 4, Fri Mines Golden 

Feb. 15, Sat Mines Colorado Springs 

Feb. 21, Fri Colorado Aggies Fort Collins 

Feb. 22, Sat Wyoming University Laramie 

Feb. 28, Fri Colorado University Boulder 

Mar. I , Sat Colorado University Colorado Springs 



10 



THE TIGER 



We Make a Specialty of 

CLEANING AND DYEING MEN'S 

AND WOMEN'S SHOES 

GOLDEN CYCLE SHINE PARLOR 

Todd Colbert 

Lobby Golden Cycle Bldg. 
Tejon and Pikes Peak 



This week's Candy Special 



Bitter 
Sweets 



40c lb, 



Barthel'S 

Tejon Street at 
Acacia Park Corner 



AMERICA 

SATURDAY FOR 4 DAYS 



AU 
Talking 




Three outlaws, lost in the burning 
wastes of Death Valley with a new- 
born babe. WHAT DRAMA! See 
how it worked out in this outdoor 
classic — this picture that will give 
you the dramatic thrill that cheers. 
IT'S WONDERFUL. COME!! 

"SUNNY SIDE UP" 
Coming Jan. 18 




S ervices f o r your 
car that includes 

Proper Lubrication 

100% Alemite 

LEADING MOTOR OILS 

Weaverized Washing 

Tire Repairing Road Service 

Drive in Today 



FIRESTONE TIRES 
117 N. Nevada Phone M. 202 



Van De Graaff Coached 
Rocky Mountain Team 

The Rocky Mountain Conference 
selected its first all-star team for 
inter-conference competition during 
the past season, and played its first 
inter-sectional game with a picked 
troop from the North Central Con- 
ference at Denver New Year's Day, 
under the auspices of the Elks Club 
charity. The game was close and 
hard, and played on the solid fun- 
damentals of football and while the 
guests from northeast won by a 
score of 13 to 7, the showing of 
the Rocky Mountain team was 
strong enough to distinctly raise the 
prestige of western football in the 
national eye. 

The Tigers were represented in 
this game by Coaoh Van de Graaff, 
who acted as head line coach, and 
by Charles McGrory and Leon Star- 
buck, as guard and tackle respec- 
tively. Hap was a regular lines- 
man for the R. M. C. until a small 
wound in his arm became infected 
to such an extent that he had to 
abandon practice a week before the 
game. He still favors that arm. 
McGrory, however, was able to gain 
a berth at left guard on the for- 
ward chain of the Rocky Moun- 
taineers. Some of the disadvan- 
tages of the R. M. C. team was in 
the fact that they were outweighed 
seven pounds to the man but the 
stone crushing machine in the N. C. 
C. backfield was their strong card 
against the lighter, faster line. 



Douglas' Chemistry 

Class Visits Portland 



Professor F. W. Douglas took his 
class in Industrial Chemistry to visit 
plants in Canon City and Portland 
on Tuesday. The members of the 
class include Alida Isreal, Vara Pat- 
terson, Lois Brown, Eleanor Tre- 
mayne, George Robinson. Jerry 
Cogan, John Cogan, Charles Cogan, 
Clayton Wynn, and Dale Merritt. 

CURTIS MEMBER OF THE 
INSTITUTE OF RADIO 



News has been received of the 
election of Mr. Westley F. Curtis 
to membership in The Institute of 
Radio Engineers. Mr. Curtis grad- 
uated with a major in physics at 
Colorado College in 1928 and was 
quite active in debating, being cap- 
tain of the debating team for one 
season. After graduation he was 
employed for several months in the 
physical laboratory of the Westing- 
house Electric Co. at Pittsburg, Pa., 
and then was appointed Junior 
Physicist at the Naval Research 
Laboratory in Washington, D. C. 
where he is now employed. He has 
been granted one patent and has 
applied for several more on fre- 
quency division circuits. 



Hour Glass 



Jan. 9, 1901 — 

The annual musical given by the 
Minerva Society is one of the chief 
social events of the College year, 
The young ladies have won an en- 
viable reputation as entertainers, 
and fortunate, indeed are those who 
receive an invitation to their musi- 

A number of Montgomery Hall 
girls enjoyed a delightful Moonlight 
Party to Seven Falls Saturday 
night. 

The Junior Class is agitating a 
"Junior Prom." Many of the stu- 
dents feel that such an event would 
be a great advance in the social 
life of the school. 
Jan. 16, 1901 — 

The Freshman Class held a class 
meeting last Monday to decide 
whether they were important 
enough to have their pictures i n 
the College Annual or not. 

The basketball players are going 
to begm practicing Wednesday af- 
ternoon. If the girls work hard 
enough there will probably be two 
outside games — Fort Colhns and 
Boulder. 
Jan. 23, 1901 — 

There was much interest in the 
basketball game on Saturday. The 
Senior-Soph team scored 2 against 
the Junior-Frosh team. 
Jan. 8, 1902— 

The young ladies of the College 
were at home New Year's Day to 
their friends at South Hall. All 
were in Colonial costume and were 
charming hostesses. 



"Hell's Heroes" Shows 
At America on Tuesday 

"Hell's Heroes," iJniversal's re- 
markable all-talking drama of 
human nature which will come to 
the America Theatre, Jan. 11, 12, 
13, and 14 is a picture of a high 
and distinguished order. 

It runs the gamut of human emo- 
tions and actions. It has romance, 
adventure, pathos and humor. It 
achives suspense of a nature that 
has never been surpassed in motion 
pictures. 

Its action is Sihown against a can- 
vass at once weird and awe-inspir- 
ing — the majestic, illimitable deso- 
lation of the great Mojave Desert. 
Against this tremendous background 
is played out a human drama whose 
compelling interest is never allowed 
to flag. 

"Hell's Heroes" is marked by 
superb acting. Charles Bickford, 
Raymond Hatton and Fred Kohler 
give characterizations that are not- 
able contributions to the art of the 
screen. Splendid performances al- 
so are given by Fritzi Ridgeway, 
Maria Alba, Joe de la Cruz, Buck 
Connors and Walter James. 




^^ 



r^SAUNDERS 



Drive It Yourself 



SYSTEM 



Fords — Desotos — Chryslers 

D. C. HUTCHINS, Mgr. 

Phone Main 1800 

21 No. Cascade 



RIALTO 

STARTS SATURDAY 

CONRAD 
NAGEL 
PAULINE 
FREDERICK 
LILA LEE 



"THE SACRED 
FLAME" 

All talking Romance 
from Somerset Maugh- 
am's Famous story. 

HEAR 

CONRAD 

NAGEL 

SING 



THE J. S. BROWN 

MERCANTILE 

COMPANY 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



BUSY CORNER 
SHOE SHOP 

Shines — Shoe Repairs 
And Hats Blocked 



E. L. Bruce 

BARBER SHOP 

28 E. Kiowa 



THE TIGER 



11 



k SERVICE 
for Every Purse 



THE 
PEARL LAUNDRY 



— « 



"It Pays To Look Well" 

Alamo Hotel 

BARBER AND BEAUTY SHOP 

R. W. Counts, Prop. 
Phone Main 1255-W 124 S. Tejor 



BUICK AND MARQUETTE 
MOTOR CARS 

Strang's 



Harry D. MacDonald 
President 



Made in Colorado Springs 

VAN BRIGLE 
ART POTTERY 

The world's most famous 
art pottery. 

Visitors always welcome. 




30 N. Tejon 



Phone M. 214 



Phone Main 1710 

TDEAL 

1 CLEANERS 

5 West Colorado Ave. 



Valetor Pressing Service 



STUDENT PASSES BY GIRL OF HIS 
DREAM FOR FRECKLED MARY BROWN 

Authors write about her, artists paint her, troubadours sing of her. 
She is glorified in every way. Every man adores l^er, longs for her, ai.d 
looks everywhere for her — The Dream Girl. 

It is a difficult task to qualify her. Of course all Dream Girls are 
handsome. One may be beautiful in the manner of a pink and gold 
sunset, with eyes blue as Venetian skys, cheeks like the proverbial rose, 
and with cherry-red lips. Another is a dark-skinned daughter wiih eyes 
sparklingly black, and hair as 



smooth as polished ebony. She is 
tall and willowy not small and dain- 
ty. At any rate we should concede 
her beauty. 

Then she should have the perfect 
personality. Hard to anger and 
quick to forgive. Neither a spend- 
thrift nor a miser, just conservative. 
Not impulsive but generous. Proud 
she should be but not haughty. She 
should be observing but not inquis- 
itive. Aggressive not commanding. 
Not curious but discreet. Her emo- 
tions she should be able to hide 
well. Revenge to her would be un- 
known, unfairness inconceivable. 
Faithful she shooild be and true and 
kind. Intelligent, but not too clev- 
er. That is not as clever as her hus- 
band professes to be. Yes, all these 
our idol would have — and more. 

She would be a wonderful house- 
keeper. A superb cook. At any 
rate she should know whether to 
add the milk or the tomatoes first 
to tomato soup to prevent it curd- 
ling. She should be a musician so 
she could amuse one in the leisure 
hours. She should be fond of chil- 
dren and have the qualities which 
c,ttract them. She should be fond 
of sports and able to play a good 
gc.me of golf, tennis or anythmg 
her husband chooses. At bridge she 
should be a wizard, never trump 
her partner's ace nor fail to return 
his first lead. She must be a won- 
derful dancer, capable of taking a 
clothing store dummy and making 
h'm hok like a first class giglio. 
At shows she should not laugh at the 
wrong time nor talk during the per- 
formance. She should never have 
to reduce and hence, could eat 
everything. Heaven forbid that 
she should always order fruit salad 
for lunch and shrimp for dinner, 
likewise "nighty-night" and "all- 
righty" would be foreign to iher vo- 
c bulary. Oh, our ideal would be 
perfect. 

As to her morals, they would be 
the essence of conformity. She'd 
never drink, nor smoke, nor swear. 
Church to her would be a place to 
go on Sundays not just to mar- 
r age-< and funerals. She wooild 
know the Bible by heart not just the 
shortest verse. Or she'd — 

But why continue? Lei me sug- 
gest men that if ever you happen 
to find such a creature — KILL 



HER. She's too good to live. Then 
forget this foolishness and go mar- 
ry little Mary Brown who's got frec- 
kles on her nose, is curious as the 
dickens, dances like a cooktable 
and says "all-righty," who can help 
you out when you pound your fin- 
ger with the hammer, and it will 
be a perfect match and you will 
"live happily ever after." 



C. C. Graduates 
Offered Awards 
By Many Schools 

That Colorado College students 
compare favorably with those of 
other schools in the country is prov- 
en by the many fellowships, assist- 
antships, and scholarships that are 
offered here from other institutions 
this year. The high standards of 
work done in the past by graduates 
from this college is in itself a trib- 
ute to their preparatory work com- 
pleted at Colorado College. 

Thus far this semester, fellow- 
ships have been received from large 
universities in all parts of the coun- 
try including Bryn Mawr College, 
the University of Missouri, the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, Tufts College, 
Yale Universities, and many other 
universities. These range in value 
from $250 to $1200 a year and tu- 
ition, giving excellent opportunities 
for graduate work at a very low 
cost. 

The schools offering assistant- 
ship give the student a chance to 
carry on graduate work and at the 
same time aid in teaching in the in- 
stitution. Some of the scholarships 
are especially interesting to those 
concerned in research work. 

The Tufts College Fellowship is 
well-known at Colorado College as 
it has been won twice in the past 
three years by Colorado College 
women. This is a very valuable op- 
portunity for further study in the 
field of Economics. 

Notices and bulletins of these 
awards will be posted on the fac- 
ulty bulletin board in the Library 
to give the students a better chance 
to acquaint themselves with the par- 
ticulars. Any special awards will 
be listed in the Tiger. Application 
blanks and other information may 
be obtained from Dean Hershey. 



THE 

WHITE WAY 

SYSTEM 

Open Until 2 A. H. 

Try our delicious White 
Way Chili 

11 N. Tejon St. 



II 



OWARD'S 

BARBER 
SHOP 



19 East Bijou Street 



The Colorado Planing 
Mill Co. 

MILL WORK OF ALL 
DESCRIPTIONS 

PADDLES 
Frank Mitchell, Manager 

Rhone 2876-W 
525 W. Colorado Ave. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



CITY COAL 

15 East Pikes Peak Avenue 

Phone 

Main 67 or 120 



The Ice Cream 
that's a C. C. 
"Institution" 

The between Class "Cones", 
I h e sandwich materials and 
candy, the ice creams and ices 
for class and club functions. 

From Frosh to Grad it's t h e 
place every Tiger knows. 

MOWRY'S 

Across from Campus 

Main 1183. 1184 



m^ 



¥f^fff^ 



^mmilimmmfimmi: 





mericas Qredtest Pleasure F^esort 



DINNER AND DANCING 

Every Saturday from Eight to Twelve 
Dinner $2.50, no cover charge 



^ 



Cover charge $2 per couple 
from 9 p. m. on 

Wonderful Indoor Swimming Pool 

Now equipped with chlorine filter 
water absolutely pure 



fijiiii™^^^^^^ 



I 



"^i^. 




9bc Colorado College ^,^ 

I'fllir ..dll'""b 





VOLUME XXXII 
Number 15 



Official Students Publication 

January 17, 1930 



^, ;;;;;;;;;;; 



IMIirMIIIMIJIIIINIIIIIIMIMIIIMIIIIIIII 



l«iffi(SSiSiii!illiili)i«l)(!HiSi!!lll!lSS«S!SSS«ii! 



IIIMIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIII 



IIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlrlllJIIiriJIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIi' 



"Junior Farce Leads 




Maxine Moore 



Geraldine Williams 

(,See page 3) 



Genevieve Engel 



MIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIII 






Office of Publication: 23 Weit Colorado Ave., Colorado Spring!, Colo. 



THE TIGER 



^ 



-=^ 



Underwood Typewriters 

Exclusive agents for the Underwood type- 
writer including the Under\vood noiseless. 

Supplies— Wholesale and Retail 

Expert Repairing— Typewriters and Adding Machines 

.^— RENTALS — — 



A. L. STARK 

831 N. Tejon 



Typewriter Exchange 

Main 4670-4671 



SPECIAL EVENING DINNERS 

From 6 to 7:30 P. M. 

35c The COLLEGE INN 35c 



PicclyJ^igcly 



ALL OVER THE WORLD 

FIVE BUSY STORES IN 

COLORADO SPRINGS 



Write your friends on 

Crested 
Stationery 

Murray's have a complete line of station- 
ery with the Crest of your Fraternity or of 
the College. 

TheM^RRAY 

Drug Co. 

Across from the Campus 



Knorr's Market 

FOR YOUR PARTIES OR PICNICS 



Let us supply you with 
good things to eat 



123 North Tejon 



Phone 2602 




ypes 



Q^Early Englishy^ 
C as I on 

The Dentan 

/^RINTING 

cF Co. 






Coloj-ado 
Springs 



Issued Friday of each week. Entered at the Post Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter. 



VOLUME XXXII 



(THE9 TIGER 



Colorado College Weekly News Magazine 



Number 15 



DENVER HERE TO ROUTE 
THE TIGER SUPREMACY 



The dopester has a trip through 
the quicksand to pick the probable 
top dog in the floor battle with Den- 
ver this Saturday. They stand 
about level when viewed from the 
standpoint of their showing with the 
Mountaineers, whom they both have 
played already, but the weight of 
that comparison is exploded by the 
fact that one of the games down 
in the City Aud was as a blind snail, 
and that the two Gunnison stars, 
Davis and Hynke, were permitted 
to play against Denver and not 
against Colorado. 

In comparing styles of play the 
generous Denver scouts are reported 
to have given C. C. advance credit 
for a fast, desparate game, but los- 
ing. Denver takes the proper at- 
titude in being confident of their 
ability to win — counting also to 
their disadvantage the ephemeral 
jinx the Pikes Peak party has over 
them. 

The Tiger squad is at least as 
optimistic as their weekend guests, 
although not nearly so superstitious. 
Captain Clark has recovered his 
eye for baskets, as was shown by 
some of his long dribbling shots of 
thrilling memory last Saturday. The 
threatening shadow of inelegibility 
which hung over Ryerson a week 
ago seems to have been dispelled, 
and bigraham has come to a peak 
of play that his trick knee does not 
hamper, nor can the opponents 
block it. With these improvements 
in individual prospects over those 
of a week ago, and the other re- 
g '.iars, Reid, Hinkley, Waters, and 
Doyle, the Tigers can well expect 
to flip them through the curtained 
circlet for a consistent lead in a 
high-scoring game. 



Perkinson Plays Lead 
In German Club Drama 



Members of the German Club met 
in Ticknor Study Wednesday even- 
ing, and presented a complete Ger- 
man program. Roland Anderson's 
subject was "Schiller"; Dale Mer- 
rill told of Wilhelm Tell; and Gale 
Dein and Reginald Davis sang a 
duet. A play, "Die Burgschast", 
was acted in panlomine with Bob 
Lackey, John Cogan, Jerry Cogan 
and Mark Perkinson acting the 
parts, and Win Crouch reading the 
play. Mrs. Anna Sutton is the 
sponsor of the club. 



Horan Chosen To 
Lead Frosh Women 



The proposed amendment to the 
constitution of the Associated Wom- 
en Students that the freshmen wom- 
en elect a representative to the stu- 
dent council was voted upon and 
passed by a large majority, at the 
assembly of women students in Per- 
kin's Hall, Thursday, January 16. 
Jean Horan was elected by the 
Freshmen women for their student 
government board representative. 

Mrs. George Shaw, a graduate 
of Colorado College spoke to t h e 
assembly on "Our Island of Educa- 
tion." Mrs. Shaw emphasized the 
importance of continuing education 
after the first sixteen years of 
academic work are completed. "The 
Island of Education" is that limited 
information of facts which deals di- 
rectly with that civilization around 
the Mediterranean. American 
schools teach French and Romance 
Languages, the history of Greece 
and Rome, Grecian art and paint- 
ing; the principles of the Italian Re- 
nassiance; English History only af- 
ter southern civilization has con- 
quered the islands. In doing this, 
the Norse, Scandinavian, and other 
northern backgrounds which made 
the English race are forgotten. 
There is a great wealth of marvel- 
ous information about these ances- 
tors of curs which is far more vital 
to our race than that Island of the 
Mediterranean. Until educators 
find out the secrets of this ancient 
race, and delve into the secrets 
learned by the Indians, those people 
who really belong to this country, 
the American people cannot hope 
to truly adjust themselves to this 
huge land. 

Ethel Smith gave a piano solo 
and Rebecca Todd, accompanied 
by Helen Hummel, played a violin 
solo to conclude the meeting. 



Broks A. Brice, a graduate of C. 
C. doing research work in Physics 
at New York University, has just 
announced his discovery of a new 
ultra-violet band spectrum of hydro- 
gen chloride. Brice is at N. Y. U. 
on a research fellowship working for 
his Doctors degree. 



HINKLEY AND ENGEL PRODUCE 
A LAUGH A MINUTE IN FARCE 



By Tom Tate 
Last night marked the opening of the Juniors annual farce "What 
Happened To Jones" — which proved to be a remarkably funny play in 
which things happen, with the exception of the first few minutes of the 
first act, and they keep on happening with con- 
siderable rapidity, so that the eye is held even 
if the emotions are not. 

A good way to make up a readable review 
of a play is to quote some of the gags and comic 
situations from it. "When "What Happened To 
Jones," directed by Arthur Sharp and starring 
Bill Hinkley as "Jones," was announced, I 
thought: "Well, heigh-ho! There's a review as 
good as written. Just pick out eight or ten fun- 
ny lines and situations from the play, put a head 
over it and let it go at that. Those boys ought to come across with 
something pretty comical." So sharpened a pencil and took along an 
old bill to write on and went to "What Happened To Jones." 

Well, sir, I got to laughi 




Bill Hinkley 



First Frosh To Ring 

Bell Gets Publicity 

Hartley Murray, Fred Nichols, 
Bill Baker, and Gene Lague were 
in a tie to be the first one to ring 



This will inaugurate a 
new Tiger rule. Hence- 
forth, The Tiger will pub- 
lish the name of that 
member of the freshman 
class who first rings the 
Cutler bell after an ath- 
lectic victory. Look in 
this space in future issues 
to discover who are the 
more active members of 
the frosh class. — The 
Editor. 



my- 
self as soon as the first act got un- 
der way, and from then on my be- 



According to "Doc" Van- 
derhoof, manager of the Jun- 
ior Farce, a small number of 
seats are still available for the 
play tonight. They may be 
secured at the box office at 
the Little Theatre this eve- 
ning. As no seats are re- 
served, these tickets will give 
their purchasers just as good 
seats as those which were 
bought in advance. 



bell after last Saturday's 
game against Western 



the Cutler 
basketball 
Slate. 

Each of them, when interviewed 
this morning in respect to their be- 
ing the first again tomorrow eve- 
ning, prophesied that he would be 
the first. Rumours, however, pre- 
dict that a dark horse from Nevada 
Avenue is planning to capture the 
blue ribbon. 



Shakespeare Players Will Be In Denver 



The Stratford Upon-Avon Fest- 
ival Company will appear in Shake- 
speare Repertory at the Broadway 
Theatre in Denver for five days be- j year, 
ginning Tuesday, January 21. This 



company presented two of Shake- 
speare's plays in Colorado Springs 
last year, but will not stop here this 



havior was a matter for comment. 
I lost my pencil very early in the 
game and, even if I had had it, I 
wouldn't .have known what to do 
with it. I didn't care whether I was 
reviewing for the "Tiger" or the 

(ContiniK.i on pa-,- .() 



Ten Men Make Squad 

In Debate Tryouts 

Men's debate tryouts were held 
in Palmer Pit at 4 o'clock, Monday 
afternoon. Jan. 13. The men now 
on the squad are Nelson Brown, 
Arthur Bayliss (Debate Manager). 
Roland Anderson, Bert Vandervliet, 
Clifford Vessey. Edgar Gregory, 
John Bennett, W. M. Metzler. 
John Kurrie, and James Dodson. 

The question to be debated is 
"Resolved that the Nations Should 
Adopt a Plan of Complete Disarma- 
ment Except that Which is Neces- 
sary for Police Purposes." There 
is still a chance for others to try 
out. Those desiring to try for the 
squad should see Mr. Copeland and 
arrange for a date. 



THE TI6EE 




Ti^er Special Oxfords 

in $7.50 and $8.50 values can be bought for 

$5.95 

right now — at Vorhes annual 
Clearance Sale 

Values equally as good in newest footwear 
for Women. 




"S HOES ahp HOSIERY - 

12 S TEIJON ST. 



TOR YOUR CONVENIENCE" 

We Dry Clean 

'Phone us first" 




M. 2958 



Gents' 

Hats 

Topcoats 

Tuxedos 

Gloves 

Ties 

Etc. 
Sweaters 



WAGNER-FULTS STUDIO 

Burns Theatre BIdg. 
Exclusive Photographers for the 

PIKES PEAK NUGGET 



SUPERIOR 

Dry Cleaning Co. 

Telephone 1364 129 N. Tejon 



Good Plumbing and Heating 

Get an estimate on your next job 

J. C.ST. JOHN 

PLUMBING W HEATING COMPANY 

226 N. Tejon St. BEAKER M. 48 



AKER 

Automatic Oil 
URNER 



McClintock Elected To 
Position In Red Cross 



James K. McClintock, a gradu- 
ate of Colorado College, was re- 
cently appointed to one of the high- 
est offices of the American Red 
Cross. McClintock was elected 
Vice Chairman in Charge of Fi- 
nance. 

James L. Fieser, National Vice 
Chairman, in a recent letter to all 
Chapter Chairmen of the Red Cross 
spoke highly of the work of our 
C. C. rlumnus, McChntock. He 
srid: Mr. McClintock's long service 
in the Red Cross and his familiarity 
with and responsibility for Red 
Cross financial operations, has 
errncd for him his new designation. 

Much. Good Farce 
In Junior Farce 



CConttnued from page 3) 

Police Gazette. All I knew was that 
I didn't want to take time out to 
mark down things on paper for you 
to read. You can't, laugh and 
write too, and my choice turned out 
to be laughing. 

I will say, in my reportorial ca- 
pacity, that "What Happened To 
Jones," under Arthur Sharp's direc- 
tion, has a swell cast. Bill Hinkley 
as "Jones" showed well as the slick 
traveling salesman for playing 
cards and hymn books who through 
his own strategy became safe from 
the police by masquerading as a 
bishop and falling in love with the 
bishop's brother's daughter. Max- 
ine Moore (the Professor's ward) 
shares honors with Hinkley, giving 
a very satisfactory performance in 
the role of "Cissy." She is an 
adept actress and has a very charm- 
ing stage personality. Genevieve 
Engel in the character of "Helma," 
the dumb maid, gives a very funny 
touch to the piece. Humphrey 
Saunders in enacting the true 
"Bishop of Ballarat" is truly well 
cast for his part. Geraldine Wil- 
liams portrays the role of "Levina," 
the Bishop's "inamorta," by corre- 
spondence, in a very pleasing man- 
ner. Duke Tucker as "Richard" is 
natural and clever in handling that 
part. John Thurston gives a re- 
remarkable portrayal as the mad- 
man, escaped from the Sanitorium 
and also in the guise of a hard- 
boiled policeman. 

I am sorry about not being able 
to report even one of the laughable 
remarks in "What Happened To 
Jones." Really I did lose my pen- 
cil. (Oh, don't bother! It was an 
old one and horribly short). But, 
if you don't see the show for your- 
self — and tonight is the last per- 
formance — you are a madman, 
that's all. 




Here's Your 

VICTOR 
RECORD 



RADIO 



Come in and hea 
the latest releases ii 
anr ventilated tria 



fi)GGrl 



GGrlGSS 



"kT^'nTwr^k' H FVRNITVRE ZV. 

113-115 N. Tejon 



E. L. Bruce 

BARBER SHOP 

28 E.Kiowa 



Frank Geddy Says— 

The pep at the last basketball 
game wasn't what it should 
be — how about it? — more 
pep at the D. U. game. 

The Shoe Shop 

Across from the High School 



We Make a Specialty of 

CLEANING AND DYEING MEN'S 

AND WOMEN'S SHOES 

GOLDEN CYCLE SHINEPARLOn 

Todd Colbert 

Lobby Golden Cycle Bldg. 
Tejon and Pikes Peak 



HOLLY SUGAR 

is 
the Best 

Sugar the essential food. 

HOLLY SUGAR 
CORPORATION 



PLAZA 

DINING 
ROOM 

"The Place to Eat" 

Breakfast Luncheon 

Dinner 



THE TIGER 



Photographs of our Colorado 
mountains. Nicely made — 
attractively colored by hand. 
Moderate in price — framed 
or unframed. 

H. L. STANDLEY 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs 



CADILLAC 

and 

CHRYSLER 

MOTORCARS 

Adams Motor Co. 

Marksheffel Building 



Hey-Service 

The 
HEYSE SHEET 
METAL WORKS 

INC. 

219 N.Weber 
Main 552 



W. I. Lucas 

HAS 

EVERYTHING IN 

SPORTING GOODS 
"Tigers always welcome" 

119 N. Tejon St. 
Main 900 



Wben you consider that you 
can purchase any make type- 
writer on monthly paymenb 
aa small as $5.00 it is not a 
question of affording it 

The essential question is if 
3rou can afford to be without 



The 

Typewriter 

Man 



125 N. Tejon 



Main 95 



Japanese Student Spoke 
At Open Forum Sunday 

By Marjorie Gilbert 
"Social Problems in Japan" was 
the subject of an address given by 
Kazuo Asami, a member of the Sen- 
ior Class, at the Open Forum meet- 
ing held in the court house last 
Sunday. 

In his speech Mr. Asami stated 
that while Japan is just now passing 
through a period of transition from 
agriculture to that state where her 
economic life will depend entirely 
on manufacturing, she is entirely 
modern and western in material 
outlook. The most serious problem 
of his country today, in his opinion, 
concerns not the agricultural work- 
ers but the unemployment of the 
intellectual class. "Of 20,000 col- 
lege graduates pouring forth into 
society every year, only one-half 
are able to find employment," he 
said. A belief that the serious 
character of the communistic or so- 
cialistic agitation is Japan is due to 
the large number of these college 
graduates who are idle and discon- 
tented is Mr. Asami's opinion. 

Next Sunday, the speaker will be 
Rev. Hurley Begun of the All Souls 
Unitarian church. His subject will 
be "Prison Reform." 



Shakespeare Plays To 
Be Presented in Denver 



(Continued from page 6) 
The plays which will be produced 
include "Hamlet", "A Midsummer 
Night's Dream", "Julius Casear", 
"Romeo and Juliet", "The Merry 
Wives of Windsor," "Much Ado 
About Nothing", "Twelfth Night", 
and "Macbeth". 

The Board of Governors of the 
Shakespeare Memorial Theatre at- 
tempt to present the plays in what 
undoubtedly the spirit in which the 
author himself produced them. Per- 
formed in this manner, the plays 
are intensely interesting and enjoy- 
able to modern audiences. One 
finds in these plays, clear enuncia- 
tion of the lines; almost instan- 
taneous changes of scene; accuracy 
to their period in costume and man- 
ner; beauty and illusion in scenic 
display, and fitness to the time and 
action in the musical accompani- 
ment. 

Whatever profits which may ac- 
crue from the present lour will go 
lo the fund for rebuilding and en- 
dowing the Memorial Theatre at 
Stratford-upon-Avon. The founda- 
tion stone of the building was laid 
last July and it is expected that 
the theatre will be ready for oc- 
cupancy in the Spring of 1931. 



Alumni, Faculty 
In Kiwanis Jobs 



A large number of Colorado Col- 
lege alumni and faculty have been 
named committee chairmen of Ki- 
wanis Club for the year 1930. In- 
cluded in this number are Robert 
H. Crowder, chairman of the Atten- 
dance committee; I. E. Keyte, 
chairman of the Athletic commit- 
tee; Seeley K. Tompkins, chairman 
of the Education committee; J. F. 
Lawson, chairman of the publicity 
committee; and Jack Dern, chair- 
man of the Reception committee. 



Journalism Professor 
Commends News Course 



December 2, 1929. 
Professor J. F. Lawson, 
Colorado College, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 
Dear Mr. Lawson: 

I have looked over carefully your 
outline of the first semester, and it 
seems to me that it covers ade- 
quately the introductory work in 
newspaper reporting, with the pos- 
sible exception of sports writing. 
Yours sincerely, 

Willard G. Bleyer. 
University of Wisconsin. 




0S^//0 



jre They're Pure" 



Creole Squares 
at 35c lb. 



A variation of Dern- 
good Plantation Stick — 
with finest of New Or- 
leans Molasses this time. 
Feature Saturday, the 
18th. 



Dern's 



BUSY CORNER 
SHOE SHOP 

Shines — Shoe Repairs 
And Hats Blocked 



Tonight is 



College j 
Night— j 

with Darwin Coit's Orches- 4 
tra from 8 to 12 at the i 

Chapel Inn i 

Pikes Peak at Weber t 

i 

i 

i 

j 



Cover Charge 
50c 



Genevieve Engel returned to 
school Wednesday, after spending 
Tuesday in bed. 

Miss Bowers is helping out in the 1 
secretary's office. 

Jerry Cogan was seen hanging 
around the stage door after last 
night's performance of "What Hap- 
pened to Jones?" 

Margaret Crissman and Lillian 
Gibb seem to ride to biology lab 
these days! 

The Indians from Oklahoma seem 
to be getting along all right. 

So Knodel has become a geology 
tutor, but Neumarker takes her to 
church — and Collard rides her 



Under New Management 

The College 
Barber Shop 

Ralph Schildknecht, Proprietor 

103 E. Cache la Poudre 
Colorado Springs 



Arkansas Gazette — Washington 
is the capital of the Union; Reno of 
the disunion. 



around 



ue wagon. 



We understand that a certain 
Minerva pledge was caught eschew- 
ing an "Alhalete's Delight" down 
at Strachans the other day. B u t 
someone must get caught once in a 
while. 

What we want is more of the bas- 
ketball audiences attending in full 
dress. | 




K<irds — Ucsolog — Chrysler* 

I). C. HUTCHINS. Mur. 

Phone Main 180U 

21 No. CucMle 



THE TIGER 



Member of Rocky Mountain 

Inter-CoUegiate Press 

Association 




The Colorado College 

Newspaper, 

Published Weekly by the 

Students. 



THE TIGER 

Articles intended for publication should be left in the Tiger Box, on the first 
floor of Cobum library, by Wednesday noon. No unsigned contributions will be 
published. 



LLOYD H. ELLIS Main 1975 Editor 

James Keyser Associate Editor Barratt O'Hara Desk Editor 

Chauncey H. Blodgett, Jr. Sport Editor Margaret Gillen Society Editor 

Mark Parkinson Feature Editor John W. Haussermann, Jr Lit. Editor 



PAT PATTERSON Main 2575 Manager 



FINAL EXAMINATIONS. 

Announcement of the final semester examinations and the schedule 
of the hours which the exams come have been printed in the Tiger this 
week. Probably even by this time, all New Year resolutions have been 
broken; yet it would not be out of place to look back on the past 
school year, and make resolutions concerning the next semester. One 
of the greatest of these resolutions should govern the selection of cours- 
es. It is not too early to be thinking what one will take the next semes- 
ter. An early careful start will mean much when the next final semes- 
ters come around again. 



"DYED IN WOOL" COMMERCIALISTS PASS. 

A new era in the management of class productions has begun this 
year vAth the Junior Farce. In a contract with the Associated Student 
Council and the manager of the play, Richard Vanderhoof, the Junior 
class receives sixty per cent of the profits and the manager, forty per 
cent. 

For many years it has been the custom for managers to take all 
the proceeds of school activities, and leave nothing for the college it- 
self. Such a practice detracts from any honor in managing a function, 
and places it on purely a commercial basis. Both the Student Council 
and Vanderhoof should be commended for their attempt to bring man- 
agerships back to an unselfish agreement between the college and the 
manager. 

SPORTSMANSHIP BAD AT SATURDAY'S GAME. 

Booing and hissing a referee always shows a lack of proper sports- 
manship, and helps not a bit in remedying poor decisions. In the ma- 
jority of cases, it is not the referee who is in fault but the audience. The 
referees are usually professional men, who have played in a great num- 
ber of athletic contests, who have spent hours watching games, and who 
have studied the game much more than the average spectator. It is not 
experience alone that fits these men to give decisions. They are placed 
in the best place to see the game played. If they could watch the game 
better in the stands, they would be there to referee it. When a crowd 
of spectators, who probably never played a game of basketball in their 
life, boo an experienced referee who is in a position to see fouls com- 
mitted, they make their ignorance only more pronounced. 

Only the satisfaction of hitting a person who cannot hit back is 
gained from these catcalls. Perhaps, a referee does makes a mistake; 
referees are only human; but the booing does not correct that error. 
If the referee did see a foul committed, and he is usually the one who 
sees the better, he will feel the injustice, and will be looking for the 
next foul with twice as much determination to catch the player . The 
catcalls will not intimidate him, it will make him more aggressive. Ref- 
erees hardly ever call every foul; they give both teams a little leeway, 
and when one cheering section boos him, there will be an unconscious 
leaning toward the other side. To do so is human. 

The C. C. cheering section at the game last Saturday evening did 
not always show the proper respect toward the referee chosen by offi- 
cials of the Rocky Mounlani Conference. Twice, it protested decisions. 
That "razzing" of the referee did not end with the game Saturday eve- 
ning. The referee will remember it. If it happens in the following 
games of the year, Colorado College will soon have an unsavory repu- 
tation, and that reputation will reflect directly back to the attitude of 
referees toward the Tiger team, and the attitude of teams of the Rocky 
Mountain Conference toward the student body of Colorado College, 



Student President Returns From Meeting 



By Cliff Goodson 
Stewart Wilson, president of the 
Associated Students, has just return- 
ed from California where he attend- 
ed the annual meeting of the Na- 
tional Students Federation of Amer- 
ica which was held at the Stanford 
Union Building at Stanford Uni- 



Official Notices 



Freshman students in the depart- 
ment of Arts and Sciences are re- 
quested to note that they may sat- 
isfy the freshman mathematics re- 
quirement for the second semester 
by taking either College Algebra 
(Math.) or Mathematical Theory of 
Investment (Math. 18) or Statis- 
tics (Math. 20). Candidates for 
the degree of A. B. in Business 
and Banking are required to take 
the Mathematical Theory of Invest- 
ment (Math. 18), and those in En- 
gineering to take the four hour 
course in College Algebra (Math 
le). 

Students in t h e departments of 
Arts and Science whose interest lie 
in the direction of economics or 
business will find it advantageous 
to elect either Mathematical Theory 
of Investment or Statistics. Those 
inclined toward forestry, pedagogy, 
or sociology will find Statistics most 
useful. Those interested in Math- 
ematics or in the laboratory sciences 
should register for College Algebra. 
Students whose interests lie in other 
directions, or who are undecided as 
to their inclinations, will, in most 
cases, find it best to elect College 
Algebra. 

Anyone of these three courses is 
acceptable as a prerequisite for the 
sophomore course in Analytic 
Geometry. 



versity during the latter part of last 
year. 

Our president brought back many 
new ideas on student government 
and soon as the full report of the 
meeting is delivered to him, he will 
talk at an assembly in the near 
future on the results of this years 
meeting. Among the things discuss- 
ed at the conference were publica- 
tions, honor system, fraternities, 
athletic relations, student union 
buildings and managerial system in 
student activities. 

"Stew" reports that the Federa- 
tion for the first time will collect 
dues from the students, attending 
the member institutions. These will 
only amount to two cents per an- 
num, and will be payed by the Stu- 
dent Council as heretofore. This will 
make available an endovmient fund 
for the Student Federation of 
several hundred thousand dollars to 
be given by eastern philanthropists. 
Through this endowment fund the 
organization will be able to render 
greater service to its member insti- 
tutions through radio programs, and 
sews items sent to college papers. 
The Federation plans to have a 
traveling Secretary under this new 
regime which will be made possible 
by the additional funds. 

There were two hundred and 
fifty schools represented at the 
meeting, five of which are located 
in Colorado. In the past this sec- 
tion has belonged to the Pacific 
Coast Division, but by a new allott- 
ment of divisions the Rocky Moun- 
tain Conference becomes a separate 
section and is entitled to a re- 
presentive on the executive com- 
mittee. Elton Pace of Utah Uni- 
versity was elected the first delegate 
from the new Rocky Mountain Divi- 
sion to serve on the committee. 



Literary 



LINES WRITTEN AT SAN CAPISTRANO 

By Emondille 
0, thou playmate of those shores remote. 
Companion in hours of divers wandering — 
Thy hand, though gone, still holds that golden key 
To a self I knew when you were near. 
My pen is idle, dry. 
On shores, remote, no longer mine. 
But his, you play amid his love's unfoldment. 
My lyre is stilled: no breath of flame. 
Fanned from yon altar, stirs its strings. 
My hollow memory resounds with empty shadows 
Of tKat past, when your silhouetted tree, 
A lovely urn capped with thyme. 
Meant whisperings from the Flame. 
It burns, I wither my thoughts for the urn . . . 
A silhouetted tree remains: 
A memory. 



THE TIGER 



SCHEDULE FOR FINAL EXAMINATIONS— FIRST SEMESTER, 1929-30 

8:00 A. M. to 10:00 A. M. 



Friday, January 24 

Fren. la — 45 

Fren. lb— 48 

Fren. Ic — 28 

Fren. Id— 19 



Fren. 2a-— 32 
Fren 2b— 19 
Fren. 2c— 29 

Germ. 1 a — 32 
Germ, lb-^8 
Germ, lc-45 

Germ. 2 — 32 



Saturday, January 25 

Bus. 1—23 
Chem. 5a— 27 
Chem. 6a— 24 
Eng. Ab— 31 
Eng. le— 45 
Eng. Ig— 22 
Eng. Xb— 30 
Geol. 3— C 

Hist, n— TS 
Hist. 23— AB 
Journal. — 13 
Lat. Aa — 44 
Math. 3d— 21 
Math. 3f— 29 X 
Math. 7—36 
Phil. 4—48 
Soc. 1 — 52 



Monday, January 27 

Art 10—52 
Bible 20—27 
Bus. 5—20 
Chem. 2a— 24 
Chem. 2b— 24 
Econ. 1 — 3 
Eng. 2c— 51 
Eng. 2d-45 
Eng. 5—31 
Eng. 11—13 
Geol. lb— C 
Greek 1—44 
Hist. 3—19 
Lat. Ab— 48 
Math. 2b— 21 
Math. 9—29 
Phys. 3—32 
p. Sci. 3—30 



Tuesday, January 28 Wednesday, January 29 



Biol. 15—38 
Biol. 31 --42 
Bus. 37—51 
Econ. 4—23 
Educ. 9—35 
Eng. Aa— 31 
Eng. Xa— 45 
Eng. la— 24 
Eng. lc-^8 
Eng. lb— 28 
Geol. 13— C 
Hist. 26—30 
Lat. Ba— 3 
Math. 3h— 21 
Math. 3i— 29 
Math. 3j— 19 
Math. 4—20 
Psych. 4—33 
Span. 11—13 



10:30 A. M. to 12:30 P. M. 



Anthrop. 1 — 3 
Bible 26—37 
Bus. 108—51 
Educ. 2-45 
Music 1— P 
Psych, la— 48 



Span, la — 32 
Span, lb— 45 
Span. Ic — 48 

Span. 2a — 45 
Span. 2b-48 
Span. 2c — 32 



Bible 18—37 
Biol. 2—42 
Biol. 7—38 
Bus. 3—45 
Chem. 3—24 
Chem. 25—26 
Econ. 12—51 

Eng. 4—30 
Eng. 15—22 
For. 1 a — C 
Fren. x — 28 
Hist, la— 3 &32 
Hist. 2—19 
Hist. 7—23 
Math. 3e — 21 
Math. 6—29 
Math. 12—27 
Psych. 12—35 
Soc. 101—20 &48 
Soc. 2—50 
Span. X — ^31 



BioL 33—42 
Bus. 7a— 51 
Chem. 16—24 
Eng. 3—45 
Eng. 6—48 
Eng. 36—31 
Greek 2—44 
Lat. Bb— 38 
Lat. 1— AB 
Math. 3a— 29 
Math. 3b— 21 
Math. 3c— 20 
Math. 3k— 23 

p. Sc. la— 19 
Span. 13— RO 



1:45 to 3:45 P. M. 

Art 13—52 



Bible 31—52 
Biol, la— 38 
Biol, lb— 38 
Bus. 6—51 

Chem. la— 24 
Chem. lb— 24 
Econ. 21—23 
Eng. 2a— 20 
Eng. 2b— 30 
Eng. 10--45 
Eng. 53—31 
Fren. 15—28 
Geol. la — C 
Hist. 10—19 
Hist. 46— AB 
Lat. 70—44 

Math. 2a— 29 

Phil. 1-48 
Phys. la— 32 
Phys. lb— 32 
p. Sc. 2—13 



Educ. la-45 
Fren. 10— RO 
Psych, lb— 48 
Span. 3 — 28 
Eng. li— 20 



EXAMINATIONS IN THE FOLLOWING COURSES WILL BE 
SCHEDULED BY INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTORS: 



Art 3 


— = 


Forestry 2 


Physics 5. 11, 13, 15. 17.24.26. 


Biology 36, 37 




German 3 


30 


Business 11, 29. 201 
Chemistry 5b, 6b, 26b, 
Civil 5. 81 
Education 6, 15 


Thesis 


Geology 2, 4. 103 
Graphics 1.2,3, 6, 7, Special 
History 47. 48 
Latin 60 


Shop 1 

Psychology 10, Honors 
Sociology 2a, 8. 9 
All Topics Courses 


English 23, Topics 




Music 2, 4, 5, 7. 9, 10. 3 


Italian 2 


Dramatic Expression 




Philosophy 19 


French 4 



THE TIGER 



"Better Equipped Than Ever 
To Handle College Trade." 



CAMPBELL'S 

BARBER SHOP 



109 East Pikes Peak Avenue 



Broken Lenses Duplicated 

Save the Pieces 

Eyes examined Lenses Ground 




THE LAUTERMAN-DUGAN 

JEWELRY AND OPTICAL CO. 

Jewelers, Optometrists and 

Mfg. Opticians 

Fine Watch, Clock and Jewelry 

Repairing 
121 N. Tejon St. Phone Main 674 



FRANK SARLAS & CO. 

Shoe Shining and Repairing 

Hats Qeaned and Blocked 

Quick Service 

132 E. Pikes Peak 



^Ojiillk 




TENT PAWNING CO 



Awnings and Camp Supplies 



SOCIETY 



PLAZA HOTEL BEAUTY SHOP 
Finger wave — Marcels 

Permanent Waves 

Phone Main 2515 



DUTCH 



(Hammond) for new driver- 
less cars. 

New Fords 7c per mile; 
30c f>er hour. 

New Cheve Six's 8c per mile; 
35c per hour. 

Office 

ELK HOTEL I 

Phones M. 346 and 2065 
Free Deliveij 



Abbotts Return ) 

Dr. and Mrs. Lewis Abbott and 
family returned Friday after a brief 
visit in the East. They have been 
in Philadelphia, Washington and 
New York. While in New York 
Dr. Abbott attended a meeting of 
the Colorado College Alumni Asso- 
ciation of that city. 

Miss Ellis Reviews Paper 

Miss Amanda Ellis reviewed Alex- 
ander Nazaroff's "Tolstoy, the In- 
consistent Genius," at the meeting 
of the Reviewers Club January 
sixth. This club is composed half 
of women connected with Colorado 
College and half of women of Colo- 
rado Springs. 

Helen Hageman Engaged 

Announcement was made Tues- 
day evening at the Dais of the en- 
gagement of Miss Helen Hageman 
and Mr. Charles Steen, Jr. Miss 
Hageman is a Senior at Colorado 
College, a member of Contemporary 
Society and has been active in col- 
lege activities. Mr. Steen is a stu- 
dent at Denver University and is 
a member of Sigma Chi Upsilon 
fraternity. 

Miss Purvis Entertains 

Miss Louise Purvis entertained 
at dinner Wednesday evening in 
Bemis Hall, Dr. and Mrs. Paul 
Roberts and girls in the halls who 
are members of the Episcopal 
Church. 

Delta ^pha Phi Dance 

Delta Alpha Phi entertained at a 
dance Saturday night, January 1 1 , 
at the chapter house. The guests 
were Eileen Morey, Kathrine Jones, 
Harriet Kingsley, Olive Bradley, 
Mildred Armstrong, Mary Bloom, 
Annabell Hutchison, Virginia Freu- 
denberger, Fayetta Sanford, Theta 
Jones, Doris Shoffner, Josephine 
Dickison, Fredda Wooton, Gertrude 
Freudenberger, Anebel Ohrstedt, 
Helen Goodsell, Mildred Short, 
Sarah Sutton, Mrs. Ray Hope, Prof. 
Charles Page, Ward Edwards, and 
Carl Nelson. Dean and Mrs. Her- 
shey and Professor and Mrs. Okey 
chaperoned the party. 
— — — 

Attend Kappa Sig Dance 

Several members of Beta Omega 
of Kappa Sigma and their guests 
went to Denver last Friday eve- 
ning to attend a dance at the new 
Kappa Sigma chapter house at the 
University of Denver. Colorado 
College people who attended t h e 
dance included Arthur Baylis, Paul 
Conover, Thomas D. Jones, Nelson 
Brown, Field Bohart, Marie Ban- 
ning, and Virginia Easton. 



Chapel Inn Dinner Dance 

Colorado College students who 
attended the dinner dance at the 
Chapel Inn, last Friday evening in- 
cluded Lois Seebach, Alyce Ireland, 
Katherine Poland, Miriam Lockhart, 
Josephine Campbell, Eva Crowder, 
Dorothy Horn, Grace Perkins, Ruth 
Tom Frame, Sarah Sheldon, Mari- 
an Coles, Genevieve Engel, Patricia 
Johnson, Mary Elizabeth Pitts, Lor- 
na Dorlac, Jean Horan, Randalin 
Irippel, Margaret Crissman, Helen 
Hummel, Harriet Floyd, Jane Low- 
ell, Adda Smith, Selma Azar, Hazel 
Biddlecome, Dorothy Chambers, 
Burton Paddock, T. Ernest Nowels, 
Harold Sarkisian, James Simon, 
James Patterson, Barratt O'Hara, 
Gilbert Rice, Glen Wade, Elton 
Slate, Jerry Cogan, John Metzler, 
Charles Wilgus, Roy Vandenburg, 
Don Scott, Albert Brown, Jack Ja- 
cobs, Harry Burton, Lloyd Ellis, 
Mark Perkinson, Edward Cass, 
Ralph Smith, Elvin Griffith, Bruce 
Gray. 

••• — ••• 

Minerva Initiation 

Five new members of the Min- 
erva society will be initiated at 
their club house on Sunday after- 
noon at five o'clock. The new 
members of the society are Frances 
Willis, Martha Catherine Sharer, 
Betty Lansdown, Velma Rose, Mary 
Gallagher, Marian Weinberger, Son- 
ia Benderoff, Alyce Ireland, and 
Margaret Southmayd. Dinner at 
the Chapel Inn, honoring the new 
members, will follow the formal in- 
itiation. 

••••••••• 

Sigma Chi Apache Dance 

The annual Sigma Chi Apache 
dance will be held tomorrow eve- 
ning at the chapter house. Coit's 
orchestra will furnish the music for 
the affair which is to be a costume 
party. 

Contemporary Initiates Five 

Initiation of five new members 
of Contemporary society was held 
at the club house, Saturday morn- 
ing, January 1 1 . The affair was 
followed by luncheon at the Chapel 
Inn. The new members of Con- 
temporary are — Elizabeth Kennedy, 
Marifrances Vollmer, Mary Bloom 
Virginia Freudenberger, and Vir- 
ginia Patterson. 

Coffee Hour 

The coffee hour program at Be- 
mis Hall, Sunday was furnished by 
Miss Alvaretta Enman. Miss En- 
man gave several piano numbers 
and a group of musical readings. 
Miss Leta Gale played the piano ac- 
companiments for the readings. 



You will Look and Feel Better 
after seeing us. 

Elk Barber Shop 

122 East Pikes Peak 



T. J. Collier T. M. Collier 

V. L. Collier 

TheCOLUER 

LUMBER CO. 

Phone Main 386 
543 W. Colorado Ave. 



EAT 'EM UP TIGERS 

Then come down and eat 
that tasty 
Confection 

AVS FRENCH 
FRIED POPCORN 

114 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 



PAUDRE-PAUFFE 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Permanent Finger and Water 

Waving 

Manicure and Scalp Treatments 

Marcels 50c. 



The Trip that Bankrupts the 
English Language 

CORLEY 

Mt. Highway 

Cripi^e Creek in high gear 



LOOK YOURBESl 

Have your hair cut in the 
approved manner. 

Pete's Barber Shop 

8 E. Cucharras St. 



Jg? 



Strachan's 
Sweet 
Shop 

Bijou and Nevada 

Try our Malts and Toasted 

Sandwiches 



^ 



THE TIGER 



COVERS 
ALL THE FIELD 



SPORTS 



BASKETBALL 
CROSS COUNTRY EQUITATION 



Inquiring 

Reporter 



Question — What is your opinion 
on the two first games the Tigers 
played against Kansas Aggies? 

Raymond "Fat" Hayden — "They 
are probably the toughest games 
the Tigers will play this season. The 
team showed up remarkably well." 

Alice Aaby — "Manager Jo Irish 
Irish showed foresight in scheduling 
those two games at the beginning 
of the season. The Tiger team 
shows speed and a good offense 
which will be strengthened after 
more practice together." 

Elizabeth Kennedy — "Dutch 
Clark was as good as ever after not 
having practiced with the team for 
three weeks." 



CHOCOLATES 
Good as Made 

Box Goods a Specialty 
WALLACE CANDY COMPANY 



Quality 

Cleaners and Dyers 

SUITS, O'COATS 

HATS $1.25 

U-Fone 1-8-1-1 We'll Call 

H. A. Thompson 
10 E. Kiowa 



WHY NOT 

Learn Typewriting 
while attending Col- 
lege? Your teachers 
will appreciate type- 
written work to be 
checked. We can ar- 
range hours to suit 
your convenience. 



G 









^<^^^^' 



TIGERS DIVIDE SERIES WITH 
FAST WESTERN STATE QUINTET 



Playing against a vastly im- 
proved Western State quintet, the 
Tigers divided a pair of games with 
the Mountaineers last week end, 
losing to them 18-16 in the first of 
the series, and winning the second 
game 38-22. 

The first game, from the specta- 
tors standpoint, was a washout. 
The teams played 17 minutes be- 
fore a 2-2 time was broken. Neither 
team seemed able to hit the hoop, 
altho there were a hundred shots 
taken in that time, and the ball was 
passed to and fro, up and down, 
and 'round and 'round, for the long 
period— without even a whisper 
coming from the crowd. The tie 
was broken when the invaders got 
two baskets and the Bengals two 
free throws, as the half ended. 

The last half began as tight as 
the first two periods, but the teams 
warmed up after a few minutes, and 
the Tigermen took the lead. Hum- 
mell, freshman star for the winners, 
began to click at this time, .how- 
ever — and hit the hoop from all 
angles, to put the game into an- 
other tie, with a few minutes left 
to play. Hummell, however, got 
free in one corner, in the closing 
seconds, and looped one thru to put 
the game in cold storage. 

The feature of the next night's 
game was the return to form of 
Ingraham, flashy forward, who .has 
been off-stride since his freshman 
year — not getting into uniform at 
all last season, due to an injury re- 
ceived in the Aggie football game 
of 1928. The blonde Swede lead 
the passing attack, as well as ty- 
ing for high score honors with 
Clark and Waters. 

The Tigers took the lead and lost 
it again several times in the first 
few minutes of the game, but then 
jumped ahead and after that were 
never headed. At the half they 
the heavy end of a 22-13 score, and 
continued their march to victory 
without interruptions, until the fi- 
nal gun. 

The Mountaineers were without 
the services of their two stars, Da- 
vis and Hyink, who have been de- 
clared ineligible due to their affil- 
iation with a junior college in the 
middle west, last year. On the 
other hand, their star player. 
Downs, was seen everywhere on the 



floor in the first game, altho show- 
ing poorer form in the second. 

Waters, Clark, and Ingraham all 
missed set-ups in the latter game — 
altho their work in getting the ball 
within scoring distance was flaw- 
less. The foul shooting of tihe 
team was far better in the two 
games than it had been at any other 
time this season, averaging two out 
of three, which was a great im- 
provement over the previous games 
of the year. 



Bob Doyle, who will see action 
in the D. U.-C. C. game. 



All- American Tiger 
Announces Engagement 

Announcement has been made of 
the engagement of Miss Dorothy 
Schrader of Pueblo and Earl Harry 
Clark, nationally known Colorado 
college athlete. Miss Schrader at- 
tended the Colorado State Teachers 
college at Greeley, and is teaching 
in the Minnequa school in Pueblo. 
Mr. Clark, captain of the Colorado 
college football and basketball 
teams and All-American star, is a 
member of Phi Gamma Delta. The 
wedding will take place in the 
spring after Mr. Clark's graduation 
from Colorado college. 





OS- 

Service 

CCESSORIES TIPCS 

OiCVClES- CAS & OIL 



GARAGE TIRE SERVICE 

CORDUROY CORDS 

Sidewall Protection 




S er vices f o r your 
car that includes 

Proper Lubrication 

100% Alemite 
LEADING MOTOR OILS 

Weaverized Washing 

Tire Repairing Road Service 

Drive in Today 



FIRESTONE TIRES 
117 N. Nevada Phone M. 202 



5 N. Tejon 



12V8 N. Nevada 



2 SHOPS 



Quality Lunch 



TRY OUR HAMBURGERS AND CHIU 
Orders over $1.00 delivered free. 



M. 1784 



M. 146SJ 



10 



THE TIGER 



CURRENT ART EXHIBITIONS 
MUSIC 



THEATRE 



CINEMA REVIEWS— BOOKS 
DRAMA 



This week's Candy Special 



Bitter 
Sweets 



40c lb, 



Barthel'S 

Tejon Street at 
Acacia Park Comer 




HORSHEIM 
SHOES 




Reg. $10 and $ 



This is the time to get ac- 
quainted with Florsheim 
Shoes . . . the only time 
you can buy them at this 
low price. 

/or SO. TCJON ST. 



Junior Farce Opening 
Success Last Evening 



Hale Spoke At Euterpe 
Club Tuesday Evening 



By James Keyser 

Shrieks, the chilling laughter of 
a madman, kisses for all the women 
from the leading man and extra 
kisses for one of the beautiful girls 
of the cast from one of the hand- 
some boys, impersonations; spark- 
ling repartee and clever asides, all 
these make the Junior Farce a suc- 
cess as it was presented last night 
and is to be presented tonight at 
the Little Theater in the Auditori- 
um. 

Bill Hinkley may be an athletic 
hero in real life but when seen on 
the stage we forget all about that 
and think only of him as Jones, 
traveling for a hymn book house 
and selling playing cards as a side 
lin«, impersonating a bishop, and 
kissing every goodlooking member 
of the cast and some that are not. 
Mary Strachan has the major wom- 
an's part. She sets off Bill's stage 
humor by taking ,him seriously at 
every turn and by giving a really 
finished performance. Vessey, as 
a professor, gives his impressions of 
that group of Gods or Demi-Gods 
and a very interesting impression it 
is. As the madman, Johnny 
Thurston sends chills down the 
warmest back and as a cop he 
makes one glad that only in stage 
plays do they grow so tough. Duke 
Tucker and Lorna Dorlac furnish 
the love interest. Enough said. 
Genevieve Engel is a gold digging 
maid who does not enthuse over 
anything until Hinkley kisses her. 
Jerry WilHams is spinster pining for 
love, does she get it? Enter the 
"Dear Bishop" and Hump Saunders 
is a wow! Indeed he is wasting 
his time with political science. But 
why am I telling you all about it? 
Come and see for yourself tonight. 



The Euterpe Musical Society met 
at the home of Miss Beryl Griswold, 
915 N. Weber., on Tuesday even- 
ing, January 14th, with 35 members 
and guests present. Dean Hale 
gave a very mteresting talk on 
"Pianoforte Playing", similiar to 
the paper he will give in Denver, 
at the musical Convention, which 
will be held next week. At the 
the close of the program, refresh- 
ments were served by the hostess, 
and a social hour followed. 

The following program was 
given : 
Violm 

Romance from Concerto — 

Opus 22 Wieniaski 

Canto Amoroso.... ..Mischa-Elman 

Gail Dein 
Accomp., Mrs. A. R. Black 
Reading 

Mrs. Casey Selected 

How Not to Tell Stories to Child- 
ren... Selected 

Betty Sweetman 
Piano 

Prelude in C Minor. Chapin 

Etude in C Minor ....Chapin 

Ethel Bley Smith 
Mixed Quartet 

Come Where My Love Lies 

Dreaming Foster 

Ciribiribim ..Pestalozza 

Lyman De Gier, Anita 

Osborn, Beryl Griswold, 

Robert White 

Accomp., Lucille Clinebell 



Famous Writers 

Join In Talkie 



Two of America's most popular 
writers collaborated on the play, 
"Cameo Kirby," which, adapted as 
a romantic musical drama featur- 
ing J. Harold Murray and Norma 
Terris, will be seen and heard on 
the audible screen of the America 
Theatre next Thursday. 

Booth Tarkington and Harry Le- 
on Wilson, the co-authors, have 
been prominent for two decades. 

Tarkington has twice won t h e 
Pulitzer prize for literature. He 
started his literary career in 1889 
with his highly successful first nov- 
el, "The Gentleman From Indiana." 
A year later he wrote "Monsieur 
Beaucaire." His later books have 
included, "Penrod and Sam," "Sev- 
enteen," "The Magnificent Amber- 
sons," "Alice Adams," "Gentle Ju- 
lia," "The Midlander," and "The 
Plutocrat." 



Girls must be more forgiving tha 
men; they make up more often. 



DR. LORD SPEAKS IN PIT 



'Virginian-Pilot — Experience must 
b6 a good school or so many peo- 
ple wouldn't be taking post-gradu- 
ate courses. 



Dr. Louis Lord of Oberlin College 
an author of note gave a most in- 
teresting lecture at the pit Thursday 
evening, his subject was "Excavat- 
ing the Athenian Agora". Many 
interesting protographic slides add- 
ed greatly to the interest of the lec- 
ture. 

Dr. Lord was brought here thru 
the courtesy of our local branch of 
the Archaeological Institute of 
America, headed by W. W. Postleth- 
waite, treas., of Colorado College. 




J A M C T Stand up on your legs, 

GAVnOR be like two fried eggs- 

CHARLES "^^^P y°"^ 

FARRELL, SUNNY SIDE UP/ 




THE CLASS OF 1931 PRESENTS 



"What Happened to Jones" 

FEATURING George Broadhurst's latest Farce hit 

BILL fflNKLEY, MAXINE MOORE, AND ELEVEN OTHER STARS 
Little Theatre Tonite 8: 15 Prices 75c and $1.00 



THE TIGER 



11 



A SERVICE 
for Every Purse 



THE 
PEARL LAUNDRY 



"It Pays To Look Well' 

Alatno Hotel 

BARBER AND BEAUTY SHOP 

R. W. Counts, Prop. 
Phone Main 1255-W 124 S. Tejon 



BUICK AND MARQUETTE 
MOTOR CARS 

Strang's 



Harry D. MacDonald 
President 



Made in Colorado Springs 

VAN BRIGGLE 
ART POTTERY 

The world's most famous 
art pottery. 

Visitors always welcome. 




30 N. Tejon Phone M. 214 



CITY COAL 

15 East Pikes Peak Avenue 

Phone 

Main 67 or 120 



Hulbert River Series 
Complete; Is New Book 



"The Steamboat and the Great 
Plains Empire" and "The Niagara 
River" are the last two articles of 
a series by Professor Hulbert en- 
titled "The Romance of American 
Rivers" published in the November 
and December numbers of "Nation- 
al Waterways." The series will be 
published in book form under t h e 
title "Old Maa River in American 
History. 



Sixteen Trees Moved; 
Make Way For Chapel 



Under the supervision of Arthur 
Baylis, superintendent of grounds, 
the work of removing the trees 
from the site of the new chapel 
building is progressing rapidly, and 
everything will be ready for the 
work to start on the foundation as 
as soon as the frost leaves the 
ground in the spring. All except 
three of the sixteen trees have 
been transplanted. 

Work of this sort must be done 
in mid-winter, when the frost is in 
the ground, in order that the earth 
moved with the roots of the trees 
may be moved more easily and 
without damage to them. Several 
tons of earth are moved with the 
roots of each tree. 

Among the trees which have been 
transplanted are two very valuable 
English Lindens. These trees, to- 
gether with the other English Lin- 
dens on the campus were imported 
from England and planted here in 
1904. They are the only ones of 
their kind in this region, and it is 
hoped that the transplanting will 
not kill them. The conditions were 
very favorable for their transplant- 
ing, and Mr. Baylis is of the opin- 
ion that they will live. The rest of 
the trees to be moved are all Elm 
and Ash with the exception of one, 
which was a Cottonwood and was 
too large to transplant. Several 
large cottonwoods have been c u t 
down and removed from the cam- 
pus to make room for the Elm and 
Ash, which are much more valu- 
able. 



Alumnus Transferred 

To Post At Capital 



The transfer of Mr. Bruce An- 
derson from the Picatinny Arsenal, 
New Jersey to Washington, D. C. 
where he holds the position of 
Assistant to the Chief of the Ex- 
plosives Department of the War 
Department has just been an- 
nounced. Mr. Anderson graduated 
in 1924 with a major in physics at 
Colorado College. 



Couture's 

French Cleaning £ind Dyeing Co. 

Phones 1288-1289 
218 N. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 



for hot, clean 

clinkerless fuel 

— call the "coal phone' 

M 577 




COAL/ 



The Ice Cream 
that's a C. C. 
"Institution" 

The between Class "Cones", 
t h e sandwich materials and 
candy, the ice creams and ices 
for class and club functions. 

From Frosh to Grad it's t h e 
place every Tiger knows. 

Mo WRY' S 

Across from Campus 

Main 1183, 1184 



THE 

WHITE WAY 

SYSTEM 

Open Unta 2 A. M. 

Try our delicioos White 
Way ChiH 

11 N. Tejon St. 



H 



OWARD'S 

BARBER 
SHOP 



19 East Bijou Street 



The Colorado Planing 
Mill Co. 

MILL WORK OF ALL 
DESCRIPTIONS 

PADDLES 
Frank Mitchell, Manager 

Phone 2876-W 
525 W. Colorado Ave. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE J. S. BROWN 

MERCANTILE 

COMPANY 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



FOR PLUMBING AND HEATING WORK 

^•'"^ BUMSTEAD'S If 

"Where Your Dollars Have More Cents" 



Called For— Delivered — Laundered — 
and Ready to Use 

SHEETS 7 cents 

BATH TOWELS 2 cents 

NAPKINS 1 cent 

The Elite Way 

IS the Most Economical 

PHONE MAIN 82 

'^^ LAUNDRY and . 

DRY CLEANING ; 

» 




12 



THE TIGER 




THE HORSE AWAITS WITHOUT 
LOttD DUZZLEBIJIIT 



"If you ask me," replied Aletia coldly, "you seem to have 
brought the hoarse in with you. The hoarseness of your 
voice repels me, sir! If you wish me to go buggy-riding 
with you, you'd better change toOLDGOLDS. 

"When my heart leaves me, it will go to the man who 
smokes this queen-leaf cigarette. There's not a throat- 
scratch in a trillion." 



© p. L. Co. 




FASTEST GROWING CIGARETTE IN HISTORY. . .NOT A COUGH IN A CARLOAD 



ELECTROL OIL BURNERS 
Plumbing Heating 



312 N. 
Custer 



Jar 




itfkt 



Phone 
Main 
1674 



Subscribe NOW for the 



•TODAY'S NEWS TODAY' 



GAZETTE-TELEGRAPH 

Morning — Evening — Sunday All The News All The Time 



Daily Only 
55c per month 



Combination 
$1.30 per month 



Daily and Sundaj 
75c per month 



m\mm\\mmm\mmm\mm\^ 



9bc Colorado College ^^ 

iiiiiriicr 



iiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiMimiMiiiiiMtinMuiriiiiiriia 



il 




i 



llllll'' ,ti 




VOLUME XXXII 
Number 16 



OfUciai Students Publication 

January 24, 1930 



iiiriiriiriiiiiiiiirMriiiiinriiiiriiiM 



l«i(SSil«ffll!SlSSlH(!i!!!!!M«SI«»i!!! 



iMiMiiiriiiiriiriiiiiMiMiMnininiiiiiiiiiiiiM 



iiiiiiiiiiiMnriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiMiiiiMiiiiiii!^ 



I{egistration: February Third and Fourth 




iV 



REGISTRATION of freshmen and sophomores for the second semester will be held at 
the gymnasium in Cossitt Hall on Monday, February 3. Upperclassmen and special students 
will register on Tuesday. This week's "Tiger" includes the announcements of a number of 
new courses for next semester. 




Office of Publication: 23 Weit Colorado Ave., Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE TIGER 



PLAZA HOTEL BEAUTY SHOP 
Finger wave — Marcels 

Permanent Waves 

Phone Main 2S15 



CHOCOLATES 

Good as Made 

Box Goods a Specialty 

(VALLACE CANDY COMPANY 



SUPERIOR 

Dry Cleaning Co. 

Telephone 1364 129 N. Tejon 



Good Plumbing and Heating 

Get an estimate on your next job 

J. C.ST. JOHN 

PLUMBING©' HEATING COMPANY 



226 N. Tejon St. 



B 



AKER 

Automatic Oil 
URNER 



M. 48 



SPECIAL EVENING DINNERS 

From 6 to 7:30 P. M. 

35c The COLLEGE INN 35c 



PiGGlVkWiCCLY 



ss: 



ALL OVER THE WORLD 

FIVE BUSY STORES IN 

COLORADO SPRINGS 



Lest You Forget" 

MURRAY'S 



The old meeting place of C. C. students 
for more than twenty years. 



^^ 



College and Fraternity Goods, Text 
Books and Supplies 

Across from the Campus 




al*22 



.50 



You can buy choice of the best we 
have— and it's so good — Double 
the Price — regularly, would hardly 
meet the qualifications of the 
FURMBILT Garments — and the 
proof of the pudding is the eating 
thereof — and more than 900 have 
already partaken, to their satisfac- 
tion and profit — 

SUITS 
OVERCOATS 
TOPCOATS 

and TUXEDOS 

1000 Choices 

Just received 65 Tuxedo Vests — in 
black and white — single and double 



sted- 



at $4.50 and $5.00 



FIRMBILT 



20 N. Tejon St. 



CLOTHES 
FOR MEN 

P. L. THORSEN, Mgr. 



Knorr's Market 

FOR YOUR PARTIES OR PICNICS 



Let us supply you with 
good thbigs to eat 



123 North Tejon 



Phone 2602 



WAGNER-FULTS STUDIO 

Burns Theatre BIdg. 
Exclusive Photographers for the 

PIKES PEAK NUGGET 



QUALITY SERVICE 

MENS SUITS CLEANED AND PRESSED $1.00 




5fe^undry 



Phone 
356 



".'!«' Drj; Cleamnq 



19 E. CUCHARRAS St. 



Phone 

356 



Issued Friday of each week. Entered at the Post Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter. 



(THIB TIGtER 



VOLUME XXXII 



Colorado College Weekly News Magazine 



Number 16 



TEACHERS AND COWBOYS 
PLAY HERE NEXT WEEK 



Y. M. C. A. To Raise 
Money for China Project 



Following final semesters, the 
outstanding event of next week is 
the Colorado College - Colorado 
Teacher basketball game on Tues- 
day, February 28 in the City audi- 
torium. In the recent Tiger inva- 
sion, the Bengals suffered defeat, 
and are out to avenge this game. 

Coach Herigstad has indicated 
that there may be a shift in t h e 
line up so as to put a strong offen- 
sive as well as defensive team on 
the floor. 

The Teachers ,have a fine team, 
excellent at shooting and passing. 
Such stars as Ogle, and the dan- 
der brothers will be seen in action. 
Ogle is shifty, fast, and an excel- 
lent running guard. The Olanders 
play center and forward positions 
and are counted upon to stand 
welt up in the scoring. 

According to an announcement 
made by Jo Irish, graduate man- 
ager of athletics, the tickets good 
for Friday, January 24 will admit 
students to the game. For the 
Wyoming-C. C. games which will 
be played on Friday and Saturday, 
January 31 and February 1, the 
covers of the student pass will ad- 
mit stulents. 



At a meeting of the Colorado 
College branch of the Intercolleg- 
iate Y. M. C. A. held last Friday 
afternoon, Lyman Hoover, District 
Secretary from Denver, explained 
the plans of the organization for 
the coming semester. 

The annual Mid-winter confer- 
ence will be held in Denver during 
the latter part of February. The 
feature at this meeting, which will 
be attended by almost 100 college 
students from the Rocky Mountain 
1 Region will be a model assembly of 
' the League of Nations. The Sum- 
mer Conference is to be held in 
Estes Park during the third week in 
June. 

A forum discussion followed the 
regular meeting. Plans for a co- 
operative basis of work to be done 
with other schools in the raising of 
missionary money for the China 
Project were discussed. 



FEBRUARY THIRD AND FOURTH 
ARE DATES FOR REGISTRATION 



Information was released through the office of the Dean of the 
College, C. B. Hershey, Wednesday, regarding the courses to be offered 
second semester which were not available in the September registration. 
Some year courses which carry straight through although they change 
number at the half are not included in the list. Detailed descriptions 
of all courses are found under their department numbers in the College 



Catalog, to which we refer students 



Weaver Is Chosen For 
Job To Head Lanterns 

After a banquet last Sunday 
night at McRae's Restaurant, t h e 
Red Lantern Club, honorary Senior 
organization, held their annual in- 
itiation and election. 

The new members initiated were: 
Marion Weaver, James Weir, Marks 
Jaillette, Tom Jones, Ed Parker, 
Harry Blunt, Milton Sprenger, 
Stewart Wilson, Earl Clark, John 
Cogan, Harold Harmon and Paul 
Vestal. 

Doc Weaver was elected presi- 
dent; Milton Sprenger, treasurer, 
and Harold Harmon, secretary. 

The purpose of the Red Lantern 
Club is to further worth while ac- 
tivities and instigate movements 
for the betterment of the school 
campus. 

At this meeting it was proposed 
to the faculty to have two required 
assemblies every week, thus pro- 
moting enthusiasm and pep. The 
Club also decided to discourage 
dates at athletic contests, and to 
stimulate better sportsmanship at 
basketball games. 



Fiji-Delta Alph Game 
Will Open Greek Race 



Drawing for the Intramural bas- 
ketball series was held at Cossitt 
Hall on Thursday. The first games 
will be Thursday, February 6 when 
the Phi Gams will tangle with the 
Delta Alphs and the Pi Kaps with 
the Independents. Coach Herig- 
stad will referee. A complete 
schedule of the series will be pub- 
lished in the next issue of the 
"Tiger." 



Hugh Bell Emphasizes 
Vision As Success Key 

"Factors in Leadersihip and 
Service" was the subject of an ad- 
dress given by Dr. Hugh H. Bell, 
interim pastor of the Presbyterian 
Church and former faculty mem- 
ber of the San Francisan Theoligan 
Seminary to the students in assem- 
bly Tuesday. 

"Where shall I be twenty years 
from now" is the question every 
college student should ask himself 
according to Dr. Bell who believes 
"Vision" to be the first factor 
toward success in leadership and 
service. Other essential factors 
emphasized by Dr. Bell are purpose, 
preparedness, and a passion for the 
work one does. 



Wyo. Summer School 
Attracts Prof. Gilmore 

During the coming summer. Pro- 
fessor Gilmore will conduct classes 
in Field Biology at the Summer 
School of the University of Wyo- 
ming in the Medicine Bow Moun- 
tains. 



Coach Van De Graaff Becomes Tutor 



By Wayne 
We are much endebted to Den- 
ver dailies for showing the fame of 
our Phi Beta Kappa coach, and 
how he has scratched numerous 
square inches of scholarly scalp 
bald while planning Tiger plays 
under the midnight rays of The 
Sun's Only Rival (adv.) But the 
sports scribes seem to care not at 
all for the fact that the stout, but 
sparse, stand of feathers on that 
same All-American pate is being 
clawed out by the sheaf under the 
labors of coaching Math. Hail! 
the Tiger Trig tutor! 

Several times in the last fort- 
night imperative notices have been 
scrawled on the bulletins of t h e 
various lodges revealing to the de- 
linquent wearers of college equip- 



Campbell 

ment the news that they will appear 
at the office of the Athletic Direc- 
tor, bringing a text book and an ex- 
Dectation of staying until they have 
learned something. These gentle- 
men are the guests at a Trigonom- 
etry tea, where cosines and char- 
acteristics are served up in the 
same sonorous tones that admon- 
ished them. "Don't eat no poke. 
Pie ?nd poke is bad grub for foot- 
ball," earlier in the semester. 

Between these sessions with 
sweet, silent thought Bully cruises 
about the campus with a complete 
eligibility list tucked among the let- 
ters — from home (?) — in his inside 
pocket, and pounces upon any other 
athletes with the stark evidence of 
E's and F's. They Shall Pass. 



n mapping out a second-half course. 
Courses which run a full year 
are not listed either, as they can 
only be entered regularly at the be- 
ginning of the first term. 

ART — Learning 

2. Renaissance of Art in Italy — 
Prerequisite, Art I. A study 
of Italian painting from the 
early Christian period to t h e 
height of the Renaissance. The 
major part of the course will 
be devoted to the study of the 
great masters of the fifteenth 
and sixteenth centuries in flor- 
ence, Rome, and Venice. Rec- 
itations and lectunes. Second 
semester. Given in 1929-1930 
and alternate years. 

6. Movements in 19th Century 
Art — Prerequisite, Art 10. 
Summary and criticism of mod- 
ern painting. Romanticism 
versus classicism in French art. 

(Continued on papre 6A) 

Nugget of 1930 Given 
High National Rating 

In addition to an All-American 
quarterback Colorado College may 
now boast of an All-American an- 
nual. The 1930 edition of the 
Pikes Peak Nugget was given an All 
American Honor Rating for coedu- 
cational schools having an enroll- 
ment of from 500 to 999. The 
award was made by the National 
Scholastic Press Association. 

The 1930 Nugget was edited by 
Jerry Cogan and Harry Blunt was 
manager. The book is one that 
well deserves this very superior 
rating. In the rating received from 
the Association the Nugget scored 
890 points out of a possible 1000. 
The points taken into consideration 
in grading the book were: plan of 
book and makeup, administration 
and faculty, album and classes, or- 
ganizations, activities, school life, 
editing and make-up. mechanical 
considerations and financial status. 
In practically all of these points 
the Nugget received an excellent 
score. 



THE TIGER 



Modish Pumps 



AT WULFF SHOE STORE 



Your beautiful gowns 
are complimented by 
these new evening 
pumps — in many colors 
and materials. 




Patent, Satin, Suede, French Kid 

Alluring models in a variety of colors and 
combinations, or in plain smart styles of 
extreme simplicity. 

$7.50 to $10 

Drop in and look them over — no obligation, 
and it will be a pleasure to assist you in 
making the proper selection. 

Wul/jf^3MeCo. 

110 S. Tejon St. 



Try a 
Ty-Lock 




It's l.he only real improvement in a shirt since 
H. M. (Home Made Only). This is it — 
the collar has neither button nor buttonhole, 
the tie locks it. And it's not only the style, 
but it's comfort 100%. May also be worn as 
a sport shirt without tie, or with tie loosely 
knotted. 

Ty-Lock Shirts $2.50 to $4 



"Trade With The Boys" 



Pikes Peak at Nevada 



7 DAYS LEAVE' 



Gary Cooper — "The Virginian' 
is now cast in his first all-starrins 
role— "7 DAYS LEAVE". 



"Seven Days Leave" opens at 
the Paramount Theatre Sunday and 
strikes a new no'e in cinema enter- 
tainment. 

Here is a play, a daring play. 
For it has not the slightest hmt of 
boy-and-giil love in it anywhere. 
But rot alone for this courageous 
omission of an hitherto pet formula 
of moviedom are its producers de- 
serving of praise. "Seven Days 
Leave" is worthy of the current 
movie season's biggest laurel tiara 
for the reason that it is one of the 
most poignantly human pieces of 
audible screen production ever pro- 
jected to the eyes and ears of 
American audiences. 

Based on the successful stage 
play, "The Old Lady Shows Her 
Medals," by Sir James M. Barrie, 
"Seven Days Leave" gains consid- 
erable substance by its transition to 
the celluloid medium. Suffice it to 
say that one must see and ,hear this 
picture to assimilate the full savor 
of its dramatic substance. 



MAHONEY SELECTED 



Denver, Colo., R. M. L P. A.— 
With the resignation of J. L. Bing- 
ham, graduate manager of athletics 
here, the office was abolished but 
Lou H. Mahoney, previous Denver 
University star and prominent ref- 
eree of the conference, was ap- 
pointed as assistant director of ath- 
letics and as such will take over 
many of the duties of the previous 
graduate manager. 



Fox Whoopee Film Is 

Booked For America 



You will Look and Feel Better 
after seeing us. 

Elk Barber Shop 

122 East Pikes Peak 



EAT 'EM UP TIGERS 

Then come down and eat 
that tasty 
Confectioii 

AL'S FRENCH 
FRIED POPCORN 

114 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 



PAUDRE-PAUFFE 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Permanent Finger and Water 

Waving 

Manicure and Scalp Treatments 

Marcels 50c. 



The Trip that Bankrupts the 
English Language 

CORLEY 

Mt. Highway 

Cripple Creek in high gear 



LOOK YOURBESl 

Have your hair cut in the 
approved manner. 

Pete's Barber Shop 

8 E. Cucharras St. 



We feel honored . . we've booked 
the comedy riot of all time! 

That master hand of comedy di- 
rectors, Raoul Walsh directed and 
wrote it ... . and made a bigger, 
brighter and more merry all talk- 
ing, laughing Fox Movietone than 
his outstanding "The Cock Eyed 
World." 

Who but Vic McLaglen and EI 
Brendel are in the leading male 
roles! And Fifi Dorsay. that spar- 
kling Mille. of "They Had To See 
Paris" is the leading lady who 
knows how to lead the boys into 
the funniest comedy situations ever 
heard or seen. And those other 
girls: can they make whoopee! And 
those other boys: can they help 
'em! 

Mark the date Saturday Feb. I 
on your calendar — and get there 
early! 

Coming Saturday Feburary 1 — 
"HOT FOR PARIS." 



HOLLY SUGAR 

is 
the Best 

Sugar the essential food. 

HOLLY SUGAR 
CORPORATION 



PLAZA 

DINING 
ROOM 

"The Place to Eat" 

Breakfast Luncheon 

Dinner 



THE TIGER 



Semester Examinations Extolled 
By Critic as Incentive to Study 



By Francis Roberts 
Paraphrasing someone or other: 
"The melancholy days are come, 

the saddest of the year. 
Examinations fast approach, and 
then the grades appear." 
It won't be long now, and here 
am I not knowing whether para- 
mesilun is a term in Caesar or a 
geological strata. However there 
is still a week of grace. Now if I 
were to get down to work, not 
have a date tonight nor tomorrow 
night, cram all of Sunday and stay 
in Sunday evening, work every 
night this coming week and spend 
all leisure hours at the library, I 
should be about half ready for an 
examination in one of my five sub- 
jects. As it is, memory deserts me 
and I recall, with difficulty or not 



DUTCH 



(Hammond) for new driver- 
less cars. 

New Fords 7c per mile; 
30c per hour. 

New Cheve Six's 8c per mile; 
35c per hour. 

Office 

ELK HOTEL 

Phones M. 346 and 2065 
Free Delivery 



Hey-Service 

The 
HEYSE SHEET 
METAL WORKS 

INC. 

219 N.Weber 
• Main 552 



W. I. Lucas 

HAS 

EVERYTHING IN 

SPORTING GOODS 
"Tigers always welcome" 

119 N. Tejon St. 
Main 900 



at all, the things which the instruc- 
tors have preached in class while I 
spent the past four months in 
peaceful slumber. But the awak- 
ening fast approacheth. 

My mind is just a jumbled mass 
of facts from which nothing is dis- 
tinguishable. Yes, I've got to get 
down to work, and I don't mean 
perhaps. So I'll take this history 

book, - . Now that's funny. 

I'd have sworn that the book that 
I bought for this class last fall had 
a red binding. But this says it is 
an English History book so it must 
be the right one, or I wouldn't 
have had it. Anyway ihere goes 

Oh, heck, the pages 

have never been cut. Rather a joke 
on me, as it looks as if I hadn't 
used this book so extensively. Well, 
let's try this German, then. 

Say this German isn't so bad 
once you get started in it. Of 
course I'd get a lot more out of the 
story if I didn't have to skip over 
so many words that I don't know, 
but still I'm getting all hot and 
bothered about what will become of 
that poor little donkey way up on 
the church steeple. I guess Ger- 
man ain't such a bad language af- 
ter all. There goes the telephone. 
Wonder who it is. I'd better an- 

Well it was Betty. And she says 
she's going to the Junior Farce to- 
night with a big date. Gosh, I'll 
bet she has a keen time with Bill. 
Almost wish I was going. And, oh 
yes, she tells me that that book I 
was reading was a French book, 
the one we had last year. Let's 
have a look. Yes, she's right. And 
all this work gone for nothing. I 
wish I hadn't started this darn old 
reviewing at all. But now I sup- 
pose I'd better and I wish I'd 

gone to the Junior Farce, too, for 
I know it will be good. They all 
said it was, those who went last 
night. 

But I'm so resolute. I'll study. 
Maybe someday I'll die from study- 
ing so much. Then they'll all be 
asham Oh, the 'phone 

I'm going. I'm going. I'm go- 
ing. Whoopee. Now I'll have to 
hurry and get into my new long 
dress, no, I guess I'll wear that last 
red one that I got before the long 
one, no, oh get out of the way you 
old German, or rather French book, 
you're always sticking around. Any- 
how I'll study the rest of the week. 
You're darn right I will. When I 
make up my mind I can do it. I've 
got almost a whole week more any- 
how. Well. I'm off. 



Hour Glass 



We are glad to assure the men 
who took part in the championship 
games, that their sweaters and C's 
are forthcoming. The football 
manager says that as soon as he 
can collect sufficient of the out- 
standing pledges to the Athletic 
Association t h e sweaters shall be 
purchased. 

Skates are put on the shelf until 
next winter unless some of winter 
comes back soon. 

Contemporary is getting to be 
quite the fashion among the mas- 
culine element. There were an un- 
usual number of visitors Friday and 
and an especially good program. 
Jan. 22, 1902— 

Silk hats greatly improve the ap- 
pearance of the Junior boys. 
Jan. 29, 1902— 

The Minervans spent a very 
pleasant afternoon with the Con- 
temporary Club last Friday. The 
program was a very interesting one 
and the music furnished by the Col- 
lege orchestra was especially en- 
joyed. 
Jan. 24, 1903— 

The Seniors have decided to give 
a first-class play during Commence- 
ment week. They are enthusiastic, 
and the play will no doubt be a 
howling success. 
Jan. 21, 1903— 

The Seniors gave the Sophomores 
a party Saturday night at Ticknor. 
Every one had a delightful time and 
the ten o'clock bell rang only too 
soon. 
Jan. 23, 1901 — 

The 1901 baseball team has al- 
ready begun work in the gymnasium 
and some idea can be gotten of the 
prospects for this spring. We have 
lost five of our last year's team, in- 
cluding both of our pitchers but 
there seems to be quite a little new 
material to fill up the vacancies. 

A letter has been received from 
Vanderbilt University (Tennessee) 
asking for a football game with us 
next fall. 

Ticknor infirmary is occupied 
now by the victims of the mumps. 
The dread disease is making deep 
inroads on our attendance. 

The Glee Club has reorganized 
and is now doing hard work prep- 
aratory to the spring trip. 

Golf on the campus links is be- 
coming more popular than ever as 
there is hardly an hour during the 
whole day that a few red capped 
or red jacketed enthusiasts may not 
be seen "plowing" the ground or 
looking for lost balls. 



Literary Editor 
Is Off To Orient 

By Thelma Dorroh 
John Haussermann is leaving 
shortly for the Orient. He plans 
to go directly from here to Honolu- 
lu and thence by way of Yokohama 
and Hongkong to Manila to meet 
his family. 

After spending a month or two 
there he will take passage on a 
pearl-fishing schooner and cruise 
about among the Islands of the 

I Philippines. Later, going into the 

I interior of the Igorot country, he 
will study the primitive customs of 

t the inhabitants and take some mo- 
tion pictures of them and of the 

! surrounding scenes for the Anthro- 
pology class at Colorado College. 

While in Igorot, Haussermann is 
going to make a collection of t h e 
native folk-lore and folk-songs and 
sometime in the future he hopes to 
weave them into a symphonic ar- 
rangement similar to Dvorak's 
"American Symphony" which is 
based on the folk-melodies of the 
American negro. 

It is Haussermann's belief that 
the ideal traveler, carrying with 
him only a few necessities, seeks 
the out-of-way places of the earth, 
and strives by unobtrusive observa- 
tion and sympathy to gain an in- 
sight into the lives of the people 
among whom he sojourns.. 

Last winter, from material gath- 
ered while wandering from town to 
town along the New England sea- 
coast, Haussermann wrote a story 
entitled "From a New England Por- 
trait." At present he is working on 
a story dealing with the unknown 
phases of life in New York city, 
which the more sophisticated writ- 
ers are unable to see or do not 
mention. 

And in the future, ,he declares he 
is going to write an article dealing 
with the ideal college ... "a place 
where there won't be any long. 
sleepy lectures, or any final exam- 
inations." 



When a Chicagoan gets into trou- 
ble he is too prone to consult those 
well known lawyers. Smith & Wes- 
son. 



When you consider that you 
can purchase any make t]rpe- 
writer on monthly paymenb 
as small as $5.00 it is not a 
question of affording it 

The essential question is if 
you can afford to be without 



The 

Typewriter 

Man 



} 125 N. Tejon 
t 



Main 95 



THE TIGER 



Member of Rocky Mountain 

Inter-Collegiate Press 

Association 




The Colorado College 

Newspaper, 

Published Weekly by the 

Students. 



SHORT STORY CONTEST 



THE TIGER 

Articles intended for publication should be left in the Tiger Box, on the first 
floor of Cobum library, by Wednesday noon. No unsigned contributions will be 
published. 



LLOYD H. ELLIS Main 1975 Editor 

James Keyser Associate Editor Barratt O'Hara Desk Editor 

Chauncey H. Blodgett, Jr Sport Editor Margaret Gillen Society Editor 

Mark Perkinson Feature Editor John W. Haussermann, Jr Lit. Editor 



PAT PATTERSON ....Main 2575 Manager 



PAY TELEPHONES. 

In this issue of the Tiger, there is an article in the "Voice of the 
Students" which deplores the pay telephone system now in vogue in 
the women's dormitories. Women, who pay over a hundred dollars a 
year for their homes, are forced to pay an additional cost of five cents 
every time they use a telephone. This seems an unfair practice in the 
operation of the dormitories. 

It is true that public hotels charge their guests for telephone serv- 
ice, but dormitories are neither hotels nor are the women, guests. Room 
rent should niclude telephone service, and to charge for town calls seems 
an injustice. 



THE RED LANTERN CLUB. 

Who knows what the Red Lantern Club is? Heretofore, the aver- 
age student has heard of it as an organization that pledges twelve 
prominent men from the senior class, initiates these pledges by making 
them carry red lanterns around the campus for one evening and has 
its group picture in the Nugget. 

This year, the Red Lantern Club has started on an ambitious pro- 
gram. Its proposal that there be two required assemblies a week, that 
there be no dating at basketball games, and that there be better sports- 
manship at athletic contests should be commended. 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS. 

That some one should take a stand on the honor system and cheat- 
ing at Colorado College has been the wish of the fair and honorable 
students for no little time. Just what is the system of supervising ex- 
aminations at Colorado College is a question. Some professors watch 
diligently over their pupils; others pass out examination questions and 
leave the room. Obviously, there is no harmony in this system. A 
freshmen when asked about the honor system at Colorado College is at 
loss to describe it; the upperclassmen laughs at such a question. He 
says there is no such system. 

The present practice of supervising examinations is absolutely un- 
fair to the student who gets his lesson from day to day, studies for the 
final, and then has to compete with a fellow student who has cut half 
his classes, and has prepared for his final by making an elaborate set 
of crib notes so that he will have the course "well in hand." Some 
will say that it is only in grades that the unfair student succeeds, that 
the unfair student gets nothing out of his cheating but a good grade, 
and that will help him but little after he leaves college. 

But grades mean a great part in the college curriculum. It is the 
visible wage that the student receives for his semester's work. And 
back of that grade is more than an "A" or a "D." Students who in- 
tend to do graduate work are chosen more on account of their good 
grades than by any other standard. To secure a good fellowship, a 
student must have exceptionally high grades. When one sees a fellow 
student take his grammar book, an elaborate set of notes and one or 
two blue books to the final examination, and then pay an "above-the- 
average" student several dollars to sit by him and help him, he sees 
the injustice of the whole system. When he sees the same student 
commended by the professor for writing such a good test, it makes him 
a bit cynical. 

These incidents have occured more than a few times. Primarily, 
the students are to blame for this cheating. In their eyes the only bad 
part of it is getting caught, and, to be fair to the students who work 
and try, it is only right that they be caught. 



By Hermina Kahn 
Rules governing the short story 
contest, for which John Hausser- 
mann, sophomore of Colorado Col- 
lege, has donated a prize of fifty 
dollars, have been drawn up by the 
committee of judges. They are as 
follows : 

1. All manuscripts must be in the 
hands of the committee by May 
10. They may be handed to 
Miss Amanda M. Ellis, Mr. A- 
H. Daehler, Mr. M. R. Rose, or 
Mr. Lloyd Shaw. 

2. T h e manuscripts shall be 
typewritten, double-spaced, on 
one side of the paper, and shall 
not contain the name of the 
author. An envelope, sealed, con- 
taining the name of the author, 
shall be submitted with each 
manuscript. 

3. Stories shall range in length 
from 1 ,000 to 6,000 words. 

4. Only unpublished manuscripts 
will be considered. Contestants 
may enter as many as three 
stories. 

5. The judges will confer in award- 
in the prize, and may withhold 
the prize if no stories are 
deemed worthy. 

6. The winning story will be pub- 
lished in "The Tiger"; other 
stories will remain the property 
of the writers. 



Denver, Colo., R. M. I. P. A.— 
The Interschool Council here decid- 
ed that James Grace shall receive 
$25 a month for his services as stu- 
dent manager, an office which was 
only recently created. In this posi- 
tion, Grace is in charge of the fi- 
nances of every organization on the 
campus with the exception of the 
fraternities, the sororities, and the 
two Christian associations. 



Then He Went to Work on the 
Pocketbook 

"That will be enough out of 
you," said the doctor as he stitched 
up his patient. 



Hershey Given Leave 
Of Absence For Tou 



Dr. Charlie Brown Hershey, Dea 
and Professor of Education i 
Colorado College, has recently a< 
cepted an invitation to join a sma 
group of American teachers an 
educators who are to make a toi 
of Germany next summer. Th 
members of the party organized ui 
der the director of the Internation; 
Institute of Columbia University i 
cooperation with the Zentral-Inst 
tute of Germany and under the au: 
pices of the Prussian Minister c 
Education will sail from New Yor 
on June 12. The educational toi 
of Germany will begin at Breme 
on June 22, and will continue fc 
six weeks ending in Berlin early i 
August. The German tour will b 
under the immediate direction c 
German educational officials. D 
Hershey 's interest in German educi 
tion will be chiefly in the secondai 
and higher schools. 

In recognition of this honor coi 
ferred upon Dean Hershey and ii 
directly upon Colorado College an 
in order to permit him to use t 
the fullest possible advantage tl 
opportunities afforded by a trip 1 
Europe, the Trustees have grante 
him leave of absence for the fir 
semester of the academic ye< 
1 930-3 1 . Accordingly upon t h 
completion of the German educj 
tional tour. Dean Hershey plans 1 
visit one or more of the Scandin; 
vian countries, England, Franc 
Switzerland and probably Ital; 
While no definite itinerary h< 
been worked out, it is his purpos 
to spend from four to six weeks : 
each of three or four of thei 
countries and a shorter period < 
time in one or two of the other 
Here again he intends especially 1 
study secondary and higher educj 
tion. 

Mrs. Hershey expects to accon 
pany him on the trip. 



VOICE) OF The Stujdemt^ 



PAY TELEPHONES 

Probably one of the greatest 
sources of annoyances with which 
the Hall girls has to contend is the 
Nickle Telephone. Various meas- 
ures have been brought up at dif- 
ferent intervals in an attempt to 
abolish them, but each time these 
have failed due to non-cooperation 
on the part of those concerned. 

It seems that the general expense 
of attending college need not be 
still further exaggerated by this ad- 
ditional expense. The average girl 
spends 35 cents a week for calls. 
Added to this is the fact of its be- 
ing one of the greatest nuisances 



imaginable. Often one does n( 
have the correct change and a gre. 
inconvenience is experienced ovi 
as simple a matter as calling f( 
a marcel appointment. 

Pay telephones do not have I 
remain. The State Teacher's Co 
lege abolished their's early in th 
fall and the State Agricultural Co 
lege followed suit. It is now up I 
the women students of Colorac 
College to promote a petition as) 
ing the removal of these Nick 
'phones. It is up to them to mal 
this petition so strong that its in 
mediate effect will be the takiii 
out of these telephones. — R. V. 



THE TIGER 



6A 



BUSY CORNER 
SHOE SHOP 

Shines — Shoe Repairs 
And Hats Blocked 



Under New Management 

The College 
Barber Shop 

R .Iph Schildknecht, Proprietor 

103 E. Cache la Poudre 
Colorado Springs 




CAME 



in a Saunders System car, and 
take a gang of rooters with you. 
Make 'em kick in for a share of 
the expense and all travel for less 
than railway fare. Ask about low 
long trip rates on Model A Fords 
and new Chryslers. 



D. C. Hutchin^s 

Manager 

21 No. Cascade Ave. 
Phone Main 1800 



5AVNDERS 



Yourseuj 



SYSTEM 



New Courses to be Offered Next Semester 



Impressionism. 

painting in Europe. Brief re 

view of American art. Second 

semester. 

1 1 . Art Appreciation — Prerequisite, 
Art 13. An appreciative study 
of painting, graphic arts, sculp- 
ture, architecture, and design. 
A study of a work of art from 
the standpoint of an aesthetic 
orgr.nization as exemplified in 
the schools and individuals of 
the past and present civiliza- 
tions. Lectures and recita- 
tions. First semester. 
ASTRONOMY— Albright 

2. The Sidereal Universe — The 
sun and stars, constitution, and 
relationship, motions, distances, 
and spectral classification. The- 
ories of the universe and its 
evolution. Lectures and reci- 
te tions. Open to those who 
have had a general course in 
f stronomy. Astronomy 1 , or 
thorough work in physics. Sec- 
ond semester. 

BIBLICAL LITERATURE — Mc- 
Murtry 

I I . The Teachings of Jesus — With 
special reference to their bear- 
ing on modern social problems 
as seen in the light of His own 
day and ours. Lectures and 
text-books. Open to all stu- 
dents. One semester. 

19. The Apostolic Age — ^The begin- 
nings of Christianity. Prelim- 
inary outlines of the condition 
of the Roman world, and of 
the life of Jesus, followed by a 
study of the rapid spread of 
the teaching of Jesus as applied 
by His first followers. Open to 

1 ?1 students. Second semester. 

28. History of Religions — A study 
of the development of the great 
religions of the world, with 
such ethical analysis as may be 
necessary for comparison with 
Biblical values; to widen his- 
torical information and to em- 
phasize the place the Bible 
holds in religion. Text-Books, 
lectures, and assigned readings. 
Open to juniors and seniors. 
One semester. 

BIOLOGY 

34. General Limnology — Prereq- 
isite, Biology 1 and one addi 
tional year of biology. An in- 
troduction to the study of life 
of inland waters. Life histor- 
ies, and ecological relations of 
aquatic organisms. Second se 
mester. Lectures and recita 
tions, 3 hours; field and lab 
oratory work, 4 hours; credit 
— Mr. Gilmore. 
3. Morphology of the Seed Plants 
— Prerequisite, Biology I . This 
course deals primarily with the 
structure of the seed plants, 



(Continued from page 3) 
Contemporary but serves also to introduce the 

student to the physiological ac- 
tivities, ecological relationships, 
evolution, and classification of 
this group. Second semester. 
Lectures and recitations, 3 
hours; laboratory and field 
work, 3 hours. — Mr. Penland. 
38. Mycology — A general survey 
of all the groups of fungi with 
special emphasis on the field of 
phytopathology. Prerequisites, 
Biology 3 and Biology 31 or 
their equivalent. Lectures and 
recitations, 2 hours; laboratory 
and field, 4 hours.— Mr. Pen- 
land. 

CHEMISTRY 

4. Quantitative Analysis — Pre- 
requisite, Chemistry 3. — Mr. 
Barnes. 

(a) A study of gravmetric 
and volumetric methods of 
quantitc.tive analysis, including 
reactions, stoichiometry, and 
analytical theory. Second se- 
mester. Lectures or recitations, 
2 hours; laboratory, 8 hours. — 
Mr. Barnes. 

(b) A continuation of course 
4 (a). The analysis of natur- 
al and manufactured products 
such as ores, minerals, and al- 
loys; also a study of the chem- 
ical reactions involved and the 
principles of the separation of 
of the common elements. Each 
semester. Credit and fees to 
be arranged. — Mr. Barnes. 

5. Organic Chemistry — Prereq- 
uisite, Chemistry 3. — Mr. 
Barnes. 

(a) A study of both the ali- 
phatic and aromatic com- 
pounds, including methods of 
preparation, properties, uses, 
and characteristic reactions. 
Lectures and recitations, 3 
hours; credit. — Mr. Barnes. 

(b) Must accompany 5(a). 
Laboratory work in the prep- 
aration of the more important 
types of organic compounds, 
giving familiarity with different 
apparatus, reactions, and oper- 
ations involved. Each semes- 
ter. Laboratory, 1 afternoon, 
credit. — Mr. Barnes. 

13. Metallurgy — Prerequisite, 
Prerequisite, Chemistry I or 2. 
A study of the manufacture 
and properties of iron and 
steel, the processes of extrac- 
tion of copper, lead, zinc, gold, 
and silver, and the nature and 
properties of alloys. Second 
semester. Lectures, recitations, 
and assigned reading. — Mr. 
Douglas. 

25. Research Chemistry — May be 

elected only by permission of 

the instructor in charge. Work 

may be chosen in inorganic or 

(Continued from page tiA) 



THE 



Crissey & Fowler 

LUMBER CO. 

MILL WORK 
BUILDERS' SUPPLIES 



Main 101 
1I7-127W. Vermijo 



You may save with this Associa- 
tion, any amount from one dollai 
up per week or month. 

We invite college students to call 
at our office (Ground floor loca 
tion) I 16 North Tejon Street, Colo- 
rado Springs. 

E. C. SHARER. President 
1 16 North Tejon Street 



This week's Candy Special 

Bitter 
Sweets 



40c lb. 



Barthel'S 

Tejon Street at 
Acacia Park Comer 



E. L. Bruce 

BARBER SHOP 

28 E.Kiowa 



Tonight is 

College 
Night— 

with Darwin Coit's Orches- 
tra from 8 to 12 at the 

Cflhaprl inn 

Pikes Peak at Weber 

Cover Charge 
50c 



6B 



THE TIGER 



Broken Lenses Duplicated 

Save the Pieces 

Eyes examined Lenses Ground 




THE LAUTERMAN-DUGAN 

JEWELRY AND OPTICAL CO. 

Jewelers, Optometrists and 

Mfg. Opticians 

Fme Watch, Clock and Jewelry 

Repairing 
121 N. Tejon St. Rhone Main 674 



FRANK SARLAS & CO. 

Shoe Shining and Repairing 

Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Quick Service 

132 E. Pikes Peak 



%OMtUk 




TENT €^ AWNING CO 



Awnings and Camp Supplies 



Albums Become 
Picture Records 
of School Life 

From among many types 
of Kodak Albums you can 
pick one whioh will be al- 
most priceless in future 
years when you look back 
on school days. 

Instead of trying to keep 
Kodak prints loose — sub- 
ject to loss or damage — 
put them away permanent- 

ly. 



Sheaffer, Wahl and Parker 
Fountain Pens and Pencils 




K^w Courses to be Offered Next Semester 



17 N. Tejon 



(Continued from page 6A)^ 
organic or physical chemistry. 
The problems will be taken up 
with an aim to help the stu- 
dent acquaint himself with the 
methods ordinarily used in the 
attack of an original problem. 
Credit fees to be arranged. — 
Mr. Douglas, Mr. Barnes. 
CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Professor Okey, Professor Albright, 
' Mr. Page 

20. Railway Surveying — ^Theory of 
simple, compound, and transi- 
tion curves, vertical curves, 
frogs, switches, and crossings; 
reconnaissaince; preliminary 
survey; maps and profiles; lo- 
cation ; cross-sections ; earth- 
work computations; mass dia- 
grams.. Second semester. Rec- 
itations, field work, lectures, 
and problems, 3 hours. Slec- 
tive for civil engineers. 

4 1 . Hydraulics — Elective for en- 
gineers. Theory of the me- 
chanics of liquids, dealing prin- 
cipally with water. Flow of 
water in open and closed chan- 
nels, and through pipes and 
orifices. Measurement of flow 
and pressures. Design of pipes, 
conduits, and channels. Sec- 
ond semester. Recitations, 
lectures, and problems. 

81. Mechanics of Materials. 
ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Abbott, Professor Swart, 

Associate Professor Mautner, 

Miss van Diest 

Business 1 7. Elementary Account- 
ing. -^ Mr. Drucker or Mr. 
Swan. 

Business 25. Sales Management — 
Prerequisite, Business 108. — - 
Mr. Swan. 

Economics 4 — Corporation Finance 
and Business Organization — 
Prerequisite, Economics 1. — 
Mr. Swart. 

Business 18. Factory Management 
— Prerequisite, Business 1. 

Business 31. Business Policies — 
Open by permission of the in- 
structor. 

Business 202. Seminar — Mr. 
Drucker. 

EDUCATION 

10. Mental Tests — Prerequisite, 
Psychology 1 .— Mr. Ellis. 

13. The Psychology of School Sub- 
jects — Prerequisite, Psychology 
I .—Mr. Ellis. 

14. Organization and Administra- 
tion of Education. — Mr. Her- 
shey. 

16. Problems in American Educa- 
tion — Prerequisite, 6 hours in 
education. — Mr. Hershey or 
Mr. Ellis. 

ENGLISH 
8. The Continental Short-Story. — 
Miss Ellis. 25 



36. The Development of English 

Drama. — Mr. Ranson. 
41a. The Contemporary Drama. — 

Mr. Goodenough. 
41b. Recent Poetry and Prose. — 

Mr. Goodenough. 
49. Playmaking and Production. — 

Mr. Goodenough. 

51. Mythology. — Mr. Rose. 

52. Early English Literature in 
Translation. — Miss Ellis. 

FORESTRY 

Professor Parker, Assistant Proles- 

sor Wagar 
15. Wood Identification. 

GEOLOGY 

Professor Keyte, Assistant Profes- 
sor Mathias 
1 1 . Structural Geology. 



28, 



47, 



GRAPHICS— Okey 
4. Graphic Statics. 

GREEK 

Professor H. E. Mierow, Professor 

C. C. Mierow, and Miss Breeze 

3. Drama.— Mr. H. E. Mierow. 

HISTORY 

8. Roman History. — Miss Breeze. 

24. The World War and its After- 
math — Prerequisite, History 
la.— Mr. Fuller. 
Development of the English 
Constitution — Prerequisite, one 
year's work in history or polit- 
ical science. 

Development of American Nat- 
ionality — Prerequisite, History 
2.— Mr. Hulbert. 

20. The Teaching of History. — Mr. 
Binkley. 

MATHEMATICS 

1 . College Algebra. — Mr. Sisam, 
Mr. Albright, Mr. Lovitt, Mr. 
Parker, Miss Hood, Miss Bel- 
schner. 

Solid Analytic Geometry. — Mr. 
Sisam. 

Mathematical Theory of Invest- 
ments. — Mr. Albright. 
Statistical Methods. — Mr. Lov- 
itt. 

PHILOSOPHY— Wilm. 

2. Introduction to Philosophy. 
4a. History of Modern Philosophy. 

20. American Philosophy — Prereq- 
uisite, 6 hours in philosophy. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

2. Experimental Psychology. — 
Mr. Ellis. 

1 1 . The Psychology of Individual 
Differences — Prerequisite Psy- 
chology 1. — Mr. Ellis. 



28. Alternating Current Labora- 
tory. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE— Bramhall 
3. Comparative European Govern- 
ment — Prerequisites, Political 
Science 1 a and History 1 a. 

ANTHROPOLOGY — Continued 
from last semester, but open to 
those who wish to begin second 
semester.— Mr. Abbott and Mr. 
Postlethwaite. 

Photographs of our Colorado j 
mountains. Nicely made — » 
attractively colored by hand, j 
Moderate in price — framed 
or unframed. 

il. L. STANDLE^ 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs 




DIOS- 

S£/fV/C£ 

TIRES 
BICYCLES- GAS & OIL 

GARAGE TIRE SERVICE 

CORDUROY CORDS 

Sidewall Protection 



14. 



18. 



20. 



We Make a Specialty of 

CLEANING AND DYEING MEN'S 

AND WOMEN'S SHOES 

GOLDEN CYCLE SHINE PARLOR 

Todd Colbert 

Lobby Golden Cycle Bldg. 
Tejon and Pikes Peak 



pinions 

/■" Pure Milk 



PHYSICS 

. Electricity and Magnetism. — 
Mr. Boucher. 

and 16. Physical Seminar. — 
Mr. Boucher and Mr. Olson. 

. Thesis — Credit arranged in- 
dividually. 
Illumination. 



THE TIGER 



Youth Is So Optimistic 

Did you hear about the college 
boy who on an auto trade-in wanted 
the dealer to give him a hundred 
dollars extra for The Tiger wise- 
cracks on it? 



•You're Sure They're Pure" 

Pecan Cream 
Squares at 35clb. 

A delicious variation of 
the famous Pecan Loaf 
in convenient square 
morsels, the feature for 
Saturday, the 25th. 



Derm's 



SEE THE FIRST 

Intra- 
mural 

BASKETBALL 
GAMES 

FEBRUARY 6 
Seven P. M. 

Cossitt Gym 

PHI GAMMA DELTA 

vs. 

DELTA ALPHA PHI 
PI KAPPA ALPHA 

vs. 

INDEPENDENTS 

ADMISSION 

10c 



Young Gets Doctor's 

Degree In California 



William G. Young, who graduat- 
ed from Colorado College in 1924, 
securing the degree of Master of 
Arts from Colorado College in 
1925, has recently secured the ad- 
vanced degree of Doctor of Philos- 
ophy from the California Institute 
of Technology. He has also been 
appointed National Research Coun- 
cil Fellow to work at Stanford Uni- 
versity during the present academic 
year. His special interest lies in the 
same field in which Dr. James H. 
C. Smith, formerly a member of 
the Faculty of Colorado College in 
the Department of Chemistry, has 
recently made so brilliant a dis- 
covery. Dr. Young is a pupil of Dr. 
F. W. Douglas, head of the Depart- 
ment of Chemistry at Colorado Col- 
lege. 



Josef Hofmann Great 

Success In Recital 



Under the auspices of the Civic 
Concerts, Josef Hofmann, brilliant 
pianist, gave a recital at the City 
Auditorium last evening. His mas- 
tery of the piano set him apart as 
one of the greatest musicians who 
was ever heard in the auditorium. 



University Still Has 

Trouble With Council 



Boulder, Colo — Since enthusiasm 
reached s'uch a point last fall at 
Colorado University that rotten eggs 
were very much in prominence, the 
student affairs have been under a 
provisional government and no 
election has been held due to reg- 
ulations of the administration. 

However at a meeting of the pro- 
visional student council and of the 
faculty advisory council, plans were 
presented for campus government 
and await ratification by these two 
councils before they are presented 
to President Norlin for final appro- 
val. 



CADILLAC 

and 

CHRYSLER 

MOTORCARS 

Adams Motor Co. 

Marksheffel Building 



No "Vare" to Sit 

You've heard of "Amateur 
Night," "Gift Night," "Radio 
Night," "Opportunity Night" and 
what not at the movie houses, but 
one enterprising manager tells us 
that Saturday at his house is "Vare 
Night" because it's hard to get a 
seat. 



Official Notices 



The final date for having Nug- 
get Pictures taken is Saturday, 
January 25. No pictures will be ac- 
cepted after that date. — William 
Pales, Manager. 



Frank Geddy Says- , 

'Hope 
you all hit the finals for a 
high-mark — and the Tigers 
get Hot and win the next 
basketball game.' 

The Shoe Shop 

Across from the High School 



Special for 
Saturday 

ASSORTED CREAM 

CARAMELS 

49c lb. 

HUGHES 
CHOCOLATES 



=\. 



r^ 



=^ 




RADIO 



Victor. Majestic 
Atwater Kent .^_ 
Croslcy and 1117 
Brunswick 
113-115 N. Tejon 



Here's Your 

VICTOR 
RECORD 



Come in and hear 
the latest releases in 
our ventilated trial 



ggHgss 

FVRNITVRE ^V. 



^ 



Repairs and Adjustments — 
on Any MaJ^e Fountain Pen 

If your Fountain Pen isn't working as it should— 
regardless of the make — we can make adjustments or 
repairs necessary to put it in order again. 

We carry quite a number of parts, also the kind 
of inks that should be used in pens. And we have 
an unusually large stock of pens and pencils of fam- 
ous makes. 



SATISFACTION in note- 
book work comes with 
the use of best quality of 
binders and fillers. We have 
the genuine Irving-Pitt sup- 
plies which cost no more than 
others. 



Printing tf 

SXAnONEiRYCa 

Crtorado Springs Cola 



TOR YOUR CONVENIENCE" 

We Dry Clean 

'Thone us first" 




Gents' 




Hats 


' 


Topcoats 




Tuxedos 


1 


aove« 




Ties 


1 


Etc. 




Sweaters 


! 




ii 
1 



8 



THE TIGER 



Chapel Inn 

Colorado College students who 
attended the dinner dance at t h e 
Chapel Inn, last Friday evening in- 
cluded Katherine McTigue, Mar- 
garet Crissman, Margaret Killian, 
Dorothy Horn, Edith Blotz, Martha 
Howbert, Josephine Campbell. 
Alyce Ireland, Phyllis Ormsby, 
Ruth Tom Frame, Myra Reinking, 
Catherine Poland, Jean Critz, Glen 
Wade, Barratt O'Hara, Lloyd 
Ellis, David Scott, Bruce Gray, Ar- 
thur Kelly, T. Ernest Nowels, Jr., 
Gilbert Rice, Kenneth Stone, Wil- 
liam Haney, Donald Haney, Elvin 
Griffith, Charles Wilgus, David 
Hancock, Frederick Short, John 
Brown, John Critz, Dale Merritt, 
Harvey Reinking, Bob Merritt, 
John Metzler, Rupert McClung, 
Richard Vanderhoof, Roy Vanden- 
burg, Joseph Rohrer, James Ma- 
gruder. 

Muienra Tea Dance 

A tea dance will be held at the 
Minerva club house, Thursday, 
January 30. The affair is a sub- 
scription dance, and an admission 
fee of fifty cents per couple will 
be charged. 

Miss Mary Strachan went to 
Denver, Tuesday to attend presen- 
tations of the Shakespearian plays 
given by the Stratford players at 
the Broadway theater. Miss Strach- 
an is a member of the junior class 
and of Koshare, and is active in 
college dramatics. 



SOCIETY 



Copeland Attends Meeting 

Mr. William Copeland, secretary 
of the Colorado College Alumni 
Association, will leave today for 
Denver where he will attend a reg- 
ional meeting of alumni secretaries. 
Delegates from Colorado, Wyo- 
ming, New Mexico, Utah, and 
North and South Dakota will be 
present. 

A letter has just been received 
from E. V. Graham '27, who was 
a star athlete at Colorado College 
in his day. At present, Graham is 
a licensed pilot and is an officer 
of the Arizona Aircraft Company in 
Phoenix. He is also an assistant 
coach at the Phoenix Junior Col- 
lege. 

An announcement of the birth of 
a baby girl to Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Hampton of Las Vegas, N. M. has 
been received at the Phi Gam 
house. 

Vern Eastman, a former Colo- 
rado College student, will return to 
school next semester. Mr. East- 
man is a member of the Phi Delta 
Theta fraternity. 

Clarence Reams is also expected 
to return to Colorado College for 
the second term. Mr. Reams is a 
Phi Gamma Delta. 



Sigma Chi Holds Apache Dance 

The Sigma Chi fraternity held an 
Apache dance at the chapter house 
last Saturday night. The guests 
were the Misses Maxine Moore, Eu- 
nice Dick, Joy McNeill, Dorothy 
Neal, Charlotte Pipkin, Patricia 
Johnson, Marian MacMillan, Mar- 
garet Sutton, Margaret Crissman, 
Katherine Herbert, Miriam Lock- 
hart, Elsie Behuke, Audrey Hall, 
Eleanor Watts, Mary Pitts, Kay Po- 
land, Thelma Hamilton, Effie Gil- 
bert, Melba Adams, Lillian Gibbs, 
Sally Oliver, Gladys Johnston, 
Dorothy Chamberlain, Jane Ewing, 
Dorothy Faus, Helen Hummel, Lor- 
raine Dean, Myra Reinking, Elsie 
Winship, Lois Wiley, Priscilla Todd, 
Mr. and Mrs. Ira B. Hodge, Mr. and 
Mrs. P. Sutton, Mr. and Mrs. J. 
Cronath, Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Pot- 
ter, Mr. and Mrs: F. M. Okey, F. E. 
Beyle, Al Williams, Jack Miller, 
Charles Page. 

Dr. Gilmore will leave for Chi- 
cago Thursday to attend a meeting 
of the North Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools. 
He will be a member of the Com- 
mittee on Athletics. 

Glenn Wade and Barratt O'Hara 
visited the stock show in Denver 
last Sunday. 



Broadmoor 

Among the Colorado College pec 
pie who attended the dance at th 
Broadmoor hotel, Saturday evenin 
were Elizabeth Crannell, Lois See 
bach, Sally Sheldon, Jo Campbel 
Margaret Killian, Ruth Tom Frame 
William Leslie, Max Keyte, Mow 
bray Drummond, James Magrudei 
Roy Vandenburg, Richard Vandei 
hoof, Bruce Gray, David Scott. 

Ed Burno is now attending co: 
lege at the Colorado School c 
Mines. 

John Strachan, now enrolled i 
the University of Denver, expecl 
to return to school here next seme: 
ter. 



DEBATERS GO TO DENVER 



Members of the Colorado Colleg 
chapter of Tau Kappa Alpha, na 
ional debating fraternity, were th 
guests of the Denver Universit 
chapter at a banquet held in Der 
ver last Saturday evening. A r( 
port was given by Denver's delegat 
to the national convention held la: 
month. Plans for the Colorado Vk 
bate Conference, to be held here i 
February, were outlined by the ( 
C. representatives. 

Those present from this scho( 
were: W. D. Copeland, Arthv 
Baylis, Roland Anderson, Nelso 
Brown, and Bert Vandervleit. 






SEVEN ACES ORCHESTRA. Columbia Record Artists are now on an extended engagement at the 
Cosmopolitan Hotel, Denver and are arranging a new series of Friday and Saturday night dances 
in the Arabian Room. 



THE TIGER 



COVERS 
ALL THE FIELD 



SPORTS 



BASKETBALL 
CROSS COUNTRY EQUITATION 



Shoe Rebuilding 

Shines 

Hats Qeaned and Blocked 

BUSY CORNER SHOE SHOP 

104 E. Pikes Peak Phone M. 689-W 




S er vices f o r your 
car that includes 

Proper Lubrication 

100% Alemite 

LEADING MOTOR OILS 

Weaverized Washing 

Tire Repairing Road Service 

Drive in Today 



FIRESTONE TIRES 
117 N.Nevada Phone M. 202 



Quality 

Cleaners and Dyers 

SUITS, O'COATS 

HATS $1.25 

U-Fone 1-8-1-1 We'll Call 

H. A. Thompson 
10 E. Kiowa 



WHY NOT 

Learn Typewriting 
while attending Col- 
lege? Your teachers 
will appreciate type- 
written work to be 
checked. We can ar- 
range hours to suit 
your convenience. 




Pioneers Defeat 
Tigers, 26 to 20 

By Ivan Schweninger 

Plenty of Tiger snap and fight 
was not enough to beat the smooth 
Pioneer machine, and the red-clad 
basketeers came out ahead last 
Saturday 26-20. A seemingly un- 
faltering jinx wasn't with the Tig- 
ers. Denver jumped into the lead 
in the first minute of play and was 
never headed. Ketchum, lanky 
Pioneer center, got the tip-off a 
great part of the time, setting into 
action a quick passing system which 
could be offset only by an hour 
of uncanny alertness such as t h e 
Tigers displayed. Denver present- 
ed an almost impenetrable defense 
that forced the Tigers to long shots. 
Only Ryerson seemed to have ihis 
eye set on the hoop. He played the 
best game of his spectacular young 
career, leading the Tiger scoring 
with four baskets and two free 
throws and turning in an evening 
of superb floor play. 

Captain Clark lifted his shots in 
his easy manner time and again but 
always missed the hoop by that 
hair-splitting fraction that holds 
everyone breathless. He went 
scoreless. Although covered by one 
of the most solid defenses in t h e 
state, the Dutchman seemed always 
to come out of the numerous rough 
scrambles in possession of the ball, 
and handling himself with more or 
less cat-like agility, passed like 
'ightning through a mass of red that 
was the quickly shifting Pioneer de- 
fense. 

Ingraham had an .hour of credit- 
able basketball against the Pio- 
neers, sinking three field goals and 
a free throw. Reid, at guard, was 
up in the air after back-board 
shots, and with all their height, the 
Queen City boys were often cut out 
in their attempts to recover their 
shots. Well covered every minute 
of the game. Waters succeeded in 
slipping through the Pioneer de- 
fense to score only once. He was 
taken from the game on personal 
fouls. Eleven fouls were chalked 
up against the Tigers; eight against 
the Pioneers. Doyle had little 
chance to help matters m the few 
minutes he played after Waters left 
the game. 

This defeat practically ends 
Tiger chances for the Eastern Di- 
vision Championship. 

There's a monument waiting for 
the man who invents an auto door 
that a weak chap can open. — Will 
Rogers. 



Fraternity Basket Race 
To Be Close Struggle 



By Kendrick Stone 
From all present prospects t h e 
race for the Interfraternity basket- 
ball flag will be a fight to the very 
end. Every organization will be 
represented by exceptionally strong 
teams. In all probability the Sig- 
ma Chi's will be the favorites as 
they have shown their strength in 
several post-season games thus far, 
and they look much stronger this 
year than they did last when they 
copped the championship. How- 
ever they will receive considerable 
competition from all the other or- 
ganizations, especially the Phi 
Delts, Phi Gams, and Kappa Sigs, 
who also boast of stronger teams 
than they had m the race last year. 
There is probably more interest 
shown in the race for the Inter- 
fraternity basketball championship 
than in any other intra-mural 
sports, and the present season prom- 
ises to be one of the best from the 
spectators' viewpoint. The follow- 
ing organizations will be represent- 
ed: Phi Delta Theta, Phi Gamma 
Delta, Kappa Sigma, Beta Theta 
Pi, Sigma Chi, Pi Kappa Alpha, 
Delta Alpha Phi, and Independents. 
Doc Weaver is manager this year 
and he will be assisted by Bruce 
Gray. 



What Price College Loaf? 

And another reason why only 
2I/2 per cent of our people are col- 
lege bred is that the other 97J/2 
per cent can't raise the dough. 



De Paul-Tiger Data 



Box score: 
TIGERS 
Waters, f. - 
Ingraham, f. 
Doyle, f. - 
Clark, c. - - 
Ryerson, g. - 
Hinkley, g. - 
Reid, g. - - 



f. t. p. f. 
2 2 



5 12 10 

De PAUL f. g. f. t. p. f. 

Coan, f. - - - - 10 1 2 

J. O'Connor, f. - 2 I 

Ascher, c. - - - 1 4 

Bud O'Connor, c. - I I 

Powers, g. - - - I 4 

Rondanella. g. - - 

Joe O'Connor, g. - I I 3 

15 4 14 

Referee: Vidal, C. U.; Hakanson, 
Denver 'Y'. 



CHICAGO SQUAD DOWNS 
TIGER HOOPSTERS, 34-22 



Displaying the smoothest, and 
yet the most deliberate, passing at- 
tack that has been seen on the lo- 
cal court in some time ,the De Paul 
quintet finished off the Tigers last 
Tuesday night by a 34-22 score. 
The Blue Devils had a deadly pass- 
ing formation that looked almost 
slow, and yet got the ball within 
scoring distance two times to t h e 
Tigers* one. 

The Tigers spent the better part 
of the game trying to break up the 
passing of their opponents, which 
was cautious to the extreme. The 
first half went slowly, with De Paul 
jumping into the lead thru the ef- 
forts of Coan, slippery forward, but 
a' few baskets and a handful of free 
throws enabled the Bengals to tie 
the score, 12-12, as the half ended. 

Coan continued his scoring spree 
in the second half, and the invaders 
loosened up their offense with fatal 
effects. De Paul took the lead 
soon after the opening of the sec- 
ond heat, and drew farther away as 
the periods wore on. 

Dutch Clark found the hoop five 
times during the game, many of 
these shots being spectacular one 
handed push shots from a distance. 
Ernie Waters and Ingraham, on the 
other hand, seemed hurried, and 
connected for less than a .half doz- 
en points between them. 

Reid and Ryerson did well, but 
the invaders passing attack was out- 
side of their territory for a good 
part of the game, and came in near 
the basket only when there was a 
sizable opening. The former played 
at center for the better part of the 
game, dropping gack to guard after 
the tip-off. Ryerson started the 
ball down the floor several times 
with fast dribbling, but the Blue 
Devils kept him at too safe a dis- 
tance to allow him to shoot. 

Powers, captain of the opposing 
team, led the passing for them. He, 
and a trio of O'Connors kept the 
ball in motion until one of them 
were able to pass to Coen in the 
open, or take a pot-shot themselves. 

The invaders got a good many 
fouls called on them, evidently due 
to the fact that the refereeing is 
less strict, or the game rougher, in 
their home conference. The crowd 
expressed their displeasure freely at 
what seemed a semi-stalling game, 
altho in reality it was merely t h e 
deliberate passing that created the 
impression. 



10 



THE TIGER 



CURRENT ART EXHIBITIONS 
MUSIC 



THEATRE 



CINEMA REVIEWS— BOOKS 
DRAMA 



THE BURNS 



PARAMOUNT 

Home of Paramo.unt 
Pictures * 



STARTS SUNDAY 

Gary Cooper 

"The Virginian" 
in 

"7 Days Leave" 

Bigger and better than 
"T h e Virginian" — 
Gary's first starring pic- 
ture — from the stage 
play by J. M. Barrie. 



THURSDAY 
Charlottee 
Greenwood 

in 

"So Long Letty" 

Whirl through a peppy 
comedy with this music- 
al star. 




Coming 
Saturday 

Norma 
Shearer 

in 

'Their own 
DESIRE' 

ALL 
TALKING 

Flaming 
Youth's 
Bold Defense 
Against 
The Bitter 
Accusations 
Of the Older 
Jazz Genera- 
tion. 

A GREAT 
ENTERTAINMENT 



Junior Farce 
Well Staged, 
Writes Critic 



RIALTO 

BARGAIN HOUR 
1 to 2 P. M. 25c 



By A. M. E. 

Regardless of the fact that 
"What Happened to Jones" is not 
a well written play, it held the in- 
terest of two audiences and kept 
them in gales of laughter. Further- 
more, a well selected cast entered 
into the spirit of the play and took 
their part well. It would seem un- 
necessary to say that the members 
of the cast knew their lines well, 
but after having too often sat with 
great uneasiness through Colorado 
College plays marred by the cast's 
evident unsureness of its lines, one 
felt it a pleasure to enjoy this rol- 
licking comedy. 

William Hinkley as Jones, was a 
convincing and thoroughly likeable 
seller of Bibles — and playing cards. 
Geraldine Williams, with her atro- 
cious fuzzed hair and ill suited 
clothing starred in the part of the 
spinster who treasured five hundred 
and more letters. Mary Strachan 
seemed a very real wife for the ab- 
sent minded professor played by 
Clifford Vessey. Maxine Moore 
as Cissy amused by her coquettish 
nature. De Witt Tucker was a very 
handsome and jealous young lover. 
The supporting cast was effective: 
Matilda Willis as the studious 
daughter; Lorna Dorlac as the en- 
gaged girl; Genevieve Engel, per- 
haps too incongrously dressed, but 
very laughable, as the seemingly 
stupid maid; John Thurston as the 
lunatic; Humphrey Saunders as the 
clergyman with a deep love for a 
woman he has never seen. Of the 
minor parts, those of Clifford Ves- 
sey and John Thurston were most 
effective. Mr. Arthur Sharp is to 
be congratulated on the success of 
the play. 



Betty: "Do you know that the 
Pagan sings again?" 

Nellie: "Sure, everybody knows 
that Ramon Novarro sings four 
brand new song hits in his new pic- 
ture coming to the Rialto. It's 
'Devil May Care," a musical ro- 



Norma Shearer, the beautiful star 
with the beautiful speaking voice, 
said of her new all talking picture, 
"Their Own Desire," coming to the 
Rialto Theatre Saturday, "It is the 
finest blend of action, love, dra- 
ma and heart interest I have ever 
made, and it shows flaming youth's 
side of the eternal triangle." 



Dramatic Classes Will 
Give Program Tuesday 

"So's Your Old Antique" will be 
presented by the dramatic depart- 
ment under the direction of Beatrice 
Barnes at the LitUe Theatre in Be- 
mis on Tuesday evening, January 
28. Jane Kimzey and Ivan Schwen- 
inger will take the leading roles in 
this feature play. The play, writ- 
ten by Clare Kummer, is a sophis 
ticated society comedy full of bril- 
liant repartee and wit. Clara 
Adams, well known dramatic so- 
prano of Colorado Springs, is the 
assisting artist. 

Another one-act play, "Ashes of 
Roses" by Mackay, starring Audrey 
Meikle will be an added attraction 
to the program. The entire pro- 
gram will last only an hour, begin- 
ning at seven-thirty to permit play- 
goers to see the basketball game. 
The admission will be fifty cents, 
and tickets should be bought in ad- 
vance as the Little Theatre has 
only a liminted number of seats. 



Inquiring 

Reporter 



Question — What is your opinion 
of final examinations? 

Margaret Killian — "Different 
students' natures are so different 
that a standard examination seems 
hardly fair." 

Ivan Schweninger — "Finals are 
like ghosts in the night. They are 
just a passing scare." 

Duane Osboume — "Finals are 
necessary in finding out how much 
a student really knows. If periodi- 
cal exams were given which were 
not called 'finals,' they would not 
be taken so seriously." 

Velma Rose — "I think final ex- 
ams are great. If you are flunking 
a course, a good grade in the final 
will pass you. Then too, the ex- 
am will not flunk you if your other 
grades are good." 



f "Better Equipped Thar 
To Handle College Tr 



Ever 
ide." 



CAMPBELL'S 

BARBER SHOP 

109 East Pikes Peak Avenue 



Renowned Writers 
On Our Faculty 

By Effie Gilbert 

Colorado College can boast of 
several writers of note on its fac- 
ulty. Among them are Dr. C. C. 
Mierow, Prof. Archer B. Hulbert, 
Dr. E. C. Wilm, and Miss Amanda 
Ellis. 

The writings of Dr. Mierow covei 
a wide range of subjects, and in- 
clude text books, such as "The Es- 
sentials of Latin Syntax," and "The 
Essentials of Greek Syntax." H e 
has written numerous scholastic ar- 
ticles and two widely acclaimec 
volumes entitled "The Gothic His- 
tory of Jordanes" and "Hugo de 
Sancto Victore." 

Professor Hulbert, who ranks 
among the leading authorities o r 
western history, has written numer- 
ous books and magazine articles or 
historical subjects, the most recent 
of which is "Frontiers — the Geniu; 
Of American Nationality," one o] 
the most widely discussed historica 
works of the winter. Among hi; 
other works are "Red Men'; 
Roads," "Historic Highways oi 
America,'" "Colonel Washington,' 
"The Queen of Quelparte" anc 
"The Making Of the American Re- 
public." 

Miss Amanda Ellis has writter 
short stories and compiled anc 
made notes for a volume of shorl 
stories collected from various auth- 
ors. 



During the final examinations 
tea will be served from four to si> 
in Tichnor study. All members ol 
the student body are invited to at- 
tend. 

AMERICA" 

SUNDAY— 3 DAYS 




COMING WEDNESDAY 
For 3 Days 

Danceifiall 

with Arthur Lake and Olive Bordei 



THE TIGER 



11 



* 



— ♦ 



A SERVICE 
for Every Purse 



THE 
PEARL LAUNDRY 



"It Pays To Look Well* 

Alamo Hotel 

BARBER AND BEAUTY SHOP 

R. W. Counts, Prop. 
Phone Main 1255-W 124 S. Tejon 



BUICK AND MARQUETTE 
MOTOR CARS 

Strang's 



Harry D. MacDonald 
President 



Made in Colorado Springs 

VAN BRIGGLE 
ART POTTERY 

The world's most famous 
art pottery. 

Visitors always welcome. 




30 N. Tejon 



Phone M. 214 



CITY COAL 

15 East Pikes Peak Avemu 

Phone 

Main 67 or 120 



Cambridge Gives Stone 

For Shove Chapel 

The Shove Memorial Chapel to 
be built for Colorado College in 
1930-31 through a gift of $250,000 
by Eugene P. Shove, will have one 
of the original stones of King's 
college Chapel, Cambridge Univer- 
sity, England, built into the struc- 
ture. Word has been received from 
England that the attitude of the 
provost and fellows of King's Col- 
ege was favorable towards grant- 
ng the request of the President and 
the Board of Trustees. The formal 
request document will be prepared 
on a sheet of parchment and for- 
warded to England shortly. 

The first member of the Shove 
family to come to America in 1638 
was educrted in King's College, re- 
ceiving his degree in 1629. The 
building of this original stone from 
King's College chapel into the 
Shove Memorial Chapel will link 
the past with the present. The im- 
pressive ceremony of laying this 
stone will be iheld some time in 
June, 1930. 

The design of the Shove Me- 
morial Chapel was inspired by the 
Norman portion of Winchester Ca- 
thedral, England. Inquiries have 
been forwarded to the authorities of 
Winchester Cathedral concerning 
the donation of a stone from this 
building. John Gray of Pueblo is 
the architect for the Shove Chapel. 

Recently Mr. Shove added a gift 
of $100,000 as E.n endowment fund 
for the building and to obtain the 
services of noted speakers. 



Financial Statement of Tiger for 

September, October, November 

December and January 

Amount received from 

A. S. C. C. - - - $ 450.00 
Amount received from 

Advertising - - - - 768.11 



$1218.11 
Cost of printing Tiger: 

September - - - -$ 146.35 

October 248.35 

November 398.41 

December 115.65 

January 66.45 



Total $ 975.21 

Editor's Salary - - - 75.00 

Manager's Salary - - 75.00 

Mailing bills, alumni let- 
ters, and stamps - 34.00 

Out West Printing Co. 

for books - - - 2.90 



Total $1162.11 

Amount received - - - $1218.11 
Expenses 1162.11 



Couture's 1 1 



French Cleaning and Dyeing Co. 

Phones 1288-1289 
218 N. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 



for hot, clean 

clinkerless fuel 

— call the "coal phone" 

M 577 




COAL/ 



Balai 



ice - - - - 



$ 56.00 



The Ice Cream 
that's a C. C. 
"Institution" 

The between Class "Cones", 
t h e sandwich materials and 
candy, the ice creams and ices 
for class and club functions. 

From Frosh to Grad it's the 
place every Tiger knows. 

MoWRY'S 

Across from Campus 

Main 1183. 1184 



THE 

WHITE WAY 

SYSTEM 

Open Until 2 A. M. 

Try our delicious White 
Way Chili 

11 N. Tejon St. 



n 



OWARD'S 

BARBER 
SHOP 



19 East Bijou Street 



rhe Colorado Planing 
Mill Co. 

MILL WORK OF ALL 
DESCRIPTIONS 

PADDLES 

Frank Mitchell, Manager 

Phone 2876-W 
325 W. Colorado Ave. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE J. S. BROWN 

MERCANTILE 

COMPANY 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



FOR PLUMBING AND HEATING WORK 

''^"^^ BUMSTEAD'S ^^f 

"Where Your Dollars Have More Cents" 



Called For — Delivered — Laundered — 
and Ready to Use 

SHEETS 7 cents 

BATH TOWELS 2 cents 

NAPKINS 1 cent 

The Elite Way 

IS the Most Economical 

PHONE MAIN 82 

LAUNDRY and 
DRY CLEANING 




4 



12 



THE TIGER 




TOOTTOOT US THE CIPKK&S. WIIXYOU 
YIEUI OR BEIiHOlJWII eEiKATH THK 

WHtjyS? KOiKKIMiliLESirY 



"Never!" cried Our Nell, bound to the rails, her eyes 
blazing with defiance. "Death is preferable to a life with 
such as you." 

"How do you make that out?" he purred. 

*'A rasping voice such as yours would make life a living 
hell," she answered him. "Unbind me, change to 
OLD GOLDS and maybe I'll listen to reason." 



© p. Lorillaid Co. 




FASTEST GROWING GGAftETTE IN HISTORY. . . NOT A COUGH IN A CARLOAD 



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Plumbing Heating 



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Custer 



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Phone 
Main 
1674 



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"""""'<""""""!!!}!!' '4 




Obc Colorado CoHc^<? ^^ 




VOLUME XXXII 
Number 17 



OfUciai Students Pablication 

February 7, 1930 



"liiifiiMiMiiiiiiinriiririiiiiiijMiriiriiniiiriiiniiiMiMiiiiiii nil mimmiiiimiiiiiiii 



NIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIItllllNlllinilllllllUIIIIIIIII 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 
I 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUL^ 



College Tradition Falls By Wayside 




ONE FRATERNITY ASSUMES RESPONSIBILITY 
[See Editorial Page] 



lllllll 



llllli 

mill 
mill 
mm 
I 







HJ) 



Office of Publication: 23 Weit Colorado Ave.. Colorado Sprinsi, Colo. 



THE TIGER 



...on the table lifs 



Skill/ 




in a ciga 



rette Irs I A S T E / 



Judge a tree by its fruit." The endless de- 
tail of ageing tobacco, blending and cross-blend- 
ing, the standard Chesterfield method, is not 
what interests you. /^^ 

But its "fruit" — keener, spicier aroma, true 
mildness with unmistakable tobacco "character" 
—is just the one thing that smokers can judge by— 




TASTE above every thiag 




MILD... and yet 
THEY SATISFY 



hesterfield 

FINE TURKISH and DOMESTIC tobaccos, not only BLENDED but CROSS-BLENDED 



•C) 1929, liGGETT & Myers Tobacco Co, 



Welcome back Old Students Special Evening Dinners 35c 

eottEeri) iMM ^-'^""- 



Issued Friday of each week. Entered at the Post Office at Colorado Springs as Second-Class Matter. 



qrHJB TieER 



VOLUME XXXII 



Colorado College Weekly News Magazine 



Number 17 



TIGERS FACE CRUTIAL 
D. U. GAME, SATURDAY 



A Win Will Place Tiger In Tie For 
Second Place, But Former De- 
feat Gives D. U. Edge 



By Hugh Baker 

III what promises to be a crucial 
tilt the C. C. Tigermen take t h e 
floor Saturday night at Denver 
against the strong Denver team. 

Denver has a strong outfit and 
to date have been going great guns 
against all the Eastern conference 
teams. Their scoring aces, Hively, 
speedy forward, and Roy Byers, of 
football fame and who plays run- 
ning guard, are both terrors to the 
minds of all Rocky Mountain coach- 
es. 

In Richie Hotten, Denver has one 
of the strongest back guards in its 
history. He is mentioned as poten- 

(Continued on page 13) 



Lawson Gives Hint On 
Worth Of Husbands (Pin) 



"Pickwick Papers" the magazine 
of Motor Travel for January, 1930, 
contains an interesting article en- 
titled "Is a Husband Worth a Hair 
Pin?" by Jack F. Lawson. The in- 
teresting statement is made, "If you 
want the one and have the other, 
all you have to do is to visit Colo- 
rado's wonderful Cave of the 
Winds." 



Roberts Has Charge Of 
Chapel Twice A Week 

Durnig the second semester of the 
present academic year, the Rev. 
Paul Roberts will be in charge of 
the religious exercises two mornings 
a week, conducting chapel as usual 
on Thursday morning and presid- 
ing over a discussion group on Tues- 
days at the regular chapel hour 
from 10:03 to 10:23. The Tues- 
day meetings will be held in Room 
48, Palmer Hall and will consist of 
informal discussions of religious 
problems. All members of the stu- 
dent body and Faculty are cordially 
invited to be present. 

Dr. James G. McMurtry will con- 
tinue to preside over chapel on 
Mondays. 

Dr. H. Guy Goodsell, Pastor of 
the First Methodist Episcopal 
Church of Colorado Springs, will be 
in charge on Wednesdays and Dean 
Hershey will speak on Fridays. 



'Trosh'' Women 
Commended for 
Conservatism 



That the Freshmen women have 
learned to use make-up conserva- 
tively since they have entered 
Colorado College was disclosed to 
the student body at the monthly 
student assembly Thursday by Ste- 
wart Wilson, president of the Asso- 
ciated Student Body. Wilson, in 
looking back over the first semes- 
ter, the improvements, and what 
the student council has attempted 
to do, commended the freshmen 
women for cutting down on their 
excessive amount of make-up. He 
further stated that he was firmly 
convinced that sororities were need- 
ed on the Colorado College campus. 
In discussing deferred pledging, 
Wilson said that this system would 
bring more permanent students to 
the schools of the Rocky Mountain 
Conference but until the financial 
system was worked out and all the 
schools in the conference combined 
on one program, there would be no 
deferred pledging. The Associated 
Student Council is attempting to 
control managerships of all class 
activities this year, but they are 
only acting in this way to protect 
themselves and the college, and 
they are not trying to take privi- 
leges away from the classes. 

In talking of the Associated Pres- 
idents' meeting in Stanford, Wilson 
said that the conference did most 
good in the individual group meet- 
ings where fraternities, traditions, 
and deferred pledging was dis- 
cussed. A full account of the con- 
ference was published in the Tiger 
on January 10. 



PRESIDENT MIEROW BACK FROM 
SUCCESSFUL EASTERN JOURNEY 



President Mierow returned to Colorado College last Wednesday 
after attending the Association of American Colleges and the Associa- 
tion of Colleges of Congregational Affiliation in Washington, and Colo- 
1 rado College Alumni Association meetings in Wash- 
ington, New York and Boston. 

The Association of American Colleges, which 
has a membership of approximately 600 institutions 
of higher learning, met at the Hotel Willard January 
14 to 16. President Mierow presented a paper, il- 
lustrated by lantern slides, on the subject "College 
Chapel Buildings in America." The members of the 
association were entertained by President Hoover, 
by Bishop Freeman, and by the American Associa- 
tion of University Women. Included among t h e 
speakers at the session were Sir Esme Howard, the retiring British Am- 
bassador, and General Smuts. 

Following the sessions of the Association of American Colleges, Dr. 




Mierow presided as President 



Murray Wins Race 
To Toll Victory 

Colorado College has won three 
athletic combats since the last issue 
of "The Tiger." According to the 
custom inaugurated by this paper 
last semester, there is reprinted be- 
low the names of the frosh who 
were the first to ring the Cutler 
Bell. 

Tiger-Teacher game: Hartley 
Murray, Gene Lague, and Harold 
Weidman. 

Tiger-Aggie game: Harold Weid- 
man, John Bennett, and Hartley 
Murray. 

Tiger-Wyoming game: Hartley 
Murray, Harold Weidman, and Bob 
Stillman. 



Abbott and Mautner Write on Child Labor 



"Child Labor in Agriculture and 
Farm Life in the Arkansas Valley 
of Colorado" by Bertram H. Maut- 
ner and W. Lewis Abbott is the title 
of the December issue of the Colo- 
rado College Publication. The 
study came as a result of a meeting 
held in the spring of 1924 in Colo- 
rado by representatives of Colorado 
College. Colorado Agricultural Col- 
lege. The University of Colorado, 
State Teachers' College, Denver 
University, the National Child Lab- 
or Committee, the State Depart- 
ment of Education, and the Rocky 
Mountain Beet Growers Associa- 
tion. It was resolved at this meet- 



ing to make a survey of child labor 
and education conditions in Colo- 
rado, and this publication of Maut- 
ner's and Abbott's report marks the 
completion of a series of findings 
on Child Labor. 

The field work and much of the 
statistical work, was done by Mr. 
Howard W. Bell and Miss Anne 
Bispham under the authors' super- 
vision. Miss Margaret M. Morris. 
Mr. Raymond P. Gruner. and Mr. 
Shue Fei Chen, students at Colo- 
rado College, also assisted in the 
computation and tabulation of sta- 
tistical material. 



the annual meeting of the Associa- 
tion of Colleges of Congregational 
Affiliation meeting in conjunction 
with the Presidents of the Colleges 
of Christian denomination. The 
speakers included Presidents Cowl- 
ing of Carleton and Harper of El- 
ton, and Dean Weigle of the Yale 
Divinity School. 

The largest groups of alumni of 
Colorado College ever to meet in 
New York, Boston, and Washington 
greeted President Mierow on his 
eastern trip. The meetings were 
very enthusiastic, and all were in 

(Continued on page 13) 



Physics Classes Visit 
Local Alexander Plant 



Mr. Olson's class in Physics I 
were given the opportunity to ob- 
serve the manufacture of airplanes 
at the local Alexander plant on 
Thursday, January 16. Planes in 
all stages of construction made it 
easy to follow the various steps. 
The most interesting feature was 
perhaps the new Bullet plane and 
the third glider model which is now 
under construction. 

On the same day Professor 
Boucher's class in Aeronautics made 
an inspection tour of the .Alexander 
plant. It was of particular interest 
to observe how the theory discussed 
in the course was applied in prac- 
tice. Words such as camber, aile- 
ron, elevator, dilhedral angle mean 
a great deal more after a semester's 
study of the principles of flight. Of 
particular interest were the differ- 
ent types of motors and their points 
j of superiority as pointed out by the 
guide. 



THE TIGER 



PLAZA HOTEL BEAUTY SHOP 
Finger wave — Marcels 

Permanent Waves 

Phone Main 2515 



CHOCOLATES 

Good as Made 

Box Goods a Specialty 

WALLACE CANDY COMPANY 



WAGNER-FULTS STUDIO 

Bums Theatre Bldg. 
Exclusive Photographers for the 

PIKES PEAK NUGGET 



♦ 

it 


FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 

We Dry Clean 


I 


Ladies* i 


(^...^."Phone us first" 


Gents' j 


Dresses ^ 

Furs 

Gloves 


Cojiege^"^^ 


Hats j 
Topcoats { 
Tuxedos j 


Hats 


[ ^B ^ffTj^^^C^^^^^ 


Gloves I 


Scarfs 




Ties 


Etc. 


^^ 


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M. 2958 


Sweaters \ 


♦ 


""""" " •----.-----■ •• 





SUPERIOR 

Dry Cleaning Co. 

Telephone 1364 129 N. Tejon 



Good Plumbing and Heating 

Get an estimate on your next job 

J. C.ST. JOHN 

PLUMBING 6? HEATING COMPANY 

226 N. Tejon St. Vi^AKER M. 48 



B 



AKER 
Automatic OU 
URNER 



PiGGlVkWiGGLY 



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ALL OVER THE WORLD 

FIVE BUSY STORES IN 

COLORADO SPRINGS 



Knorr's Market 

FOR YOUR PARTIES OR PICNICS 



Let us supply you with 
good things to eat 



123 North Tejon 



Phone 2602 



New Books 



The followiriK volumes have recently 
been received at the Coburn Library. This 
list is published in "The Tiger" through 
the courtesy of Miss Louise Kampf. 

History and Biography 

Angell, J. W. — Recovery of Ger- 
many. 1929. 843.085 An4r 

Buell, R. L. — Europe; a history of 
ten years. 1929. 940.5 286e 

Buell, R. L. — The native problem in 
Africa. 1928. 960 B86n 

Cheyney, E. P. — Readings in Eng- 
lish history. 1922. 942 C429r2 

Commission for relief in Belgium. 
Public relations of the Commis- 
sion for relief in Belgium. 1929. 
940.47 C73p 

Conrad, Joseph — Life and letters. 
1927. B C76 

Crane, V. W. — The southern fron- 
tier. 1928. 975C85s 

Crump, C. G. — The legacy of the 
middle ages. 1926. 940.1 C68e 

Dix, M. H. — An American business 
adventure. 1928. B D642d 

Drake, S. A. — New England legends 
and folklore. 18—? 974 D789 

Fosdick, R. B. — The old savage in 
the new civilization. 1929. 901 
F78c 

Gottschalk, L. R. — The era of the 
French revolution. 1929.944.04 
C71e 

Harper, S. N. — Civic training in 
soviet Russia. 1929. 947 H23e 

Horn, A. A. — Harold the webbed. 
1929. B H78h2 

Horn, A. A.— Trader Horn. 1927. 

B H78h 

Hulme, E. M.— Middle ages. 1929. 
940.1 H87m 

Instituut Kern — Annual bibliogra- 

....phy of Indian archaeology. 1926. 
A9 13.54 In7a 

Lippmann, Walter — Men of destiny. 
1927. Be L66m 

Luchaire, Achiile — Social France at 
the time of Philip Augustus. 
1929. 914.4 L96s 

MacDonald, A. J. S. — Lanfranc; a 
study of his life, work, and writ- 
ings. 1926. B L24m 

Magoffin, R. V. D.— Magic spades; 
the romance of archaeology. 
1929. 913. M27m 

Pennell, R. F. — Ancient Greece 
from the earliest times down to 
146 B. C. 1889. 938 P38a 

Phillips, U. B. — Life and labor in 
the old south, 1929. 975 P54e 

Putnam, Samuel — Francois Rabel- 
ais; man of the renaissance, 
1929. BRIlp 

Renouvin, Pierre — The immediate 
origins of the war. 1928 940.31 1 
R29i 

Rippy, J. F. — Rivalry of the United 
States and Great Britain ovet 
Latin America. 1929. 973.5 
R48r 

Salmon, L. M. — Why is history re- 
written. 1929. 901 Sa3w 

Thompson, J. W. — Feudal Ger- 
many. 1928. 943.02 T37f 



You will Look and Feel Better 
after seeing us. 

Elk Barber Shop 

122 East Pikes Peak 



EAT 'EM UP TIGERS 

Then come down and eat 
that tasty 
Confection 

AUS FRENCH 
FRIED POPCORN 

114 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 



PAUDRE-PAUFFE 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Permanent Finger and Water 

Waving 

Manicure and Scalp Treatments 

Marcels 50c. 



The Trip that Bankrupts the 
English Language 

CORLEY 

Mt. Highway 

Cripple Creek in high gear 



LOOK YOURBEST 

Have your hair cut in the 
approved manner. 

Pete's Barber Shop 

8 E. Cucharras St. 



HOLLY SUGAR 

is 
the Best 

Sugar the essential food, 

HOLLY SUGAR 
CORPORATION 



PLAZA 

DINING 
ROOM 

"The Place to Eat" 

Breakfast Luncheon 

Dinner 



THE TIGER 



Velvet Blend Coffee 

Freshly Roasted, Freshly Ground 
45c lb. 

Yes, it's wonderful coffee 

Delivered to your kitchen. 

THE COFFEE SHOP 

124 N. Tejon 



Mrs. Stovers Bungalow 
Candies will make an ex- 
cellent Valentine Gift. 




W. I. Lucas 

HAS 

EVERYTHING IN 

SPORTING GOODS 
"Tigers always welcome" 

119 N. Tejon St. 
Main 900 



Hey-Service 

The 
HEYSE SHEET 
METAL WORKS 

INC. 

219 N.Weber 
Main 552 



Shoe Rebuilding 

Shines 

Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

BUSY CORNER SHOE SHOP 

104 E. Pikes Peak Phone M. 689- W 



When you consider that you 
can purchase any make t3rpe- 
writer on monthly paymenb 
as small as $5.00 it is not a 
question of affording it 

The essential question is if 
you can afford to be without 



T-^ 



The 
Typewriter 



125 N. Tejon Main 95 




Alaska Bishop Speaks 
In Assmbly On Monday 



The speaker at the Assembly on 
Monday morning will be the Right 
Reverend Peter Trimble Rowe, D. 
D., Bishop of the Episcopal Church 
in Alaska. Bishop Rowe's life for 
the past thirty-five years has been 
one of the greatest romance and 
fascination. Over this area of six 
hundred thousand square miles, 
partly in the Arctic circle, Bishop 
Rowe has travelled winter and sum- 
mer. He went in with the first 
rush of gold seekers, and stayed in 
to build schools, churches and hos- 
pitals; to minister to the men in the 
camps, to Eskimoux in the for north 
to Indians in the interior and on the 
coast, and as the country grew, 
to the dwellers in the little towns 
which sprang up over night. 

A dominant figure in the early 
days. Bishop Rowe is still one of the 
best known and best loved men in 
Alaska. Up and down the Yukon 
River he has gone in the summer in 
his little launch, and in the winter 
on snow shoes with a dog sled. He 
is one of the missionary heroes of 
the twentieth century, with adven- 
ture and romance that comes to few 
men in this world. 

In addition to the College Assem- 
bly, Bishop Rowe will preach at 
Grace Church Sunday morning at 
eleven o'clock. 



In the republic of Andora the 
women cannot eat at the same table 
with their husbands. 

"It is better for a boy to be born 
poor than to be born rich." — Jo- 
sephus Daniels. 

"Give the boss more than he has 
a right to expect and if he is any 
kind of a boss he will see that you 
are properly rewarded. And if he 
doesn't no man can succeed under 
him — and you had better find an- 
other job." — Walter P. Chrysler. 

"When you get a decent profit, 
take it."— Robert Dollar. 

"Playing bridge is the lowest 
depths to which the human can 
fall." — Prof. Robert Emmons. 

"I never quite know how much 
money I ought to send my boys at 
college." 

"Well, I always keep my boy very 
short of money now. I find he 
writes home more often and much 
more charming letters." — London 
Opinion. 

Read It and Weep 

Boston is a place where they ask 
the druggist for monaceticacidester 
of salicylicacid for headache in- 
stead of aspirin. 



Dean of Men at University of 

Illinois Criticizes Hell Week 



By Thomas Arkle Clark, Dean of 
Men, University of Illinois 
At an institution with which I 
have some acquaintance the last in- 
itiation season saw one man with 
blood poisoning resulting from 
careless branding on the chest; a 
second in the hospital with a ner- 
vous breakdown after going through 
a mock trial following an alleged 
"oath violation;" a third shot in 
the leg by a careless farmer who 
thought his meathouse in danger 
from midnight marauders, and sun- 
dry others jailed, fined, or official- 
ly warned for loitering about pri- 
vate premises and disturbing the 
peace. All this besides the hours 
that are wasted, the grades that are 
lowered, the erroneous ideas that 
are inculcated concerning fraternity 
ideas in the minds of the men who 
are being initiated. The pros and 
cons of Hell Week have been more 
generally discussed among fratern- 
ity leaders than during the last two 
or three years. The delegates to 
the last Interfraternity Conference 
in New York after listening to a 



Mieroiv Receives 
Group Petitions 

President Mierow announced that 
he had received petitions from the 
Associated Student Council and the 
Red Lantern Club asking for stu- 
dent assemblies twice a week .Presi- 
dent, believing that this is too great 
a change from the present one as- 
sembly a month rule, has decided 
to have assemblies once a week, 
and to call other assemblies when 
such a meeting is necessary. 

LATE WIRE FLASH 



Phi Gamma Delta, with Britton 
as high score man, defeated Delta 
Alpha Phi, in the inlrafraternity 
basketball opener, 19-3. at Cossitt 
gymnasium last evening. 

In the other game the Indepen- 
dents, dressed in new uniforms and 
led by Hess, were victorious over 
Pi Kappa Alpha, 21-3. 

Then there is the Scotchman who 
bought a wedding ring at auction 
and made his fiance diet until it 
fitted. 

Moral 

A $2,000 bank roll was found in 
the street by a New York girl who 
promptly returned it to the owner 
and got a husband. Which proves 
to the girls that they can't be too 
careful what they pick up on the 
streets. 



clever discussion of the matter 
voted unanimously against the prac- 
tices of Hell Week as they are now 
carried on in most of our colleges. 
And yet following this discussion 
and this expression of opinion by 
the grand officers and older men 
of the Greek-letter world the repre- 
sentatives of the active chapters 
who were present and listened to 
the arguments advanced went back 
to their deliberations and voiced 
sentiments almost diametrically op- 
posed to those expressed by their 
elders, if not their betters. They 
seemed to feel, these representa- 
tives of the organized wisdom of 
the present college generation, that 
in giving up Hell Week, they were 
giving up something precious, 
something vital to the life of the 
fraternity. 

"It is absolutely necessary," one 
man explained to me (his chapter 
features the oath violation, I am 
sure) "that our initiates be reduced 
to a state of mental and physical 
exhaustion before they are pre- 
pared properly to appreciate our 
formal ritual. We would lose a 
great deal if we were not allowed 
to send our men out upon an ex- 
hausting quest." 

I asked him if he thought the 
seriousness of the marriage cere- 
mony or of admission to church 
membership would be increased or 
emphasized if candidates were beat- 
en black and blue by relatives or 
members of the organization, or 
subjected to other physical cruelties 
I previous to the formal ceremony. 
He was not so sure. 

"The freshmen expect some- 
thing," I have been told many times, 
"and it would disappoint them if 
the traditional rough-house practic- 
es were eliminated. They have 
heard (in an extravagantly e.\- 
aggerated form) the stories of what 
the active men have suffered be- 
fore they were allowed to wear the 
pin, and they are eager for the 
same experience. We went thru 
the experience and are sure that it 
did us no harm; why shouldn't he?" 
Besides, we cannot give our fellows 
less than our neighbors do." 

There is something in this no 
doubt, but I learned years ago that 
the most effective thing I can do in 
my associations with people is to 
give them whnl they are not expect- 
ing. One is always prepared for 
what he expects, and being pre- 
pared the effect is materially min- 
imized. It would be much better 
to surprise the initiate by giving 
him something he was not looking 
for. 



THE TIGER 



Member of Rocky Mountain 

Inter-Collegiate Press 

Association 




The Colorado College 

Newspaper, 

Published Weekly by the 

Students. 



THE TIGER 

Articled intended for publication should be left in the Tiger Box, on the first 
floor of Cobum library, by Wednesday noon. No unsigned contributions will be 
published. 



LLOYD H. ELLIS Main 1975 Editor 

James Keyser Associate Editor Barratt O'Hara Desk Editor 



PAT PATTERSON 



.Main 2575 Manager 



ARE FRATERNITIES FORGETTING TRADITIONS? 

Four weeks ago it was announced in the Tiger that the names of 
the first Freshman to ring the Cutler Bell following a Colorrdo College 
athletic victory would be printed in the Tiger. To stimulate interest the 
names of those who had rung the bell first [and exclusively] that week 
were placed in that issue of the paper. The next week, the Tigers 
failed to win their game, but the next issue of the Tiger found the names 
of the same freshmen who had been printed in the earlier edition of 
the Tiger. 

Since the last Tiger has been printed, Colorado College has won 
three basketball games; the Cutler Bell has been rung three times; and 
by whom? Those same freshmen from the same fraternity have rung 
the bell for the last five times. They were not the first freshmen to ring 
the bell; they were the only freshmen to climb Cutler stairs and toll in 
the darkness, working in shifts of thirty minutes for three hours while 
freshmen of other fraternities nestled close to their home fires, or took 
dates to baskellball games and broke one college tradition while they 
ignored another. 

Those freshmen who have rung the bell should be commended for 
their spirit. The fraternity to which they are pledged should be con- 
gratulated on getting their freshmen interested in such a tradition, but 
the action of the other freshmen and the inactivity of the other frater- 
nities in regard to ringing Cutler Bell is to be deplored. 

Since 1874 it has been a college tradition for the freshmen of Colo- 
rado College to ring the Cutler Bell; in 1930, it is a fraternity custom 
for its pledges to ring the Cutler Bell. Are we losing our "all College" 
spirit?" 

FRATERNITIES AND EDUCATION. 

What contribution has the American college fraternity made to the 
cause of education? That question was asked at a conference of uni- 
versity presidents a year or so ago and a committee was formed to en- 
deavor to develop the answer. 

When the credit side of the ledger is set up, there are some very 
tangible entries to make. These entries will include the distinct con- 
tribution made by the Phi Delta Theta chapter at Amherst College, 
which financed an expedition which went out and brought back for the 
geological museum of the college a splendid collection of specimens 
which had been lacking. 

A place is modestly claimed likewise for the valuable manual on 
"How To Study" which was published by Phi Gamma Delta last year. 
Their tutorial projects at Oklahoma and Minnesota belong, too, in the 
listing of assets. 

Now comes Chi Phi at the University of Wisconsin with w,hat is 
perhaps the first experiment of its kind in American eductaion. The 
Kiffies at Madison have entered into an arrangement with the university 
whereby an instructor is now conducting informal classes in current 
economic problems in the chapter house. The students — Chi Phis and 
their pledges — will receive three university credits upon the completion 
of a satisfactory semester's work in the course, their examination papers 
being graded by a member of the faculty other than the instructor. 

The Wisconsin plan is available to all fraternities and sororities 
which have maintained a scholarship average above that of all th^ 
Greeks combined. The regulations provide that the teacher must be J 
regular member of the faculty, that the class must meet at regular hours 
and that the instructor must reside with the group. 

The college fraternity today is making a greater contribution to 
education than the number of beds il provides in its house for students. 

-C.J.W. 



Behind the Scenes With Shakespeare Cast 

By Margaret Bissonnette 

There is a pleasant informality about the back-stage scene of a 
theater, as we found when we visited the Stratford Players, while they 
were in Denver. 

Idle curiosity, maybe, but why are stage door entrances very old 
and musty, and decorated with pictures of the original Floridora sex- 
tette? Perhaps there is no other place where one can find people who 
are so unemotional when it comes to the stage, as among the members of 
the order of Stakedoorkeepers. 

On the stage, there is the usual surprised feeling that the layman 
has when he sees the machinery that carries little Eva to heaven, in the 
Tom shows. Great paint-daubed sets .... prompt books. . . . the 
witches' caldron for "Macbeth" .... Veronese pikes ... old English 
cudgels stacked about in confusion. Pages, in costumes of vivid pur- 
ples, the city watch in scarlet and half-armor being rehearsed . . . those 
mediaeval hoods are fascinating. 

There is a scene-shifter who remarks casually — "I'm glad they 
don't give 'Richard III' — I'm tired of carrying out buckets of gore." . . . 
Actors coming into their dressing rooms . . alone or in groups . . Mr. 
Hayes pleasant "hello" . . . lights flashing on and off . . blues and am- 
bers ... Mr. Walter, tall, rather military in bearing, with a most charm- 
ing manner. Talk ranges from famines to the altitude . . which the 
English actors find quite trying when it comes to delivering long speech- 
es, and dying gracefully . . with all the true actors' faith in the stage 
and Its future, Mr. Walter believes that the "talkies" will have no perm- 
anent effect on the legitimate theater .... "people will always like to 
see real flesh and blood actors you know." Talk of Stratford and the 
English countryside . . . then time to get back to the front, to see the 
fat knight. Sir John come on the scene, with ihis ra 
the old illusion once more. 



Voice, of The Studbmti 



In accordance with the new con- 
stitution recently passed by the stu- 
dent body one additional represen- 
tative to the Associated Student 
Council will be a woman from the 
sophomore class. The election will 
be held next Friday at Palmer Hall. 

Nominations are: Elizabeth Ken- 
nedy, Mary Gallagher, Alice Gil- 
lette, and Josephine Campbell. 

The petitions: 

We, the undersigned do nominate 
Elizabeth Kennedy for candidate 
for Sophomore woman on A. S. C 
C. Evelyn Stubblefield, Eleanor 
Watts, Virginia Graham, Frances P. 
Villano, Anabel Ohistedt, Beth 
Smith, June Rosen, Elinor McClea- 
ry, Alice Gillett, M. McCleary, Jes- 
sie Fuson. 



craft, Harry Matheson, Sonia Ben- 
deroff, Mary McConnell, Dorothy 
Fans. 

We, the undersigned, petition for 
Alice Gillette as Sophomore repre- 
sentative on the A. S. C. C. — 
Clydette Higginbottom, Mary Sev- 
ier, Geneva Wildin, Frances Glau, 
George Robinson, Ruth Griffin, 
Williams, Helen Knowles, Frances 
Bradley, Margery Barkley. 



THORNS FOR DELINQUENTS 



We, the undersigned, wish to 
nominate Josephine Campbell to 
run for office of Sophomore Wom- 
an on the Associated Students 
Council — Betty Crannell, Alice 
Aaby, Virginia Dewey, Glenn F. 
Wade, Sarah Sheldon, Dorothy 
Fans, Letitia Finn, Geraldine Wil- 
liams, Humphrey Saunders, Jo N. 
Hildrioh. 



We, the undersigned, hereby pe- 
tition that Mary Gallagher be can- 
didate for sophomore woman of A. 
S. C. C. — Grace Perkins, Sarah 
Sheldon, Beth Smith, Betty Lans- 
down. Matilda Willis. Jane White- 



At the State University of Mon- 
tana the members of fraternities 
are paying as they go, or they are 
not going very far! Effective this 
fall, any fraternity member owing 
$10 or more on the fifteenth of any 
month for the previous month and 
failing to make satisfactory ar- 
rangements for the payment of his 
bill is ordered excluded from his 
classes by order of the president of 
the university. 

I ast spring diplomas were with- 
held from fraternity members who 
had not paid their chapter bills. 

The way of the lad who doesn't 
pay as he goes daily grows more 
difficult — praise be to Allah! 



Under Table Etiquette 

"Bridge shin" is said to be a 
newly discovered disease. It is con- 
tracted by a husband sitting across 
from his wife and forgetting what 
trumps are. 



THE TIGER 



CURRENT ART EXHIBITIONS 
MUSIC 



THEATRE 



CINEMA REVIEWS— BOOKS 
DRAMA 



TALKIE RECEIVES PRAISE 



The human side of actors — their 
hopes and friendships, ambitions 
and foibles are sympathetically pre- 
sented in "Nix On Dames," an all 
ta-lking Fox Movietone production 
of actors "off-stage," which will be 
the feature film at the America 
Theatre nevt week. 

With a producing staff thorough- 
ly conversant with its subject and a 
notable cast of players carefully 
chosen for their ability to portray 
their own lives on the speaking 
screen, "Nix On Dames" is at once 
a realistic and authentic picture and 
ar-d excellent piece of comedy. 

Mae Clarke, the heroine of Fox 
Movietone's recent "Big Time:" 
Robert Ames, William Harrigan, 
Maude Fulton, George Macfarlane, 
Camille Rovelle and the noted vau- 
deville team of Wallace and Mc- 
Cormack enact the leading roles in 
this production, which was directed 
by Donald Gallaher from Maude 
Fulton's original story. 



You may save with this Associa 
tion, any amount from one dollat 
up per week or month. 

We invite college students to cat 
at our office (Ground floor loca 
tion) 1 16 North Tejon Street, Colo- 
rado Springs. 

E. C. SHARER. President 
I 16 North Tejon Street 



CADILLAC 

and 

CHRYSLER 

MOTORCARS 

Adams Motor Co. 

I Marksheffel Building 



III AMERICA III 

Saturday for 4 days 

ZANK GRAY'S 

first all talking 

"THE LONE STAR 
RANGER" 

A classic of the rugged West 



Nugget Receives Wrong 
Pictures From Students 



In spite of numerous announce- 
ments in the Tiger concerning Nug- 
get pictures, a number of students 
have turned in pictures for the 
1931 Nugget that were not made 
at the Wagner-Fults studio. No 
such pictures can be used in the an- 
nual as they do not have the same 
lighting eflects or background. To 
use such pictures would mar the 
uniformity of the book. 

All fraternities, societies and or- 
ganizations other than the Tiger, 
the Growlers, the Exclamation, the 
Questions, and the "C" clubs, will 
use individual pictures for their 
section. 

All dividers and art work in the 
year book this year will be linole- 
um blocks. According to reports, 
the 1931 Nugget will be the first 
annual to use this type of art work. 



Oratorical Contest Sees 

Only Few Changes 

The Tiger has been authorized to 
make the first announcement on the 
Colorado College campus of the 
many changes in the regulations of 
the 1930 National Intercollegiate 
Oratorical Contest on the Constitu- 
tion which have been announced 
by the director of this year's con- 
test. 

The ten minute limit has been 
abandoned and a word limit of 
1500 words has been set. The to- 
tal amount of the prizes remains 
$5000, the lowest prize being 
raised, however, to $400, but the 
first prize remains at $1500. 

This contest was inaugurated and 
is conducted by the Better America 
Federation of California. Last year 
542 colleges and universities en- 
tered the contest. Every college 
student in America is eligible to 
compete. The finals will be held 
June 19 at Los Angeles. The entries 
close March 25 and each college or 
university should have selected its 
orr.lor by April 15. Information 
concerning the details of the con- 
test may be obtained from P. Cas- 
par Harvey, Contest Director, Lib- 
erty, Mo. 

Those statisticians who claim 
that the automobile industry has not 
rerched the saturation point should 
ride in a rumble seat during a rain. 

The meanest guy in the world is 
the one who every week mails a 
picture of the Statue of Liberty to 
a convict pal who still has 20 years 
to go. 



Schweninger and 
Kimzey in Leads 

A program of drama and music 
was presented by the Dramatic De- 
partment of Colorado College in the 
Little Theatre, Tuesday, January 
twenty-eighth. A pleasant variety 
of songs and plays entertained a 
capacity crowd. Mrs. Beatrice Fitz- 
water Barnes directed, maintaining 
her standard of entertainment which 
always assures a large attendance. 

The program: 
"Ashes of Rosess" - - Mackay 
Kitty Clive (Famous Actress) 

— Audrey Meikle 
Horace Walpole — Mariefrances 

Vollmer 
Phyllis — Elizabeth Sweetman 
Roxane — Miriam Lockhart 
Scene: The theater dressing 
room of Kitty Clive 
' mio Fernando" (La Favorita) 

Donizetti 

Clara Adams 
"His First Defeat" - - Adapted 

Jane Kimzey 
"The Star" ----- Rogers 
"My Lover Is a Fisherman" - 

-- Strickland 

Minor and Major - - - Spross 

Clara Adams 
"So's Your Old Antique!" - - 

Clare Kummer 

Dick Barlow— Ivan Schwenin- 
ger 
Sally, his wife (Hates Antiques) 

—Jane Kimzey 
Mrs. Pettis — F'-zabeth Sweet- 
man 
Mr. Malster (Loves Antiques — 

James Huskie 
William (Mr. Malster's chaf- 
feur)— Gale Middlestetter 
Scene: Dick Barlow's Antique Shop 

Old Gold To Broadcast 
A Hour Of Song Hits 

Broadway's two biggest current 
musical smashes, "Strike Up the 
Band" and "Sons 0' Guns," furnish 
the high lights of the Old-Gold — 
Paul Whiteman House program 
over the Columbia Broadcasting 
System next Tuesday evening 
(Feb. II) from 9 to I Eastern 
Standard time. The song .hit, 
"Soon" from "Strike Up the Band," 
written by the Prince of Jazz com- 
posers, George Gershwin, and ar- 
ranged for the occasion by the King 
jf Jazz conductors, Paul Whitemi.n, 
will be sung by Mildred Bailey, end 
the dashing "Ride On, Vaquero." 
from the same peppery shew will 
be chanted by Bing Crosby. 

"Life's greatest handicap is be- 
ing contented." — Anne Nichols. 



CONOVER AND BAYLISS 
WILL HEAD CARNIVAL 

Paul Conover and Art Bayliss 
have been chosen to act as man- 
agers for the third annual Varsity 
Jubilee, the all college "all" the- 
atre, dinner, dancing party of the 
social schedule. Plans are rapidly 
gaining form, and complete details 
of the program will be in the next 
issue of the Tiger. The date is 
February 21, just two weeks away. 




/Out-of-Town RatesS 



Make up a party of 4 or 5 — 
drive home over the week end. 
Or go to that game, dance or 
picnic. Cheaper than railroad 
or bus fare and the pleasure 
of a car besides. 



D.C.Hutchin^s 

Manager 

21 No. Cascade Ave. 
Phone Main 1800 




8 



THE TIGER 



Broken Lenses Duplicated 

Save the Pieces 

Eyes examined Lenses Ground 




THE LAUTERMAN-DUGAN 

JEWELRY AND OPTICAL CO. 

Jewelers, Optometrists and 

Mfg. Opticians 

Fine Watch, Clock and Jewelry 

Repairing 
121 N. Tejon St. Phone Main 674 



FRANK SARLAS & CO. 

Shoe Shining and Repairing 

Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Quick Service 

132 E. Pikes Peak 



%OMtUk 




TENT €^ AWNING CO 



Awnings and Camp Supplies 



BUSY CORNER 
SHOE SHOP 

Shines — Shoe Repairs 
And Hats Blocked 




ACCESSORIES TIRES 
BICYCLES- CAS & OIL 



GARAGE TIRE SERVICE 

CORDUROY CORDS 

Sidewall Protection 



E. L. Bruce 

BARBER SHOP 

28 E. Kiowa 



Photographs of our Colorado 
mountains. Nicely made — 
attractively colored by hand. 
Moderate in price — framed 
or unframed. 

H. L. STANDLEY 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 No. Tejoii St. 
Colorado Springs 



European Scholarships 
Open To Applicants 

The Institute of International 
Education administers this year ten 
(10) scholarships of $1000 each, 
offered by the New York Commit- 
tee on Foreign Study and Travel. 
These scholarships are open to 
both men and women and are avail- 
able for study during the Junior 
year in any country in Europe. 

A candidate for one of these 
scholarships must be not less than 
eighteen years of age; must have 
been in residence for two academic 
years at an American institution ap- 
proved by the Institute of Inter- 
national Education; and must in- 
tend to return to his American col- 
lege to take his degree. 

During his college career he must 
have given evidence of sound 
health; high mentality, as exhibited 
by mental tests and scholastic rec- 
ords; seriousness of purpose, as 
shown by a somewhat definite plan 
for his career; intellectual interest 
and attainments, as proved by the 
use of leisure; intellectual promise, 
and high moral character. 

Students who do not wish to be 
attached to an organized group will 
plan their courses in conference 
with their college Deans and the In- 
stitute of International Education. 
This tentative program maj be 
modified as circumstances require 
by the representatives of the Insti- 
tute of International Education in 
cooperation with administrative of- 
ficers of the institution in which the 
student plans to study. 

Students desiring to join some or- 
ganized group, such as those of the 
University of Delaware and of 
Smith College for study in France, 
will pursue their work there under 
the direction of those organizations. 

Persons interested in these oppor- 
tunities may secure the necessary 
application blanks from the Insti- 
tute of International Education. Ap- 
plications must be filled out with all 
necessary credentials and filed with 
the Institute on or before April 10. 
Johri Kenneth Emmerson, '29, re- 
ceived one of these scholarships for 
his junior college work, and took 
up his foreign study at the Univer- 
sity of Paris. Emmerson now holds 
a fellowship in Political Science at 
New York University. He is an 
alumnus of Delta Alpha Phi. 



Fort Wayne News-Sentinel — The 
total value of a human body is es- 
timated at not more than $16 on 
the basis of its chemical materials. 
••••••••• 

Reason Enough 

Uncle Jerry said all the women 
were wild over him. He was jan- 
itor of an asylum and slept in the 
basement. 



Sound Off 

Then there was the fellow who 
couldn't enjoy the talkie because 
the man in front of him coughed so 
loud he couldn't hear the lady in 
back of him repeat the lines. 



Miss Gadsby — So you have beei 
engaged for five years! Hasn't i 
been rather boring? 

Miss Ficklesby — No, it has not al 
ways been the same man. 



We are ready to supply you 

with your needed school 

equipment for this 

SEMESTER 



TheMURRAY 
Drug Co. 

Across from the Camvus 



I |.«..«i.«..»..« M «.l»..«..»..«.. 



[ggjiTsiniLLi/Neio^ 



noivmmBOH^Si 



71/2 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 



Knitted 

Dresses 

Smbracing the 
princess idea 



Clever Three - Piece Suits 

with tuck-in blouse of silk, skirts 
having yoke hip line and flared by 
yores and godets. 



AU Interestingly Priced 



QUALITY 



SERVICE 



MENS SUITS CLEANED AND PRESSED $1.00 




PHONE 
356. 



_aurtdvy 

o".'^ Drs; cleaning 

19 E. CUCHARRAS St. 



Phone 
356 






THE TIGER 



COVERS 
ALL THE FIELD 



SPORTS 



BASKETBALL 
CROSS COUNTRY EQUITATION 



IRISH SUBMITS REPORT^ 
OF ATHLETIC FINANCES 



The financial report of the period 
from July I, 1929 to December 31, 

1929 has been completed by Jo 
Irish, Graduate Manager of Ath- 
letics, Colorado College. This re- 
port shows a grand balance of 
nearly $18,000 above all disburse- 
ments for the period. The total re- 
ceipts exceeded $41,000 and the 
disbursements were over $23,000, 
leaving a balance of nearly $18,000 
from the general fund of basketball 
and football, and the stadium fund. 
From this balance $25 interest and 
$7,000 on the principal has been 
paid on the athletic debt. This 
debt was begun and accumulated 
since the time of the World War. 
At the end of the school year 1926- 
27 it amounted to $16,000. Since 
then the debt has been decreased 
until the present payment brings it 
down to $1,900. 

The budget which ihas been made 
out for the period from January 1 , 

1930 to June 30, 1930 will give a 
balance of approximately $4,000. 
It was decided, however, not to fin- 
ish paying off the athletic debt 
from this balance. Since the debt 
has been so greatly reduced, the in- 
terest on it will be comparatively 
small, and it was considered most 
advisable to keep a fair balance on 
hand for the period to follow. 



BOX SCORE 



TIGERS FG. FT. P.F. 

Ingraham, f 1 

Waters, f 5 4 

Slocum, f 7 4 

Doyle, f I 2 I 

Clark, c 2 1 

Hinkley. g 3 2 I 

Reid, g 2 3 2 

20 II 10 

AGGIES FG. FT. P.F. 

Barrows, f 7 I 3 

Day, f 

Wilmore. f 1 I I 

Wilson, f I 

Hitchcock, c 3 I I 

Wrlker, c 

Ball, g 4 I 2 

Stephens, g I 2 

Sandstead, g 1 2 

16 5 12 
Referees: Vidal and Moles. 



Bengals Swamp 

Aggies, 51-37 

The Bengals started up the scor- 
ing ladder last Friday night when 
they defeated the Colorado Aggies, 
51-37, in a rough and tumble game. 
Clark led the offense and defense, 
and fed Waters for basket upon 
basket. The rest of the team divid- 
ed scoring honors evenly between 
them. 

The game started slowly, with 
both teams feeling each other out, 
but before the first quarter was 
gone it had developed into a fast 
and rough contest. The Farmers 
started the scoring for the evening, 
and at the end of the first iheat they 
had a 12-6 lead. 

Waters was sent into the game at 
this point, and seemed to provide 
the needed fire for the team, for 
soon after that he started hitting 
the hoop, and put the Tigers in the 
lead. 18-15, at the half. 

In the third period, the whole 
Tiger team broke loose, and started 
their big drive to victory. Every 
member of the team clicked for the 
whole quarter, and the Bengalmeii 
went into a 47-25 lead as the period 
closed. 

The Aggies, in the last five min- 
utes of play, showed their best 
form, and Colorado College fans 
began to wish the final gun would 
end the game. Barrows and Ball 
both cut loose for five minutes, and 
boosted the Farmers' score up to 
37 points, but their rally came too 
late, and the Tigers sank their last 
counter to close the game, 
liant scoring in the game, while 
liant scoring ine th game, while 
Hinkley vied with Clark for scoring 
honors. Clark took less than a half 
dozen shots at the hoop, but he and 
Hinkley kept the ball in circulation 
until an opening came for one of 
the forwards. 

The game put C. C. into the 
500% class, and practically elim- 
inated the Aggies from conference 
honors. 



Perhaps for the first ime in the 
history of the Tiger, the sport page 
contains this week articles telling of 
three Colorado College victories 
over conference opponents. A full 
schedule of three games last week 
with Aggies. Wyoming, and Teach- 
ers gave C. C. an opportunity lo 
win three straight victories. 

Pity the Scotchman who finally 
gave in and bought a radio becau.'^e 
it got too cold to stand outside the 
radio stores and listen. 



TIGERS UPSET DOPE BUCKET 

TO DEFEAT WYOMING, 31-25 



Featuring a long battle against 
the high touted Wyoming Cowboys, 
the Tigers went into a tie for third 
place last Saturday when they de- 
feated the invaders. 31-25. The 
game saw the return to form of 
'Inky' Ingraham. blonde forward, 
whose brilliant passing and general 
floor game was conspicuous by its 
absence on the preceding night. He 
and Clark led the attack from a 1 1 
quarters, and divided scoring hon- 
ors between themselves. 

Both fives featured a tight de- 
fense, breaking for the basket 
quickly, and returning to the de- 
fense after losing the ball. The 
Tigers passed well, but so did the 
visitors, and only the Tiger stubborn 
wall which they erected around the 



TEACHERS GAME 



Coach Herigstad played a recon- 
structed basketball five against the 
invading Bears from Greeley, and 
drew vengeance for his defeat in 
the city of potatoes. The Teachers 
fought with flagging courage as the 
Tiger lead increased to 38 to 1 7, 
with the Bengals playing a confi- 
dent, scoring game. 

Hinkley was back at guard, and 
with this bare exception the team 
was composed of six-footers. Slo- 
cum was the evening's scoring sen- 
sation. Guy Martin saw his first 
ten minutes of varsity play, and 
worked well with Clark and the 
other regulars. 



South Bend, Ind. — The Albert 
Russel Erskine Trophy, emblematic 
of the national football champion- 
ship as determined by 250 sports 
writers, was presented to Notre 
Dame, 1919 winner, at the Pitts- 
burgh-Notre Dame basketball game 
in this city, February 8th. 

The Erskine Trophy, a silver cup 
beautifully engraved and standing 
approximately two feet in height, 
will remain in the possession of 
Notre Dame until early in 1931 
when it will pass to the team select- 
ed as 1930 champion. In the event 
one school wins the title three con- 
secutive years, the cup will become 
its permanent property. 

In addition to the trophy, a Stu- 
debaker President Eight is awarded 
the coach of the team. Presenta- 
tion of the car for 1929 champion- 
ship honors was made lo Rockne in 
Miami on January 1 8th. 



basket won the game for them. 

Hinkley, Ingraham. and Reid 
rushed every s,hot that the Cow- 
boys took, and the result was very 
few of the invaders* long cracks 
ever getting thru the nets. 

The Tigers jumped into the lead 
soon after the opening gun. and 
Wyoming looked poor for a few 
minutes. The came back however, 
and for the remainder of the peri- 
od, the lead swung from one team 
to the other. 

Wyoming came back on the floor 
in the second half, .holding t h e 
small end of a 16-12 score, and 
fans expected a rally that might 
prove fatal to the Tigers. The 
play kept up the brilliant form that 
it had the first half, however, and 
the Bengals pulled even farther 
away — gaining ten points on their 
opponents. 

Wyoming, staying close to their 
man-to-man defense, started a late 
rally that kept the overflow crowd 
on its feet for a good part of the 
last period. The Cowboys came 
within four points of overtaking the 
local crew, but a stalling game by 
the Tigers — with an occasional 
crack at the hoop, kept the ball 
away from their opponents for the 
remainder of the game, and stopped 
the Wyoming rally. 

The fact that the Tigers battled 
the favorite team of the Eastern 
slope, and defeated them, is a cred- 
it to the Coaching staff of the col- 
lege. The Tigers have come from 
near the cellar position in the con- 
ference, and have still a good 
chance to grab a place in the sun 
before the loop season is over. 
Box Score: 

TIGERS (31) E.G. F.T. P.F. 

Ingraham. f 5 3 

Slocum, f 3 1 

Waters, f 1 

Clark, c 4 3 

Hinkley, g 2 

Reid, g I I 

13 3 6 

WYOMING (25) 

McNiff. f 4 3 

Jiacoletti. f 1 3 

Thomas, f 1 

Engstrom, c 2 

Schwartz, c 3 

Coughlin. g 2 I 

Dunker. g 1 I 2 



11 



10 



10 



THE TIGER 




ypes 



Bookman 

The 

DENTAN 

PRINTING 

COMPANY 

Colorado 
Springs 




Sintons 
for 
Pure Milk 




Official Notices 



Electrical Engineers and Seniors 
majoring in Physics should see Mr. 
Copeland in his office in the Ad- 
ministration Building if they are in- 
terested in securing a very good 
opening with a large Public Utility 
Company. 

This opening involves a two year 
student engineering course with pay 
and holds promise of a splendid 
position in the near future. 



Candidates for the track squad 
should report to Jo Irish immediate- 
ly for practice. Equipment will be 
given out every afternoon from 
3:30 to 5:30 starting today by Bob 
Lackey, equipment manager, in the 
equipment room in Cossitt Hall. 

Track squad candidates are ex- 
pected to work out daily when the 
weather permits on the field or in 
the stadium. 



There will be a spscial assembly 
on Monday, February 10 at 1 1 :30 
A. M. in Perkins Hall at which time 
Bishop P. T. Roe of Alaska will 
speak. 

Classes scheduled for the fourth 
hour on Monday will, therefore, 
be held at the fourth hour on Tues- 
day. February 1 I . 



Owing to the illness of Professor 
B. H. Mautner, Dr. Bradford J. 
Murphy will give a course in So- 
ciology 1, Social Development of 
Personality, during the second se- 
mester. The class will meet at 
10:30 A. M. on Mondays, Tues- 
days and Thursdays. 

Students will be admitted to this 
course without having had the work 
of the first semester. 



Six reels of motion pictures o n 
"Beautiful Germany" will be shown 
at the meeting of the German Club 
on Wednesday, February 12 in the 
Pit of Palmer Hall. The meeting 
will begin at 7:30. 



Students who wish to petition the 
Committee on Individual Courses for 
extra hours, exemption from some 
requirement, or any other matter 
which is not according to rules, 
must see Mrs. Morrow at the Reg- 
istrar's office is the Administration 
Building. 

HULBERT WRITES 



MEMBERS OF FORESTERS 
CLOB CLIMB BALD 

By George Kr.se 
On Thursday morning, Januar 
30th, four members of the Forestei 
Club— namely, Nat Walker, Bo 
Camp, Dick Tubman and G. Kas 
set out to climb Mt. Baldy. Le 
by Walker, who by the way wa 
one of the very few to climb Ml 
Whitney in California last summei 
and who clmbs Pikes Peak whe: 
ever in need of exercise; we se 
out from Stratton Park at 8:3( 
A. M., arriving at Camp Nelsoi 
at 11:30. The trail was in goo( 
shape all the way to Camp Nelson 
After telling Mr. Nelson of our plan 
he told us that he doubted if wi 
would make it, for there had beei 
other parties who tried, but failed 
on account of the deep snow. Afte 
a short rest we started; following 
no particular trail, on the remainint 
two miles in which to climb 3,00( 
feet. Deep snow from 2 to 3 fee 
deep was encountered on the Asper 
flats along the stream. Walker 
breaking trail we arrived at the dam 
at 4:00 P.. M. We arrived at the 
North summit at 4:30 with Walkei 
far in the lead. After entering oui 
names on the register put there by 
the Colorado Mountain Club — on 
which there was only one other 
name which was entered Oct. 26, 
1 929 — we began our descent by the 
way of Crater Canon. After a two 
hour down hill hike we arrived at 
Camp Nelson. According to Mr. 
Nelson, we were the first to climb 
Mt. Baldy this year. We left Camp 
Nelson at 7:15 and arrived at Strat- 
ton Park at 9 P. M., a mighty tired 
bunch, with the exception of Walk- 
er, who surely was named right. 

The next hike by the Foresters 
will be a trip up Pikes Peak. 



A brochure, reprinted from t h e 
Historical Section of "The Fron- 
tier," a magazine of the Northwest, 
published at The State University of 
Montana at Missoula, contains a 
number of letters ?nd historical doc- 
uments edited by Archer Butler Hul- 
bert, Director of the Stewart Com- 
mission on Western Flistory and 
professor of History at Colorado 
College. The letters deal with the 
first days of the First Wagon Train 
on the Road to Oregon. 



At New Mexico University, t h e 
dramatic club is called "The Ko- 
share Mummers." The Lobo in ex- 
plaining the redivation of the term 
states, "The name comes from the 
Indian word for fun-makers, Ko- 
share, and from the Elizabethian 
term for actors. Mummers." 

Colorado Agricultural College is 
going to present as its next play 
Molnar's "Swan." The Colorado 
Springs Little Theater has also 
choses this production to be pre- 
sented in Februrry with Arthur 
Sharp and Mary Strachan of t h e 
college in the major roles. 

In an attempt to remedy and cor- 
rect the system of compulsory Sun- 
day chapel attendance, Princeton 
has substituted a system cf round 
table discussions which rre held on 
Sunday evening. Those who at- 
tend this discussion group need not 
attend church on Sunday. 



THE TIGER 



11 



Badnuze — Now that you're mar- 
led I suppose you're finding out 
/OUT wife's likes and dislikes? 

Benedict — Good night, do you 
uppose she has any Hkes? 



DUTCH 



f (Hammond) for new driver- 
less cars. 

New Fords 7c per mile; 
30c per hour. 

New Cheve Six's 8c per mile; 
35c per hour. 

Office 

ELK HOTEL ! 

Phones M. 346 and 2065 
Free Delivery 



Tonight is j 

College 1 
Night— j 

with Darwin Coit's Orches- • 
tra from 8 to 12 at the ? 

i 

Pikes Peak at Weber | 

Cover Charge j 

^ 50c i 

^ 



£> 



Strachan's 
S^veet 
Shop 

Bijou and Nevada 

Try our Malts and Toasted 

Sandwiches 



C^ 



"Better Equipped Than Ever 
To Handle College Trade." 



CAMPBELL'S 

BARBER SHOP 



East Pikes Peak Avenue 



■ ■ ■♦ 



INTERFRATERNITY HOOP 
SCHEDULE ANNOUNCED 



Feb. 6— Delta Alpha Phi vs. Phi 
Gamma Delta 
Pi Kappa Alpha vs. Independents 
Feb. I 1— Phi Delta Theta vs. Beta 
Theta Pi 
Kappa Sigma vs. Sigma Chi 
Feb. 13— Delta Alpha Phi vs. In- 
dependents 
Phi Delta Theta vs. Sigma Chi 
Feb. 18— Phi Gamma Delta vs. Pi 
Kappa Alpha 
Beta Theta Pi vs. Kappa Sigma 
Feb. 20— Delta Alpha Phi vs. Pi 
Kappa Alpha 
Phi Delta Theta vs. Kappa Sig- 
ma 
Feb. 25 — Phi Gamma Delta vs. In- 
dependents 
Beta Theta Pi vs. Sigma Chi 
Feb. 27— Delta Alpha Phi vs. Phi 
Delta Theta 
Phi Gamma Delta vs. Beta Theta 
Pi 
Mar. 4 — Pi Kappa Alpha vs. Kappa 
Sigma 
Independents vs. Sigma Chi 
Mar. 6— Delta Alpha Phi vs. Sigma 
Chi 
Phi Gamma Delta vs. Kappa Sig- 
ma 
Mar. 1 1— Beta Theta Pi vs. Pi Kap- 
pa Alpha 
Independents vs. Phi Delta Theta 
Mar. 13 — Phi Delta Theta vs. Pi 
Kappa Alpha 
Phi Gamma Delta vs. Sigma Chi 
Mar. 18— Delta Alpha Phi vs. Kap- 
pa Sigma 
Beta Theta Pi vs. Independents 
Mar. 20 — Sigma Chi vs. Pi Kappa 
Alpha 
Independents vs. Kappa Sigma 
Mar. 25— Phi Delta Theta vs. Phi 
Gamma Delta 
Delta Alpha Phi vs. Beta Theta 
Pi 



Rhone Main 1710 

IDEAL 

1 CLEANERS 

5 West Colorado Ave. 



Valetor Pressing Service 



Go To 

Miller Music Co. 

"Where Music Is Sweetest" 
13 North Tejon Street 
for Records and Music 

GEORGE L. MILLER. Prop. 



Hour Glass 



February 3, 1914 

The first dance of the New Year 
was given by the Sigma Chi frater- 
nity at the San Luis school last 
Saturday evening. The hall was 
decorated apropos to Valentine Sea- 
son, hearts of divers sizes being 
used and the chandeliers were dec- 
orated with red and white streame- 
rs. 

February 6, 1914 
The town girls will give a dance 
Friday evening in the McGregor 
gymnasium beginning at 7:30 
o'clock. 

The Colonial Ball, one of t h e 
prettiest affairs in which the wom- 
en of the college take part each 
year, will occur on the 20th. The 
chairman of the decoration com- 
mittee has planned an effective set- 
ting for the quaint and beautiful 
costumes which are one of the at- 
tractive features of the ball. 
February 10, 1914 
In spite of the cold wind more 
than twenty candidates for the 
track team reported at the Hager- 
man Hall gymnasium Saturday 
morning for the first regular prac- 
tice in preparation for the State in- 
door meet to be held in Denver on 
the last day of the month. 

The Bemis freshmen gave a 
spread Monday night. 

February 13, 1914 
At a meeting of the faculty mem- 
bers of the Phi Beta Kappa society, 
Tuesday afternoon, February 10, 
eight Seniors and two Juniors were 
elected to membership. 

February 13, 1914 
Helen Keller, who is making her 
first lecture tour, will speak at the 
Burns Theatre, Friday evening, 
Feb. 27. Miss Keller will be ac- 
companied by her teacher, Mrs. 
Macy, in whose care she has been 
since she was six years old. 
February 13, 1914 
A committee was chosen from the 
Student Commission Thursday af- 
ternoon to make arrangements for 
the annual "All College Picnic," 
which is scheduled for Washing- 
ton's Birthday. The affair which is 
held in the Garden of the Gods, is 
one of the few opportunities for 
every man and woman on the cam- 
pus to unite in a general good 
time. 

Covers will be laid at the Acacia 
Hotel tonight, when the women of 
Hypalia will be hostesses at an 
elaborate dinner. At a box party at 
the Burns, which will follow, the 
guests will have the pleasure of lis- 
tening to Kreisler. 

Kappa Sigma will initiate eight 
pledges Saturday. 

The Dais entertained the fresh- 



men of Bemis Thursday afternoon 
in the Commons Room with an in- 
formal tea. 

A party of college students 
tramped to Red Rock Canon Wed- 
nesday for dinner. 

A numbtr of Kappa Sigs and 
their lady friends took dinner at 
Bruin Inn Wednesday night. 

With the approach of spring the 
baseball fever has once more re- 
turned to the blood and prepara- 
tioss are being made to make t h e 
season of intercollegiate baseball a 
success. 

The Sigma Chi fraternity with 
their lady friends tramped to Bruin 
Inn Thursday night. 



"We should never, never count 
our birthdays. — Mary Pickford. 



ISAAC BROTHERS 

WATCHMAKERS and JEWELERS 

32 East Bijou Street 



Special for 
Saturday 

ASSORTED CREAM 

CARAMELS 

49c lb. 

HUGHES 
CHOCOLATES 



Under New Management 

The College 
Barber Shop 

Ralph Schildknecht, Proprietor 

103 E. Cache la Poudre 
Colorado Springs 



We Make a Specialty of 

CLEANING AND DYEING MEN'S 

AND WOMEN'S SHOES 

GOLDEN CYCLE SHINE PARLOR 

Todd Colbert 

Lobby Golden Cycle BIdg. 
Tejon and Pikes Peak 



♦— 



THE 



Crissey & Fowler 

LUMBER CO. 

MILL WORK 
BUILDERS' SUPPLIES 



Main 101 
117-127 W.Vermijo 



12 



THE TIGER 



COSSITT 
DINING HALL 



Back your College 

in every good thing 

— even in eating 




THE COST IS MODERATE 
FOR THE BEST OF MEALS 



WEEKLY RATE $7.25 
Credit for Single Meals 



THE TIGER 



13 



T. J. Collier T. M. Collier 

V. L. Collier 

TheCOLUER 

LUMBER CO. 

Phone Main 386 
543 W. Colorado Ave. 




S ervices f o r your 
car that includes 

Proper Lubrication 

100% Alemite 

LEADING MOTOR OILS 

Weaverized Washing 

Tire Repairing Road Service 

Drive in Today 






FIRESTONE TIRES 
117 N. Nevada Phone M. 202 



Q. 



[uality 

Cleaners and Dyers 

SUITS. O'COATS 

HATS $1.25 

U-Fone 1-8-1-1 We'll CaU 

H. A. Thompson 
10 E. Kiowa 



WHY NOT 

Learn Typewriting 
while attending Col- 
lege? Your teachers 
will appreciate type- 
written work to be 
checked. We can ar- 
range hours to suit 
your convenience. 









Bramhall And Pupils 
Go To Boulder To Study 



A group of students of Colorado 
College went to Boulder on Wed- 
nesday, January 29, as guests of the 
History Club of the University o f 
Colorado, to discuss with it and 
with a group of students from Den- 
ver University plans for a model 
assembly of the League of Nations. 
Colleges and universities af the 
state are to give this on March 1, 
at the State Capitol in Denver. 

Dr. Edith C. Bramhall, Professor 
of Political Science at Colorado 
College, accompanied the students. 
The group included Grace Perkins, 
Alice Gillett, Josephyne Hildrich, 
Letitia Finn, Stewart Wilson, Hart- 
ley Murray, Burton Paddock, Rob- 
ert Caldwell, Frank Seeley, and 
Humphrey Saunders. 

During their stay, they were en- 
tertained at fraternity and sorority 
houses. Thursday morning. Dr. 
Wang, formerly president of t h e 
Chinese Eastern Railroad, gave a 
talk on the Foreign Relations of 
China. The group returned Thurs- 
day afternoon. 

After the Model Assembly on 
March 1, there will be a banquet, 
at which Dr. Alfred Zimmern, head 
of the School of International Rela- 
tions in Geneva, Dr. Wolf Von De- 
wall, president of the German Lea- 
gue of Nations Association, and 
Mr. Norman Thomas of New York, 
will speak. 



Copeland Enthusiastic 
Over Debate Prospects 



With the arrival of another de- 
bate season, the Tiger orators a r e 
confronted with the heaviest sched- 
ule in many years. Intensive work 
is being done on the disarmament 
question by a large squad. 

The Colorado Debate Confer- 
ence, to be held here February 23, 
24,- and 25, will see seven schools 
gathered to match arguments on 
this subject. Besides acting as 
hosts to the other schools, Colorado 
College will be represented in three 
men's debates and two women's de- 
bates at this meeting. All the meet- 
ings will be held in Colorado 
Springs before various school and 
organization audiences. 

The home schedule will be com- 
pleted with a debate with the Uni- 
versity of South Dakota on March 
13. Following this, the men's team 
will leave for an extended tour of 
the East, where a very complete 
schedule has been arranged. 

Coach Copeland is very enthus- 
iastic over the prospects for this 
year's team. Definite places are to 
be announced in the near future. 
Miss Amanda M. Ellis is in charge 
of the girl's squad. 



MIEROW BACK TO CAMPUS 
FROM EASTERN JOURNEY 

(Continued from page 3) 
Before returning to Colorado 
College, President Mierow visited 
Brown University and the Univer- 
sity of Chicago, and the officials of 
various educational foundations. 
President Mierow expects to leave 
soon for California to visit alumni 
meetings on the west coast, 
favor of pushing the endowment 
campaign in the East. 



The charter of the Western Re- 
serve chapter of Alpha Tau Omega 
has been withdrawn, according to 
the "Purple, Green and Gold" of 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 

Hopefully, the "Rattle" of Theta 
Chi reports that "no reform move- 
ment in the Greek-letter worl